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I’d thought this tanker was part of the Eagle fleet . . . although occasionally I’d wondered if there might be this laker connection, too.   Maybe if I’d been more familiar with a certain border region in the US quite far away from the sixth boro, I would have grasped the name immediately . . .   Answer follows, if you don’t know.  Also, how many McAllister boats can you spot here?

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Did you get this one?  Can you identify it now that you’ve seen the first two photos?

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This one is Robert E., leaving the other as quite likely Ellen.

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And another question–this one from long-time reader WS–what connection has Eagle Ford with El Faro?

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That’s the Seabulk logo.

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EagleFord and El Farro were both built at Sun Shipbuilding, as hull #668 and 670, respectively.   Thanks to WS for pointing this out.

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And Eagle Ford . . . it’s a town in Texas that’s associated with oil shale.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Icy roads are here again.  Well, even if they’re not–not yet– in the downstate area, New Yorkers place a value on being prepared.  You might call that a NY value, but I’m not going any further there.  And more accurately, preparing for the future is a universal value.

And in this season, bulkers arrive with beautiful names like Lake Dahlia and with holds filled with dozens of thousands of tons of “de-icer,” this load being off a desert in Chile.  A previous ship had come from this part of Mexico.

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In less than a handful of hours after “all fast,” clamshells start discharging at the rate of 30 tons per scoop.

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Two operations happen simultaneously . . . cranes empty the holds and

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loaders fill the trucks.

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When that ice starts coating the roadways,

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you and all the others thousands of drivers have a lot

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better chance of staying on track to

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your intended destination.  The photo below suggests it’s coming time for another truckster post.

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

Many thanks to Brian DeForest of Atlantic Salt.

 

 

There are new vessels and then there are less new ones.  Guess what year Allegro came off the ways?  Answer follows.   Note all the bridges in the northern end of Newark Bay, and a train is crossing one of them.

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Which McAllister YTB is that?

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You can read it now.  Robert E. is one of over a dozen rebuilt YTBs in the McAllister fleet.

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As high out of the water as Allegro seems, there’s still over 20′ draft.

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And the age question, Allegro dates from 2012, a Croatian built tanker.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Since it’s THE maiden voyage arrival, let’s follow her all the way to “all fast.”  Here were parts 1 and 2, which followed her from several miles out in the Ambrose Channel to the Narrows and then from there to mid-KVK.

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Eric works the starboard and Ellen, the port.

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The turn at Bergen Point is way more than 90 degrees . . . more like 135, and

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takes well-timed thrusting at bow and stern.  Notice Atlantic Concert just above Eric‘s stern?

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Atlantic Concert is completing its clockwise spin here to line up its stern ramp, a maneuver

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that Atlantic Star will replicate.

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Here Eric McAllister is beginning the push on the stern to assist with that clockwise spin;  Ellen and Atlantic Star‘s own three thrusters are also likely engaged.

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Spin complete, Eric moves over to the port side to nudge Atlantic Star gently against the dock.  I wrote about the reverse maneuver here some years ago.

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Getting a profile of these two CONROs lined up . . . is not easy, since they represent nearly a half mile of ship.

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Foreshortening helps a little.

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I’ll be watching for the remainder of the G4 vessels–Atlantic Sail, Atlantic Sea, Atlantic Sky, and Atlantic Sun.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, with thanks  to NY Media Boat.

Also many thanks to JS, a retired harbor worker who made this connection for me between Atlantic Container Line, their generation 2 vessels, and John A. Noble.  The image below comes from pages 210 –11 of Erin Urban’s Hulls and Hulks in the Tide of Time, a must-read for all students of the sixth boro work boats.   Noble called the 1977 print “The Cinderella Passes the Occidental,” and then writes his sense of this new container ship passing the hulk of 1874 full-rigged ship called the Occidental.  He also alludes to having drawn the Atlantic Cinderella when she was brand new, but I have yet to locate copies of those drawings.  Oh well.  Many thanks to JS, whose previous contribution you might have seen here.

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John A. Noble’s “The Cinderella Passes the Occidental”

Let’s pick up from yesterday and follow Atlantic Star from the Narrows to the part of the KVK called the “salt pile.”  To the right off the stern of Atlantic Star, that’s lower Manhattan.

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Ellen McAllister swoops in to deliver the docking pilot.  The signature “G” on the stack points to Grimaldi Group, of which ACL is an associate. Grimali’s West Africa service is a regular in the sixth boro with such vessels as Grande Morocco.

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Seen from head-on, the bow is knife edged, but in profile it’s plumb. Yes, that’s the Statue of Liberty in the distance.

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That’s Robbin Reef Light and WTC1 just off its right.  Atlantic Star and the other G4 vessels are operated by a crew of 16, compared with 21 for the G3 vessels like Atlantic Concert.

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The cranes in the distance are at the MOTBY terminal.

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We’re now in the KVK with the salt pile to port and

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the Bayonne Bridge ahead, and Atlantic Concert being assisted beneath.

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Eric McAllister joins, and we’ll pick it up there tomorrow.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to the NY Media Boat for conveyance.

Here was Atlantic Star approaching the Narrows on Saturday, still a half hour outside the Narrows.  She was launched at the Hudong-Zhonghua Shipyard almost a year ago, and this maiden cargo voyage began in Hamburg on December 9, 2015.    Note the FDNY escort boat just forward of her bow.

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That’s the Verrazano Narrows Bridge off her bow and a fog-beshrouded WTC off her stern.

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The generation 4 (G4)  Atlantic Star followed a G3 Atlantic Concert into port.   Here and here are views from different perspectives of other G3 ACL vessels, all dating from the mid-1980s.

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More photos of the arrival tomorrow.

For a comparison of the G3 and G4 vessels by the numbers, click here and here.  For more detail on the vessel, click here.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, protected under creative commons license.  Also, conveyance would not have been possible without the NY Media Boat;  thanks Bjoern.

 

No, I haven’t left the sixth boro.  Just yesterday I crossed paths with Allie B here at Atlantic Salt, purveyor of a safety product and patron of the arts.

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It took a gray day for me to notice that the house colors along the KVK are reminiscent of those in coastal Canadian maritimes towns.  Allie B has been one of my favorite tugboats since I saw her depart on her epic tow here and here back in 2009.

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Then I passed Evelyn Cutler, here with Noelle Cutler at Caddell Drydock.  Those are basic Wavertree masts in the background.  I first saw Evelyn

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in red.

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Here’s a first good photo of Dylan Cooper, the Reinauer tug that arrived in the sixth boro later last year.

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I hope to get another of her here in a few years when that bridge is completed.

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I believe Eric is the newest of McAllister tugs in the sixth boro.  And yes, here Eric is using her 5000+ hp to assist Atlantic Star, ACL‘s brand spanking new CONRO vessel into port yesterday on her maiden voyage.  I hope to have a post dedicated to Atlantic Star completed for tomorrow.

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Eric is a product of the same Rhode Island shipyard that produced Dylan Cooper.  In the distance that’s one of ACL’s previous generation of CONRO vessels, Atlantic Concert.  Here’s an entire post dedicated to Atlantic Concert from 2009.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, with thanks to NY Media boat. 

And yes, I still have more of Barrel’s vintage USACE photos to share.

 

Know this water, more of a waterway than a harbor?  The distant buildings are a clue.  See the one just left of the center of bridge center, needle thin?

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Here’s another clue . . . the structure near the right side of the photo, like an old time gas station pump?

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Or this one left of the crane, looking like the business end of a blue crab whose pincers are down?

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Or this wreck?  What WAS this boat?  I’ve asked a million people who all say they also asked a million people.  Anyone know?

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And seriously, the first photo showed the Throgs Neck Bridge, the second the LaGuardia airport traffic tower, and the third . . . Arthur Ashe stadium.  The photo above with the mystery wreck in the Whitestone Bridge .  .. the second one in when you travel from Long Island Sound into . . . the East River

And that needle thin tower in 432 Park, said to be the tallest residential building in the hemisphere.  Click here for views from the tallest bathtub in that building.  And in the foreground of the photo below, truly a place of superlatives . . . . Rikers Island, i.e., one of the largest incarceration places in the world.  No gunk holing is tolerated anywhere near this place.

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Rikers has literally overflowed its banks.  This is the off-Rikers portion of NYC Corrections, the Vernon C. Bain Center.   

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Click here for a tugster photo of part of the Rikers fleet.  And here for Bain’s NYC floating prison predecessor.

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By now, most of you know this is the East River and we’re traveling west.  Here the DEP sludge tanker Red Hook prepares to depart the Hunt’s Point wastewater treatment plant.   Click here for some tugster posts on treating waste and keeping sixth boro waters as clean as possible despite the teeming millions that live along the banks of these waters.   And if you’ve never read my Professional Mariner story on the latest generation of these tankers, you can do so here.

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Between Rikers and Hunts Point, there are the North and South Brother Islands;  see my post from South Brother here from a long time ago.  The safer channel goes around the north of North Brother, but in daylight, most vessels can shoot between the two.

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I’ve never set foot on North Brother, but I imagine it a terrestrial version of the “graveyard” on the Arthur Kill. 

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A “night wharf” on Wards Island for the sludge tankers lies here just east of the Hell Gate and RFK bridges there.

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This strait–between Roosevelt Island and the upper east side of Manhattan–in the tidal strait that’s known as the East River can see some fast currents. Somewhere off to the right is the vantage point Jonathan Steinman takes his East river pics from.

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This is not a cargo pier.  These vessels are repairing the bulk heading.

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Anyone know the identity of these two “houses” nestled up there in the eastisde of Manhattan cliffs?

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These barges called the Water Club  . . . I’ve never been there.  Any personal reviews?

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Newtown Creek awaits its fate here at a dock in Wallabout Bay right across

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from the rock wharf where Alice Oldendorff has discharged millions of tons of crushed rock over the years.

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After we duck under the Brooklyn Bridge, we near the end of the East River,

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where South Street Seaport Museum has been fighting the noble fight to

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preserve ships and the upland including the wharves.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s the index of previous “names.”

I love surprises, but some pass almost unnoticed to most.  For example, did you know Ernest Hemingway visited the sixth boro a few weeks ago?  The Hemingway IMO 9295177.  Ditto Charles Dickens, earlier this spring.  Now I wish Thomas Pynchon would visit, given that he wrote about it . . . and tell me about it in advance.  Orange Ocean is in town, but please, no more orange rivers.  Alpine Mary is here now, but please no typhoid Mary.  YM Unicorn, yes . . . they exist.  And a really crazy one, a tug on Lake Ontario yesterday, Radium Yellowknife!  Wow!

When I saw on AIS that Buffalo Hunter was bound for sea, my tired brain thought Bob Marley and wondered which of his songs would be emblazoned on a bow and stern soon . . . Stir It Up, maybe?

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Then I realized the second word was “hunter” and not “soldier,” and the paint job looked neo-dazzle.

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Strange . . .

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So let’s get out front and look the vessel over again.  Unusual paint-on figurehead.

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What’s that around the upper railings of the house?

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Barbed wire!  Coils and coils of it.  Has the sixth boro gotten a nasty reputation?

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Seriously, I’m guessing it’s for some pirate-infected waterways elsewhere.  Anyone care to share more about the story?

Here was barbed wire mustache on a vessel in Cape Town a few years back.  Maybe this is a cheap-fix for better internet?

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Wow!  When I typed “wall” into the search window, I came up with this somewhat silly post from 2007!  But one of the photos shows Barents Sea when I first saw her in the sixth boro.

What I was thinking with the word “wall” today is that the hull of a vessel walls out any info about the crew, the cargo, the human climate on board!  By looking at  this image of a section of the hull, you can tell what it carries, where it came from, its age .  .  I could go on.  Actually, all those patches notwithstanding, the vessel is four years old.  Anyhow, my point is

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two thirds of the planet is inhabited by “worlds” walled off like this and more often moving throughout the latitudes and longitudes and climate zones and political regions and hot spots . . . .

and if you missed Ian Urbina’s articles recently in the NYTimes called “The Outlaw Ocean,”  check them out and the comments here.   I’m still stuffed with the food for thought presented there.

Photo by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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