Answer can be found at the end of this post.  I was thrilled to find this sixth boro foto today.  Shot appears to be towards the northwest, but I’m not certain yet.  It appears to be a merge of two fotos.  On lower left side of my original foto the handwritten number “1906″ is visible.  A date?  Maybe not.  Doubleclick enlarges.

Now we sweep from right to left.  I see at least a “stick deck barge” and an Erie covered barge on this side of the pier, which has a crane on it.  Then a ?? 200′ unfinished steel vessel, something beyond that, and a four-masted schooner farther still at a dock.

Middle sections shows steamer Ursula and an unidentified (by me) vessel “south” of the cove off its stern.  I can’t quite make out details in the cove.  There was an Ursula that operated at one point between the Battery and Glen Island (near New Rochelle.)  Another  shot of Ursula appears in this 1919 foto. Beyond the many buildings on this part of the island . . . at least two hulls surrounded by scaffolding?

More manufacturing buildings and a larger “wooden stick barge.”  Lettering on the white building says “Standard Shipbuilding Corp.”    That should be the clue that identifies this place.  But did they operate here only between 1917 and 1921?  Could 10,000 workers have operated here daily?

It’s Shooter’s Island as I could never have imagined it!!  Click here for some Standard/Shooters built vessels.  One of these Standard/Shooters vessel–SS San Tiburcio–was mined and sunk in 1940 and now attracts divers, as here.  Of course, the most famous Shooter’s product must be Meteor III, launched Feb 25, 1902 (click here for a very detailed NYTimes account of the event) which eventually was broken up at a site not far from Shooters.   More on that later, I hope.  An interesting note on the christening of Meteor III . . . the act was done by Alice Roosevelt, who later . . . 1959, also christened the USS Theodore Roosevelt SSBN-600.  Can anyone point me to fotos of Meteor III aka Aldebaran when she came back to the sixth boro for scrapping?

Foto thanks to Ed Fanuzzi, whose father worked on ships on Shooters.    I’ll never be able to look at Shooters the same again.

Has anyone published a Shooters Island shipbuilding book?

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