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May 15, 2018 was the 100th anniversary of the opening of the Barge Canal.  That fact was mentioned at the ceremonies opening the Canal to recreational traffic yesterday, and quite a diverse and international flotilla of recreational boats waited, like racers on the starter’s blocks.

But first, do you recognize this captain?

Well, he waved at all these school kids who serenaded him and all the other boats, first of the season, leaving lock E2.  For prices on similar Hinckley 36 picnic boats, click here.

Sonically greeting them also were two Canal vessels:  Governor Cleveland and Grand Erie.

But let’s step back about 15 minutes.  The lower gates of E2 open to reveal the queue.

The nearest boat to the left was driven by the gentleman I asked whether you could identify.  The large vessel to the right — a 78′ Azimut Benetti Spa registered in Grand Rapids MI–was rumored to belong to a well-known professional basketball player.

 

It was the second batch locking through that brought the more unique westbound boats.

The green vessel —Oliver Plunkett-– Canadian registry, was returning from a stint in the Bahamas.  Her PEI fishing pedigree is quite noticeable.

Troll–hailing from Elburg NL– intrigues me, but I can’t point out anything besides an unusual name and bright hull color, both of which you’ve already noticed.

Broadsword, German registry, is a 58′ New Zealand-built Artnautica LRC 58 motoring around the world to the east, although here headed west.

Each of these boats has a story, many stories, I’ll never know.

 

And finally, this Florida-registered Axopar caught my attention too late and too far from the camera.  But, check out these Finnish boat designs.

To see some unusual recreational boat designs, lock E2 is the place to be on opening day.  I would be remiss, however, to leave out reference to commercial vessels . . . several of whom have already locked through, and that may be a story I pick back up in a few days.

The first boat here–a Nordhavn 62– was an unusual vessel to see up in Waterford.

And the person at the helm of the Hinckley, it was Geraldo Rivera, whom you’ve likely heard of.  But, check out his info on this wiki page for lots of tidbits you probably don’t know, eg, he attended SUNY Maritime, he’s a lawyer, he went to West Babylon High School, and some scandals . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d love to hear more about any of these boats at points farther west . . .

 

 

Name this vessel?  Right there is the name.  Answer at end of the post.

I’d love to see the interior, as it might be as stark as the lines.

This is severe, almost military, but I like it.

This to is excess with an excessive name . . . Vibrant Curiosity, which

happens to be the slogan of the owner’s company.  Here are the particulars of the vessel built in Alblasserdam as was this vessel seen in this blog before completion.

All these photos I took on Sunday a high summer day for large yachts.  What might you call this one?

Podium.  What?  Yup that’s the name.  In spite of the too-analytical name, the manufacturer–Lürssen–has a long and interesting history.    And if I had the means and the need for a Lurssen I’d go for the spaceman’s boat here.

Over in the Hudson, I spotted this yacht with the “name” on the bow as an abbreviation for

Cantina,  built in Brazil.

And the name of the top boat here is “water,”  a quite good name for anything that floats.  Check out the kanji here.  Japanese is pronounced as “mizu,” and I’m not sure how Mandarin would be pronounced. Here’s an article with info on a feature I missed . . . a feature I’ve seen on ships in the harbor, since crews of no matter what vessel need exercise on the water.

All photos and sentiments by Will Van Dorp, who’s posted on similar yachts here and (more modestly) here.

OK, one more, a photo I took in October 2008, an expedition trawler over in Long Island City and said to have belonged to Björk Guðmundsdóttir.  I wonder if she still owns it.

 

 

 

I shouldn’t be surprised to find pricey boats in a city like NYC, but I still am.  I took the first two photos here in Chelsea Piers, and I imagined their understated elegant lines meant they were affordable.  Well, maybe they are easily affordable by the incoming executive branch standards, but for most folks, not so much.  Look them up . . . Van Dutch boats.

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I also shouldn’t be surprised how fast some boats travel on the Hudson, but this one flew past at

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least 35 knots, and it wasn’t small.  I’ve no idea who the manufacturer is.

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Traveling in the canal makes for a slower pace, with people going for the distance, like

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Pioche.  They must know about some new navigation canal infrastructure plans I’m not privy to.  And I wonder who they hope to meet in Pioche.

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If I bought another cruising boat, I’d want something like this . . .

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here upbound the St Lawrence.  I’m not positive it’s a pleasure boat, but PCF does not mean patrol craft, fast.  It could be Provincial C___  for Fisheries?

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I’m not sure what this is, besides a boat.  Anyone know the story?  She was up north of the Scarano barns in Albany.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was 1 and another I could have called “summer yachts” as well.  And then there are this one and another . . .  again . . .

Pilar is a stunner in so many ways . . .  registered in Key West and originally Elhanor, I believe it was built in Brooklyn one hull BEFORE Hemingway’s Pilar.

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I caught it in Narragansett Bay . . . .

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Off the Bronx, this unnamed unidentified vessel, likely NOT built in the Bronx,  roared past.

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Some interesting boats on the wall at Waterford here include Solar Sal, Manatee, and Little Manatee.

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Manatee is a Kadey Krogen with an unusual paint scheme.

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I took this photo of Solar Sal last September and had intended to get back to it.  Later last fall it distinguished itself by hauling cargo.

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Tjaldur is an unusual

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double-ender.

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Old Glory is an Owens . . . seen in Buffalo on the 4th of July.

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In Mackinac, I saw this 1953 Chris Craft named

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Marion Leigh.

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Here’s another shot of the rare Whiticar Boat Works yacht Elegante pushing back water.

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And sometimes it takes going a long distance to find a Bronx-built yacht like this 1937 Consolidated named

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Sea Spray.  I’d love to see her under way.  For more Bronx built boats, click here.

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Ditto . . . in the same Chicago marina . . . this Chris Craft.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

. . .  if that were the case, I’d go shopping for a yacht.  I’d look at Emerald .  . nah!

Let me see . . . this one?

Sea Knight?  Nah!

Aquarius?

Virginia?  Nah and nah!  But hark over there . . .

by the Statue . . .  not the one that’s jacked up on three legs . . . the other one . . .

It’s okay . . . no need to turn back, I mean no harm, I’m just an over-enthusiastic fan . . .

as Fred calls it, the  previously “rollover lifeboat,” originally a 1929 government boat.  I like it, even if it was a very bad year.  I’d love to see the interior space.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.   And those trawlers, I don’t know the manufacturers’ names.

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