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Photos will be forthcoming in this post;  I’m just using unusual formatting deliberately.

Ponder this:  what association do you have with the phrase “new yorker”, not “new york or ny”?

person?

personality?

quality or lack thereof?

place?

thing?

publication?

There are no right or wrong answers here.

time period?

business maybe?

I repeat . . .. just what association comes first to mind when you hear or read the phrase “new yorker”?

Well . . .

. . .

I’ll bet you did not expect this.

Many thanks to Xtian Herrou, frequent contributor on this blog . . . he sent these photos along yesterday, taken in Brest, in NE France.

Technically, the name is Newyorker, and she’s currently approaching LeHavre from Brest.

 

I’ biased of course, but  it warms my heart to see this, although I must admit that my association involves a magazine famous for its nonfiction and cartoons. In fact, an image from that magazine has appeared on this blog here (scroll)  and here. By the way, in that second link, tugster himself is holding the tooth–not of a mammoth but–of a suction dredge cutterhead, and if anyone wants to claim that 35-pound tooth, I’d be happy to pass it on.

Many thanks to Xtian for these photos.

 

What is the possible identity of the Moran tug below?  We really don’t know.

The source is Xtian Herrou, a regular tugster reader and commenter.  He writes:  “Seen yesterday during a local model expo at Crozon  in Brittany, France.  The tug is very small (scale 1/400) and there is not really a name, just white tag.  For details about the SS Brasil (1957),  you can read the panel on picture 6326

Personally, I’m thrilled that a model maker in France does a Moran tug.

And a question from a reader, Mike Hatami, who did not take the photo.  Mike provided follow-up on the repurposing of NYC DEP vessel Newtown Creek two years ago here.

What is this vessel?  Is it a USN vessel?

 

A possible answer is found  here.   “We use these specifically in San Diego. I don’t know where this picture was taken, but we have a least a couple of these things tied to the pier right across from all the submarines. This exact type of tug. I don’t know how you guys do it in Norfolk, and hopefully I’ll never find out.”  And

“It’s a security tug. Those protective barriers surrounding the water portion of the navy base don’t move themselves. It’s the equivalent of opening the gate for cattle to go in and out. Unlock it, unlatch it, swing it open, and close it when the ship has passed.    Source: Submariner.”

Is this true?  Is this really a USN commissioned vessel?

Thanks for reading and contributing, Xtian and Mike.

 

 

So here was 1 and in it I said I would answer a question in a few days and now a few weeks have passed.  The question pertained to the device mounted on the stern of vessel

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Husky.  Congrats to Seth Tane, who guessed correctly.  Here’s what Xtian writes:  “It’s a plough.  In French we talk about “nivelage” [leveling], which means after dredging the bottom of the sea is like a field that has just passed a plow.  This tool cuts the bump to fill the gap.  It’s also used in the rivers where the “alluvium” or the mud stays in always same places because of the current and built like “bottom hill” there.  And it happens also in some harbour (like ferries’ harbour) as because the ferries always doing the same maneuver and raise the mud that still lay at the same place.

With the plough used at the right time, ebb tide for example, the mud is raised and leaves the harbour with tidal current.  In some places the plough is used to feed the hopper dredger –  when the dredger is too large, the plough is used to remove a “bottom hill” when they are close to the bank to give the mud at the place where the hopper dredge is working.   The plough is not only used with mud but also with sand or pebble.  Google with words : Dredge – Plough.

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About Husky, the day I took this picture she was working closely with the dredge Rijndelta at the entrance of Maasvlakte harbor.   I add a picture of her below.”
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More of Xtian’s photos follow, like this closeup of the captain of Smit Cheetah,

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Fairplay 24 and 21,

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Union 11 passing the Mammoet headquarters,

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Smit Schelde,

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SD Rebel,

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Multratug 31, 

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Osprey Fearless, 

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Pieter (?) towing Matador 2,

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and finally the recently completed Noordstroom.

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Many thanks to Xtian for these photos of another watershed.

Xtian has been sharing photos here for some time.  Now it turns out he and I were in the tiny dorp of Maassluis within days of each other earlier this month, as evidenced by his photo of Furie, which was in the same spot the day I visited here (and scroll).

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I would never have guessed RPA 14 is 31 years old!  Xtian certainly caught the light right here.

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Smit Ebro has been on this blog before, as in this post.

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Equipment on Husky?Make your guesses and on Monday or so, I’ll explain.

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Smit Cheetah and SD Seal . . . doing fire equipment training?

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FairPlay 21 … in between Smit Panther 

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and FairPlay 24 with still more Smit tugs in the foreground.

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Here’s part of the Kotug fleet.  From left, it’s unidentified, RT Evolution, SD Rebel, and RT Adiaan.  Click on each of the three links previous to see how different those three tugs are.

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Smit Hudson has been around since 2008.

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Click here for the entire FairPlay list.

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Many thanks to Xtian for these photos.

Today’s photos come from Xtian Herrou.  See the tug over there, the one the sailor in red must be looking at?  By the way, I’ve posted Xtian’s photos here and here before.  The rigging that dominates the photo below propels a vessel that will be making a stop in the sixth boro this coming summer.  Any guesses?  Her name–or rather the translation thereof–is a matter of some difference of opinion.

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There’s the tug, Abeille Bourbon.

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The sailing vessel is L’Hermione.  Here’s the name matter as described by Xtian:  “There is a fault in her name because of the English speakers who removed L’ as it means the but with the French navy for some ships the Le– La or L’ is really part of the name.  The apostrophe does not really exist in English, and on AIS her name is Lhermione to be correctly alphabetically placed at L.  Furthermore, the Association name is wrong as Hermione, and the mistake was discovered too late *:"> Piquage de fard.  A similar difference exists between the  French La Fayette and the English Lafayette, which, given my last name (Van Dorp or Vandorp or van Dorp), I understand clearly . . .

Rick “old salt” did a post here about this some months back.  I especially enjoyed the discussion in “comments” section.

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