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1997.  Taken from QE2 as it overtakes a Moran tug  . . .

 

 

taken some days later as the QE2 returns, passing the Towers at dawn…

while possibly the same Moran tug meets it again.

May 1998.  Bounty arrives.

May 2000.  Morgan Reinauer passes lower Manhattan in the fog.

January 11, 2001.  Peggy Sheridan, now Apex’s  Brooklyn, passes on a cold winter day.

Places, as with people, you never know when you’ll see them the last time.  Steve wrote me once that he passed the Towers on September 2, 2001 on the way to the tugboat race starting line.  He looked at the Towers, but didn’t take out his camera …   because he’d taken so many photos of the Towers before.  I fully understand.  

I can’t say I remember my breakfast that morning or getting onto my LIRR at 05:17 that morning in Seaford, as I always did, with folks I always saw then  . . .

but I’d never see them again, because they worked in that building.

I know it’s the same for folks who’d come on watch a few hours earlier that morning with one set of orders, and then before 0900 were faced with this.

Hat tip to Joel Milton for this account of his day just about 20 years ago.  Workboat has republished in November 2001 account.   From ProfessionalMariner, here are some links.

RIP.

All photos supplied by Steve Munoz.

 

August 2021.  Samatha Miller follows the channel just north of the Staten Island Yankees stadium.  Note today’s skyline.

1970.  The rest of these photos I share thanks to Steve Munoz. Note the early night skyline here shows the Towers under construction.

1970 Dalzelleagle in the Buttermilk Channel passing USCG cutters tied up alongside Governors Island.  Dalzelleagle, a 1958 Jakobson product, later became McAllister Bros, which was scrapped earlier this year.   In a comment in an earlier post, Tony A identifies one of the cutters as the storied USCG Dallas (WHEC-716), now BRP Ramon Alcaraz (PS-16),  pride of the Philippines Navy.

1971.  McAllister Bros southbound in the Upper Bay.

1971.  The aircraft looks to be amphibious.  Anyone help?  I’d say that’s a Kennedy-class ferry,  And at the foot of the Tower, note the fireboats tied up at Pier A, occupied by FDNY from 1960 until 1992.

1973.  SS Olympia headed for sea.  Her career spanned 1953 until 2009, when she was beached in Alang.

1973.  McAllister Bros. northbound off Hoboken.

1973.  Dalzellera.  That makes her 58 years old at this point.

1973. Concordia Gulf bound for sea. 

1985.  Statue scaffolded for repairs.

1992.  As seen from a ship on Newark Bay at dawn.

1992.  Kerry Moran seven years before her wheelhouse and propulsion were reconfigured.

Many thanks to Steve for sharing these photos, pre-dating my time here.  I moved to the area and started working in Brooklyn in 2000.

It should go without saying what the focus here is.  More to come. Here‘s what I posted exactly 10 years ago, when it seems to me, we were still a united people sharing common losses and goals.

Here is just one of the many posts I’ve done on Janice Ann Reinauer, now working in Nigeria under new ownership.  Here’s a post I did featuring her and siblings about to leave almost exactly two years ago, high and dry on Blue Marlin.   Of course, the skyline in the background shows that here–about 30 years ago–she was getting some attention at the drydock over in Jersey City just north of the Morris Canal.

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Here’s a closer-up of the yard tug on the shoreside of the drydock.  Can anyone fill in more info on this fairweather vessel?

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Here are two shots looking at what is now a very different Jersey City bank.

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Only the lettering Bert Reinauer II offers clues here.  Anyone know the vessel to the left?  Bill Lynch speculates it’s pilot  boat New York (1972), and I’m inclined to think he’s right.

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And finally, a repeat foto from yesterday . . . in addition to the identification sent through comments by tugboathunter and jeff s, here’s what Harold’s eureka moment came up with . . . revealing a bit of his process: ” I finally cracked the case on that green unidentifiable tug.  I looked at that photo, got away from it several times after tearing my hair out, and finally went back.  Saying to myself,  ‘That boat looks familiar.  I’ve seen it in the last few years painted a different color.  The Tug Races, that’s it, the Tug Races.’ ”   Interjection:  here’s a post I did in 2007 showing what Harold remembers.

Harold continues: “She was built in 1959 in Norfolk, Va. (yard unknown) as SHRIKE.  She was later renamed SALLY, and then BILL MATHER (that’s where the MATHER comes in from my observation).  I couldn’t make out the name BILL.  She was MONAHAN before becoming LONG SPLICE.  Her owner in 1993, as MONAHAN according to Carl’s records was Monahan Towing Co.  I looked in a 1978 MERCHANT VESSELS OF THE UNITED STATES, under BILL MATHER, and found her owners as Tug Leasing Corp., Delaware.  A final look in a MERCHANT VESSELS OF THE UNITED STATES 1965 under SHRIKE shows her owners as Southern Tug Corp.”

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Again, all these vintage fotos, which allow this time travel, come compliments of Seth Tane.  Click here for his current endeavors.

Here and here are two posts I’ve done on Harold.

Finally, I’ve written to folks in Nigeria to attempt to get fotos of boats there formerly here . . . still to no effect.  Anyone help?

in other words, the newest, pumpingest FDNY boat, which–if it serves as many years as Firefighter has–will be in service beyond 2080.  343 is the vessel facing in the lower left, the one not spraying yet.  The year 2080, now that’s a world I cannot imagine, but as to today’s welcome . . . enjoy the fotos.

Just the facts: one of two, designed by Naval Architects Robert Allan LTD.  The pressurized cabin offers protection against chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear contamination.  Dimensions:  140′ x 36′ x 9′ with four 2000 hp MTU diesels.  Screws are approximately two-meter diameter controllable pitch Hundestedts.  Crew of seven.  Top pump output:  50,000 gpm.  Price tag:  $27 million.

Many thanks to fireboat.org and the John J. Harvey for my ride.  Click here for google images (including bowsprite’s)  of the Harvey, and here for info on Jessica Dulong’s book, in which Harvey plays a pivotal role.  Harvey cranked up her own water display.

Our Lady (herself once damaged by a terror explosion in 1916) offered her welcome, and

rainbows arced hither and yon over the sixth boro, here created by John D. McKean.

The forward ballast tank allows 343 to lower the bow into the water to ease people transfer.

Once past the Statue, she passed Ellis Island and then

headed over toward Lower Manhattan, where

she paused,

placed a wreath for the three hundred forty-three firefighters who died in that event back in 2001, before

the three large FDNY boats diverged, here left to right, 343, Firefighter, and John D. McKean.

Welcome.  No one knows what events she faces.  I wish her an uneventful and boring life.

All fotos, Will Van Dorp.

For old salt’s perspective . . . click here.

For video of her launch at Eastern Ship Building in Panama City, Florida, click here.

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