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I did not forget in the beginning of April about the 2020 calendar enhancement;  there were just too any things going on! So today I both catch up, and get ahead.  And according to my accounting robot, today I post for the 4,500th time.  Champagne is spilling all over my editor’s floor, but he’s not sharing.

YM World came in last April as Anthem of the Seas was departing.  If one keeps records with the goal of tracking change, few industries have changed as profoundly as the cruise industry has in the past year, and all that in the past two months.

Truly YM World, an ULCV,is huge.  But earlier this week, MSC Anna sailed under the Golden Gate, over 100′ longer, almost 40′ wider, giving her a total teu capacity of over 19k, compared with around 14k here.  That 5000 teu difference equals the total capacity of an average container ship serving the sixth boro 10 years ago.

 

The May calendar page features James D Moran nosing up against a pink magenta wall.

Here she comes in to meet off the starboard side.

Then she matches speed

and comes alongside to drop off the docking pilot.

All photos, WVD.

 

 

Tightrope?

 

This ULCV shows 17 containers across.

It’s a bit surprising to see a Moran 6000 on starboard bow, also on a “tight rope.”

YM Evolution . . . without counting the rows of containers, does it look less beamy?

It is  . . . 15 across.  By contrast, CMA CGM Amerigo Vespucci, the other day here, carries 20 across.

All photos, WVD.

 

As coronavirus spasms across the globe, affecting all aspects of public activity, container ship runs has been blanked.  But you would not guess so from the string of CMA CGM vessels that came in one sunny day last week.  La Traviata rounded the bend just before 1100.

The teu capacity of this 2006-built ship is said to be 8488 containers.

She was so light that the prop wash splashed froth to the surface.

Ten minutes later CMA CGM Thames appeared.

Thames carries 9200 containers, and was built in 2015.  I’ve never seen either Thames or La Traviata in the sixth boro, which does not mean they’ve not called here before.

 

A few hours later, a third CMA CGM vessel arrived . . . Amerigo Vespucci, one I had previously seen.

The 2010 Vespucci has capacity of 13,344 containers.  She one of the 1200′ vessels that now regularly call here.

That totals to 31,032 teu container capacity represented by a single fleet transiting inbound in less than a quarter of a day!  And to do some math here, that’s about 117 miles of containers stacked end to end, ie., the distance from the Staten Island St. George Terminal to the Delaware Memorial Bridge.

For some perspective, a Korean company will begin operating the largest teu vessels to date . . . 24,000 teu.

So like I said, last week I did not sense that container ship sailings were slowing, which does not mean they are not.

All photos, WVD.

Unrelated:  A new word for a wasteful and polluting practice is coming from pandemic  . . . they’re called ghost flights . . .  Here‘s more on why airlines choose to fly these almost empty planes.

I knew it was coming.  VHF chatter alluded to it.  AIS showed it.  And for going on 10 minutes I’d heard it . . . sound, at intervals of not more than two minutes, a prolonged blast, of which I’d heard no fewer than five . . .

Then in addition to the chest-penetrating blasts, I became aware of a low rpm throbbing. When the bow first appeared, it came with no hint of what followed.

A gray ship on a mild but foggy winter’s day . . . its size seems exaggerated.  It was so foggy that Bergen Point was closed to all traffic over a certain tonnage, although waivers could be requested and granted.

 

The white bridge remained invisible.

 

It seemed the vessel tiptoed out,

restrained by the Moran tug.

And after she had passed, the stern remained visible as the bow blended into the fog.  The fog horn, now oriented away, seemed to have moved much farther than the ship had.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Looking, seeing . . . but not understanding makes me wonder if I’ve missed stuff before.  Am I dense, or is that something I don’t recall noticing before.  See it too?

Here’s the rest of the vessel with the (I believe) unusually high mast.  And as large as this bulk carrier is, she seems disproportionately small

as the ULCV passes behind her.  More on that ULCV in another post.

Below is what I meant by the initial question:  notice the yellow quarantine flag?  Is that common?  Is it required for all vessels needing to clear into the US after they arrive in the  sixth boro?  AIS showed that the Monrovia-flagged Alerce N was arriving here directly from Santiago Cuba, (CU-SCU) and that I believe is unusual.

As I said, I miss stuff because I don’t understand what I’m seeing.  And here’s another puzzling sight below . . .

does that mast seem strangely articulated?

It’s the forward mast on Gustav Maersk.  Is it possible that an extension top section has been added?

And since I’m professing a lot of ignorance today . . .does anyone have the definitive explanation for this hulk off Clason Point in the Bronx neighborhood of Shorehaven ?  Over a decade ago, jeff s commented as follows:  “its CHRISTINA or CRISTINA, a failed project…. to be an eatery in Philadelphia but abandoned.”  I’d still love to hear more.

All photos and questions by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are the previous posts in the series.

The bow of the ship, the park, and Newark International tower could establish the location, as could

the stern of the ship and the signage on the bridge lower right.

How many tugboats do you spot?  What do you now about them and the ship from colors and livery?

How near are the tugboats one from the other?

Here’s a digression . . . two models of shipping in 2019.

Here’s exactly the same shot.  Here‘s the info on Arthur Maersk.

Alex here appears to be mirroring the forward motion of Arthur, while simultaneously pulling her to starboard and in the channel.  I’m sure the folks who do this might have other words and other descriptions of what is happening here.

Meanwhile, Ava (rhymes with Java) pushes on the stern, and

compared with photos 3 and 4 above, notice how far apart along the starboard side of Arthur the two tugboats are.  And the fishing boat, just to the left of the red buoy, is several hundred feet off.

Alex continues force along the same vector.

All photos and words by Will Van Dorp, whose admiration for this oft-repeated maneuver around Bergen Point hasn’t diminished.

 

An unrelated question to begin:  Have you kissed or do you know Resusci Anne, aka the most-kissed face of all time?  I’ve kissed her more than once.  Answer at the end of the post.

Some of you can conclude a lot from this shot: the type of vessel, the company, the location the ship, and maybe even what part of an evolution this is.

On the other hand, a lot is unknowable:  who are those three people, their nationalities, their lives, their specific livelihoods…   And those containers, what do they contain, their provenance, age, and destination.  And those initials . . .  in this age of weighty four-letter abbreviations . . . what are these four letters?

How many boxes are on this vessel?  How many places are they headed?  Where are those places, and of what import to their lives is the contents of those containers or the arrival of the containers in terms of what they’ll fill it with in the coming months?

If this vessel draws 40′ through the KVK, what would be the experience of a bottom-dwelling fish as it passes above its habitat?  What would this passage look like from 1000′ directly above?  Would there be a mud swirl visible, stirred up by the turning of the huge prop?

And then, there are questions of scale in the harbor and numbers of vessels that come and go and from how many ports and who these crews are . . ..  Here’s a relatively unknown story about a ship’s cook who visited NYC and left the vessel for a while just over a century ago and if he’d stayed, history might be different . . .

Getting back to scale . . .  part of the story here is foreshortening and proximity.

I’ve been doing this mostly-daily blog for well over a decade now, and although I’ve learned a lot, there’s so much that will just be unknowable, and simultaneously, that fact makes me consider discontinuing the effort and persisting to try to understanding it better.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thanks you for reading these posts and looking at the photos.   I don’t think I would be continuing if the subject matter were NYC roadways and vehicles that use them . . . .

For some certainties on these three ships, here are the numbers:  CMA CGM Aquila  is 1190′ x 159′   Dubai Charm is 820′ x 144′   and Atlantic T is 590′ x 108′;  all three are about 10 years old.

If you’ve ever taken a CPR course, you too have kissed Resusci Anne.  I stumbled upon the story yesterday, then read some accounts here and here, and found it too good NOT to share.   Learn to save a life;  kiss Resusci Anne.

 

I couldn’t leave the earlier post from today dangling as I did.

It was ONE Ibis, the most recent in the series I’ve seen.

 

 

The pink is so vivid that the pink M on James D appears de-colored.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who has focused on other birds here.

Related:  At 14,000 teu, these ONE ships are small compared with the latest ones contracted by Samsung for Evergreen . . . giants at 23,000 teu.

 

 

I know others witnessed dawn this morning as the big pink ship came in . . . .

By the way, if you were naming this ONE “bird” ULCV based on this morning’s color, which bird

would

you choose?  Nah . . . it wasn’t that.  More later.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

The Canadas and I were attentive, but it was really just another ULCV.  This was was named for Columbus’ detractor.  Ironically, Maersk Columbus will be arriving in the sixth boro today.

It struck me as remarkable that in spite of the number of containers visible–and of course many more are invisible–Vespucci rode fairly high in the water.  My read on the forward draft markings show just over 25′ draft. Maybe you read it the same?

In this article from four years ago, Vespucci would be listed among the top 10 largest classes on container vessels in the world, by teu.

 

 

See the red “fenders” on the stern quarter?  I first noticed them here a few years ago . . . turns out they are anti-pirate gear.  There’s a link to the inventors in  that post, and here’s a link to the manufacturer.

If you’re new to this blog, container ship capacity is rated in a unit called t. e. u. (twenty-foot equivalents).  Most containers are either 20′ or 40′ long, standard dimensions for efficiency’s sake. Containers are used to ship just about anything, but let’s for this conversation’s sake say a container is full of shoe boxes, which themselves can be moved in a shopping cart.  A standard shopping cart is rated at 4.4 cubic feet of volume.  A standard container is 1172 cubic feet, given the dimensions above.  My math then comes up with 267 shopping carts per container.  That adds up to over 3.6 million shopping carts of stuff on Vespucci, rated at 13,830 teu.  End-to-end with no space between the carts . . . that line of carts would stretch farther than NYC to Albuquerque along the roads!!

 

This 2010 vessel carries 20 containers across, and compare that to

CMA CGM Marlin (photo taken in September 2009) with 13 containers across.  Here are some recent posts featuring CMA CGM boats.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who suggests you keep an eye on ONE Stork, currently in Bayonne.

By the way, I was traveling when S/V Amerigo Vespucci  was last here in 2017.  Anyone get pics?

 

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