You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘tugboat Jupiter’ tag.

Consider this a post in the genre of stacks and wheels. The fourth photo is the latter post shows 12 hands on these wheels, and no one seated.   Someone once said you stand (not sit) watch.

This canoe livery motorboat used in Algonquin Provincial Park has a flat aluminum seat, no cushion.

No seats here either.  I believe this is an oyster dredge mast unstepped.

Tugboat Jupiter has a old-style steering and an old style stool, not surprising given that it dates from 1901.

The once-padded barber’s (dentist’s?) chair shouldn’t really count here because it

complements this wheel aboard Frying Pan, a much modified vessel now floating pub.

So now let’s go standard contemporary.  Thanks to Xian Herrou, behold the seating aboard Abeille Camargue, now VB Camargue, a French tug built in 2007.  Here a seat is essential to operating the controls.

Here’s the note from Phil Porteus, who inspired this post when he wrote:  “The Eric R. Thornton is rocking a new helm seat from Ocean Air Inc, Gainesville FL.  The [builder] is a chief engineer on a processing ship in Alaska and builds these in his spare time. They are very very heavy duty and will last a lifetime.”

“He uses a Nylatrol bushing that will last the life of the chair. The design incorporates an automotive style seat which can easily be replaced if the seat gets damaged or worn out.  He gave me a discount, because I told him I would try and promote his product.”

“His cell is 206-409-9881.  Let me know if you want to come and sit in it:)”

Thanks, Phil and Xian.  More seats of power to come.

Unless otherwise attributed, all photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

The Yahoo tugboat groups has recently hosted an interesting discussion on “oldest” tugs in the United States, North America, or US-built.  Here’s a batch I’ve seen in the past year.

Baltimore . . . 1906, afloat in Baltimore.

Rose . . . 1906,  afloat in Camden, NJ.

Jupiter . . . 1901, afloat in Philadelphia.

Pegasus . . . 1907,  afloat in Jersey City.

Urger . . . 1901, working near Albany.   I took this foto in Lyons in February.

New York Central No. 13 . . . 1887,  ashore on Staten Island.

I’d love to see recent fotos of the following:  Fanny J, 1874, probably in Haiti;  Tramp, 1874; Rustler, 1886; Jill Marie, 1889; and Spanky Paine, 1892.  Many boats much younger than all those mentioned here have been scrapped or left to linger in graveyards.

All fotos in this post by Will Van Dorp, taken in 2010.  Last time I had a batch adding up to 550 years.

Unrelated but a “must-see” is the current exhibit at Atlantic Gallery called “Water”  which features work by 75 artists including Pamela Talese and the peripatetic bowsprite.

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