You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Triton’ tag.

Here, from a year ago, were previous Gmelin photos.

All I can tell about the photo below is that it shows Homeric, 1931.  Of the three tugs to her starboard and the six or so in the distance as well as the small sloop and stick lighter to the right . . . I can say nothing else and hope someone reading this will have some detail to add.

Six years earlier, some had criticized Capt. John Roberts for being unable–not unwilling–to rescue anyone from Raifuku Maru some 500 miles off Boston.

Homeric went eight years between keel-laying and entering service because a war intervened, then saw service for less than 20 years.

As was true for Homeric, RMS Empress of Australia was built in the German shipyard now located in Poland.  This Empress of Australia was launched in 1913;  Kaiser Wilhelm II made her into the royal yacht, imagining he would receive the surrendered allied fleets from her.  Oh well . . .

Other details here on the photo marked 1931 . . .  to the right behind the ship I can see a pier marked Ellerman’s Wilson Line, although I don’t know what pier number that would be.  And on the stern of the assist tug I can make out  the Howard portion of  . . . Howard C. Moore, a Moran boat by then.

My point is that visual detail and charm notwithstanding, there’s a vacuum of fact in these photos.

Which brings me to a book I reread yesterday and would recommend–Sailors, Waterways, and Tugboats I Have Known–although the title is bulky.  The author–Capt. Fred G. Godfrey, who also wrote a novel Fugitive Deckhand–though born ashore, lived from infancy on a canal barge his parents operated in the New York Canal system.  In the first chapter, he mentions the first tugboat he ever rode aboard, a Buffalo-built 1899 steam tug named Triton.  He was four then, and then later he worked aboard as a deckhand and cook.  To be fair, Godfrey included three photos of Triton, but I wanted more, although his details about the galley of a tug of a century ago are rich.   In chapter two, he writes about George Field, an 1882 Buffalo-built tug his father captained.   And again, there were two pictures, and I wanted more, although the anecdote of the time he intervened–as a kid–and shoved a helmsman bent on sabotaging the boat  . . . is great.    Third chapter  . . . it’s Junior Murphy, built 1909 in New Baltimore NY.  Again, two photos of the boat are included as well as info about cargoes–including hay– and ports of call that included St.-Jean -sur-Richelieu, QC.

I read this book a few years ago before I’d gained familiarity with these waterways and it was unsatisfying.  Now I know most of the references, and I want a thousand more photos and would have loved to converse with Capt. Godfrey.

I’m not being whiney.  I love the Gmelin photos and the Godfrey books. In fact, if anyone wants to trade some vintage photos of tugboats for my second copy of Sailors, Waterways, and Tugboats . . ., let me know.

I hope a satisfying record remains for the readers and researchers working here in 2117.

 

 

 

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Really random means photos from widely separated places by different people.  So here goes . . . the first two from Jed, who took them in the former Dutch Antilles about a year ago.  Triton is home-ported in Ijmuiden, another must-see place in the Netherlands if you’re interested in workboats. Click here for some posts I did about Ijmuiden, the mouth of the waterway out to sea from Amsterdam. Click here for a photo of Triton I took a few years back in Ijmuiden.

photo date 23 APRIL 2016

photo date 23 APRIL 2016 by Jed

Andicuri, named for a beach which itself is named for an Arawak chief,  was built just south of Rotterdam in 1983.

photo date 23 APRIL 2016

photo date 23 APRIL 2016 by Jed

Until about a year ago, Sand Master worked out of the sixth boro mining sand;  recently it was sold to interests and was spotted–not photographed–in Surinam.

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photo date January 2012 by Will Van Dorp

Here’s a strange photo taken in April 2012 by Don Rittner, and part of a post called “Jets Along the Mohawk.”  Maybe I should have called it “early Cold War jets up the Flight of Five.”

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And finally, here’s a photo I took in Beaufort NC in June 2013, Fort Macon tied up near the phosphate dock.

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I hope you enjoyed these bounces within the northern half of the American hemisphere.

 

I’m back at the helm and have switched the robots off.  I’ve been in Netherlands (Nederland, in the language), which translates as “low lands.”  Where it’s low, you find water, of course, and where you have water, you’ll find boats and bridges.

You also find moats.  See the jagged blue rectangle in map below showing the center–the historical starting point–of the city of Leiden, a city of 122,000 midwayish between Rotterdam and Amsterdam.  All the photos in this post show one” block” of the Nieuwe Rijn (New Rhine), attached to the Oude (old) Rijn.   In fact, the Nieuwe Rijn (NR) is only a little over a mile channelized portion of the Oude Rijn, a 30-mile stretch of river no longer attached to the Rhine, the 750-mile river that everyone knows.  Think oxbow lakes along the Mississippi, only straight.

Imagine the blue rectangle as a clock;  you locate this one-block area on the map below at around the 4:00 position of the moat, at the intersection of the NR and the Herrengracht, a main vertical canal you can see there.

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At this intersection there’s this old fuel barge.

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I don’t know if it still functions.

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Here’s the real focus of this post, low airdraft tugs like Jason.  The wheelhouse roof and windows are hinged, as you can see in this short video where Jason tows a barge through one of these low bridges.

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See the blue/white sign near the left center;  it reads “Herrengracht.”  I love the paint job on that Smart.

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The blue tour boats are operated by a company called “bootjes en broodjes,” or small boats and rolls.

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Eat. Drink. Tour.   Also, learn about Leiden.  Talk.  Duck!

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And among low air draft tugs in this block of waterway, here’s the real focus, the tug on the waterside of the small covered barge is called Triton.

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Notice the fuel barge and Jason?   In a lot of places in the waterways in Leiden, those smooth but curved top barges have seating on them as bars and restaurants.

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Here’s Triton with a house to get out of the weather.  She’s 100 years old exactly, a mere youngster compared with the buildings surrounding the waterways.

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Triton reminds me a lot of Augie and Heidi.

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Now if the spelling “rijn” seemed familiar, think of this guy . . . a favorite son whom we all know by his first name, Rembrandt.

Many more Dutch photos to come;  remember this is just one block of waterway. All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Sail Amsterdam ended a month ago, but these photos come from a relative who works for Dutch law enforcement and could mingle freely with his vessel.  Thanks cousin.

New Yorkers should easily recognize this vessel, in spite of some slightly different trappings.

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Guayas, the Ecuadorian tall ship, called in the sixth boro three years ago.  

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Guayas was assisted by Aaron on the bow.  Can anyone identify the tug hanging on the stern?  Aaron appeared here once a year ago.

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Sirius is an Iskes tug that outpowers Aaron by about four-fold.

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Steam tug Scheelenkuhlen (70′ x 21′ x 6′ draft and 65 tons) dates from 1927.

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Anny, built 1957, has a telescoping wheelhouse visible here and works Amsterdam’s canals, as seen here.

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A876 Hunze, launched 1987, is one of five large tugs operated by the Royal Dutch Navy.

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Shipdock VI measures 52′ x 13.’

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I can’t tell you much about Jan.

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Voorzan III dates from 1932.  Stadt Amsterdam has called in the sixth boro several times.

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Triton 2008 is another Iskes tug. 

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They’re all beauties . . . from Zeetijger to

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Maasstroom.

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And this has to be a tanker that delights when she calls into port at the end of the day.

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Let’s call it quits for today with a tug operated by the Port of Amsterdam . . . PA5 aka Pollux

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All photos by “Hans Brinker.”

Arion is one of the smaller Iskes tugs, here towing City of Dubrovnik out toward the mouth aka Ijmond of the North Sea Canal. 

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Aaron is the smallest of the fleet.

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Friesland . . . built 1982.

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Here’s another shot of Triton (farther) and Telstar (nearer).

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Another shot of Triton, built 2008 in Turkey.

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Pollux (Germany built in 1963) and Saturnus (Germany 1978).

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Svitzer Svezia, Italy 1988.

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PA 1 aka Castor looks like it could tow if equipment were added, but it’s actually an enforcement vessel.

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And we end with a 1927 boat . . . aptly named . . . Obsessie.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I certainly saw great assist tugs like Triton, here steering a bulk carrier into the locks at Ijmuiden.  Click here for more Iskes tugs.

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Louise van der Wees is less new.

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Devotion is an Urk-based vessel working a mini-heavy lift unit.

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But it was the sheer number of restored-to-operational-condition vintage tugs that impressed me, like the 1946 SS. Gebr. Bever.   If that link is in Dutch, you can switch languages at the bottom.

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Ditto Roek, 1930.

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Spes . . . 1946

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Wouw

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Citius

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Wisent and many more.

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Here’s another shot of Elbe (former Maryland Pilots vessel) being passed by Hercules 1915 . . .  and we end this installment with

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a 1977 Hercules.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Personal note:  Today I begin an extended gallivant in northern and western New York, the state.  I have many more Dutch photos, but my ability to post may be limited.

 

Here was the first in this series, the result of watching an old movie featuring Yul Brenner and Marlon Brando.  What I let fall through the cracks is this identification from someone who sent this foto, the source of which I didn’t know until now.  The tug–supposedly in Tokyo–was actually Wilmington Transportation tug Long Beach.  Click on the foto to see the source.  So is this Revell model the same boat?

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New business . . . the other night I watched another movie Losers for its tugboat content . . . and here are some screen captures.  In the movie, this scene was SAID to be Los Angeles.

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Here’s a closeup from the movie.  Note the “stairstepping” of wheelhouse windows.

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Here’s my foto taken in March of those same “stairstepped” window line as seen from inside.

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Here’s the classy wheelhouse complete with

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this fancy tiller belonging to this aquaclydesdale formerly known as Tuscarora.

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Actually, she works in San Juan now.  The movie folks changed the port name, but not

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the vessel name.

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If you are interested in learning more about a film project in NYC’s sixth boro, I am passing along notification that a TV reality show producer named Lance Schultz will be in town on Tuesday, April 30 interviewing candidates for a series.  I am in no way involved and won’t be there.  The person to contact is John Doswell   john [at] doswellproductions [dot] com . . .  John will be able to fill you n.

Check out more of Zane Johnston’s flickr fotos here.  Non-film fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s the entrance to San Juan Bay . . . Freja Taurus passing the #2 red under rain driven by 15+ knot wind out of the north.

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OK . . . Elizabeth snapped this foto . . . that’s my “focused” look as I huddle–like the ghost of a century-ago Spanish soldier– out of the rain behind  the bottom level of El Morro.

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Here’s the aforepromised foto of Beth M. McAllister (ex-YTB-805), three years and two months younger than the sixth boro’s own Ellen McAllister.  Both Beth and Ellen were built in Wisconsin.

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Don Raul came out of an Ohio shipyard exactly five years ago . . . now operating for Borinken Towing and Salvage .  .  .

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drifting in and

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towing a fuel barge.

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Getting back to the first two fotos, once inside, Handy Three takes Freja Taurus‘ bow.

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OK . . . another view of Beth at the dock.

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PRT’s Triton  (ex-AT-77) is a 72-year-old Texas-built workhorse, just recently involved in the rescue of ex-Smit Rotterdam . . . foto later in this post.

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And here’s my quite-poor foto of ex-Smit Rotterdam. . . .  now called Global Destiny.   Here’s more story on the rescue that brought Global Destiny into San Juan harbor.    She’s since headed south and east, but I really wish I’d caught this monster headed out the mouth of the Bay past El Morro.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated . . . here’s a foto of a Smit tug in the sixth boro of NYC a few decades back with a quite famous tow called Peking.

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