You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Tony Acabono’ tag.

To follow up on my “inconsistent post-entitling” comment from yesterday, this could be Tony A 31, at least, given all his previous contributions here under a variety of noms de keyboard.

For starters, here’s another closeup of Highland Eagle. Last summer the boat was contracted to survey an area near the Straits of Mackinac for a controversial tunnel project, a pipeline tunnel.  Currently it’s working for the Sunrise Wind project.

Tony also sends along the closest up photo I’ve yet seen of Kodi, at 43′ loa on the smaller size of tugs in the sixth boro, its tall upper wheelhouse notwithstanding.

Thanks, Tony.

A top hat tip to my eagle eyed collaborators in and around the sixth boro . . .

Here are previous “big one” posts.

See those marking on the base portion of that vertical structure behind the RV?

this is a mighty high-reaching crane base painted like a giraffe’s neck.   It’s actually a perfect paint job for these amazing lifts.

Painters in a second lift are applying the giraffe-camouflage.  I wonder where this large faux giraffe will raise its neck?  Anyone know?

Remember this surprising “cruise ship giraffe”?

And speaking of cruise ships–and more in that photo–behold from the cliffs of NJ . . .   Norwegian Encore, a brand spanking new cruise ship.  Christening will be later this month in Miami.  She has about 6000 beds.

What else I see down there is Chandra B, USCGC Campbell, and a bunker barge accompanied by Fort McHenry.

Many thanks to Tony Acabono and Phil Little for these photos.

When Sea Coast towed a barge through the boro the other day, Tony A snapped the next two photos and shared them with me.  And I’m very grateful he did.

You recognize the cargo on this deck barge?  That’s Kings Point in the background.

And from Norman Brouwer, here are some closer up shots he took in New London CT.

The boat dates from 1925, it’s on its way to French & Webb to be restored, and  . . .

 

. . . see the real seal . . . that used to be the presidential yacht.  There’s some interesting info about the boat in the link in the previous sentence.  It was the “floating White House” of a simpler time, and even POTUS 39 regrets having sold it out of the government as an attempt to downsize US executive regality.

Many thanks to Tony and Norman for use of their photos.

For some other Mathis-built boats previously appearing on this blog, click here.

 

 

With momentum gaining for more offshore wind farms, a raft of seldom-seen type vessels make port calls in the sixth boro.  This photo from Tony Acabono is an excellent example:  Geosea is not new, but she’s surely exotic.

Another from Tony, Berto L. Miller is new in town, joining two other Miller OSVs sometimes here, Rana and Josephine K.

And yet another set from Tony . . .  recognize this vessel?

Look at the design on the stack . .. .

It’s the return of Bear, as I first knew her, although she’s also been Catherine M. Brown and Elizabeth Anna.

And finally . . . here’s a photo of a vessel--Lois Ann L. Moran and barge Philadelphia–as seen from the “vessel,” the whatever-it-is in Hudson Yards. Those are LIRR trains in the foreground.  Thanks to my sister for this photo.

Thanks to Tony and my sister for these photos.  No photos here by Will Van Dorp, who is again off across the border.

The first photo here comes thanks to Tony A.  Shelia Bordelon has been on this blog before;  I believe she has now left the area, mission accomplished.

Fugro Enterprise has been here before also, that time on a day that the red did not photograph well.  This morning she headed out to sea, mission ongoing, i believe.

Neptune (1977) is a first timer on this blog;  the past few days she’s been docked in Bayonne.  Since 1977, she’s had more names than  . . .   Steve Earle has had spouses!!  If you don’t know Earle, sample this.  I enjoy his music and don’t mean to disparage him, but he’s just been married a lot.

And finally, another from Tony A, Conti (2005) is a platform supply vessel that’s been in the New York Bight for some time now.

Thanks to Tony for sending along these photos.

For more specialized vessels like these featured on this blog, click here.  The exotics category overlaps somewhat here; click here for the exotics appearing on this blog.

 

It’s mid afternoon, and what’s this?  In past years, I’ve posted photos discharging coal in the harbor, loading scrap away from the dock, and lightering salt.

Midmorning earlier I’d seen Frances slinging a scow out of Duraport, but I had  no clue

where she was headed.

Until some hours later.  Frances here delivers an empty scow to starboard of SBI Phoebe.

And here’s a split second after the top photo.  Any guesses on cargo and its provenance?

Frances stays busy, delivering an empty and taking a load to Duraport.  Must be lightering.

Thanks to Tony A who was passing Duraport in the wee hours, 0123 to be precise, now we know SBI Phoebe was being lightened so that it could complete discharging here.

So are your guesses ready as to cargo and origin?

It’s sand from Egypt, a raw material they have lots of.  But what makes Egyptian sand worthy of being transported across the sea and ocean?  Salt content or lack of it?

Many thanks to Capt. Tony for his night photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

This post follows up on Whatzit 36 . . . here.

Yup, it’s more parts for “the vessel.”

The two photos above come from Tony Acabono.  The rest come from Will Van Dorp.

Here Emily Ann moves some parts on Witte 1402 westbound, which confused me until I understood the routes.

 

So the parts arrive in USA/sixth boro from an Italian port on the Gulf of Trieste via a ship calling in Bayonne. Then they are stored in Port Newark until all efforts converge on getting

them here . . .

over in the the section of midtown Manhattan aka Hudson Yards, yards as in

train yards just of the west side of Penn Station Manhattan.  And there,

this monster called “the vessel” has begun rising.  At that link, you find a great slideshow featuring both with DonJon equipment and heavy lift trucks.

Since we’re talking public art, here is more I’ve seen recently . . .  Dale Chihuly’s blown glass creations displayed in the New York Botanical Garden, now until late October 2017.

Here’s more info on NYBG.

Then there’s this–which I just noticed yesterday– in Rockefeller Center, and which thankfully comes down after today . . . a 45′ gas balloon where the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree stands in late fall/early winter . . ..

Many thanks to Tony for his photos;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

It turns out, I’ve done a post like this once before . . .  in 2012 here.  When I took the next two photos on Tuesday, I’d thought all the fleet week vessels had already departed.  Well, wrong . . . there went LHD-3 USS Kearsarge . . .

which reminded me this would be

a good time to use a photo by a jolly tar back about 10 years ago.  Notice the long-gone, long transformed Odin bunkering LHD-3….

Mid afternoon Tuesday this was a sight to behold along the East River, here approaching the Williamsburg Bridge . . . whatzit?

It’s another of the fleet leaving town . . . USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8).  The photo above and next two come from an alert Tony A doing his commerce on the East River.  In the photo below, it’s the green-fronted UN Building along with river with Trump Tower (dark) rising behind it.

When I caught notice of this, I thought I could hurry to Fort Wadsworth to catch photos of Yuma with Manhattan behind it, but my underestimation of  EPF’s speed and the coincidence of hitting every stoplight on Bay Terrace meant that when I got to the Fort,

Yuma was already making almost two dozen knots and headed for Norfolk, a trip that took less than 24 hours.

The EFTs are a further evolution of the HSTs, which I posted about here. By the way, Alakai was renamed USNS Puerto Rico, but then later that name was removed, since there’s a new EFT with the name USNS Puerto Rico in the offing.   So is the former Alakai now nameless?

Many thanks to Tony A for sending along the East River photos. Thanks to JED for the Odin/USS Kearsarge shot, and all the others by Will Van Dorp.

Happy June!

It’s not just mea culpa.  I’ve done it, you have too, most likely.  “What?” you ask?  I’ll get to that.

Foreshortening does make for dramatic photos.  And that looks like a spare prop high up on the port side deck.

Watch out there, Madame Mallard . . .

What would Captain Ahab make of this profile?  Onyx Arrow was in port for less than a half day yesterday, arriving from Halifax and Europe before that.  Early afternoon I got these photos of her leaving town…

So this “we’re all at fault” title in Latin above?   We’ve all hit animals while driving:  birds, bats, other folks’ pets, turtles . . .  I’ve never hit a deer, but over a million are hit on US highways each year . . . .

Here’s what I’m getting at . . . see it on the bulbous bow?  Here’s more info on ship strikes . . .

It’s sad to see . . . like deer along the highway, but mitigation seems not so easy.  I know of a sailboat sailing with no engine running that hit one that may have been asleep on the surface . . .  middle of the night.

The last two photos come thanks to the always alert Tony A;  the others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Thanks to Tony A, whose previous contributions can be found here, here’s an insider’s view of a scrap ferrous metal run, starting with a view across the deep “hold” of the scow as it exits the Buttermilk heading for whichever of the sixth boro’s creeks has the product.

Once loaded, the scow is brought ship side.

Note the multiple load marks . . .

As the crane transfers the scrap into the hold of the ship, the tug may move to a safe distance or do another run.  By tomorrow, bulker Nichirin will be arriving in Iskenderun, Turkey, 15 miles from the Syrian border and less than 30 from Aleppo.

Photos I’ve taken over the years of scrap metals runs include these of Crow, in blue and

in red.

And here I think it’s Sarah Ann doing a really efficient run.

Thanks to Tony for the top four photos.  The bottom three are by Will Van Dorp.

And come to think of it, I wonder if the late great Crow has ended up in Iskenderun also….

 

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