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Happy 4th of July.  Here’s some sixth boro, some heartland, and some Pacific Northwest.  Here‘s the series.

But let’s start with Robert IV, a workhorse who last appeared in this blog here.

Hundreds of Cheyenne photos have appeared on this blog, showing her in a range of colors and trims; this photo was taken last week in Manitowoc by a Great Lakes mariner, who, by the way, at one time worked in the sixth boro.

Ellen McAllister has worked in the sixth boro longer than I’ve been taking photos here; as a result, hundreds of photos of her can be found here.

For a red-white-blue tug today, what could be better than a Nicholas Vinik photo.

 

An outa-towner has come through the sixth boro twice this week with an unusual bargeload;  bad decision-making means this is the best photo I got.  Sorry, Elizabeth Anne.  Did anyone get a better photo?  Any idea what the “marshmallow” load on that barge is?

Two of the tugs assisting in a Cosco Shipping ULCV, Brendan Turecamo and JRT Moran, seem small but bring adequate power to the task.

Another view of Cheyenne shows her location on the Manitowoc River, adjacent to Erich.

Thanks to Kyle Stubbs for sending along this photo of a raft of Boyer tugs.  L to r, it’s Sea, Billie H, Gretchen H, and Kirsten H.  You might have recognized Sea as the former Java Sea, a regular operating out of the sixth boro. Despite what’s on the bow, she’s now called Kinani H.  In the back row, that looks like Sonja H.

How about another red-white-blue boat for today?  This is from over 11 years ago. It’s the 1951 Dorothy Elizabeth, ex-Gotham, Christine Gellatly, Mobil 11, Socony 11.

To close out the set, Iron Salvor, a Vanuatu-flagged tug, is back in town. Anyone know her story . . . who she works for?

Many thanks to Great Lakes mariner, Kyle, and Tony A for some of these photos;  photos not otherwise attributed by WVD.

Hats off to all mariners today on National Maritime Day.  For key statistics from US DOT on role of mariners on US economy, click here.

If you want to see all the previous iterations of other peoples photos, click here . . . over a thousand photos, I’m sure. And I’m sure not going to count to know exactly.

From  Tony Acabono, here’s the latest tug to be called

Coney Island, the location of the mermaid parade, now postponed. Not cancelled. But back to the tug,  Coney Island has classic lines, and is a dozen years older than my jeepster!

From the Great Lakes Mariner, this photo was taken in 2017, before Paul McLernan and barge Kirby 155-02 made their way out of the Great Lakes to salt water.  She’s currently in the Gulf of Mexico.

Also from Great Lakes mariner, have a glance at Dutch steam tug Finland was built in 1919 just upstream from Rotterdam in Slikkerveer, and looks pristine.

And finally from my daughter Myriam D, here’s Luther and Calvin.  Those names make me look around for some more Protestants, like Zwingli and Hus . . .  I see the company does have a Wycliffe.

Want another shot of Luther with barge Santos?

Seaspan Rogue is a Canadian tug, although she‘s originally built in Serawak, Malaysia on the island of Borneo.

Island Viking  and Island Explorer (both built in 1970) operate for Island Tug and Barge and are former Crowley boats.

Polar Viking (4900 hp) and Polar Endurance (5000hp) appear to be in Dunlap Towing livery.

And the mother lode is last, the Boyer tugs.  You can read Kirsten W, Carolyn H, and Sonja H. Beyond Sonja,I’m guessing that’s Halle H.  And the treasure . . . beyond Carolyn H, the tug with the upper wheelhouse must be Marie H, formerly Adriatic Sea.  The former Java Sea is also in the Boyer fleet.

Tony and Great Lakes Mariner, many thanks.  Myriam, thank you and apologies for putting your photos in a folder and mislabeling it.

 

 

To follow up on my “inconsistent post-entitling” comment from yesterday, this could be Tony A 31, at least, given all his previous contributions here under a variety of noms de keyboard.

For starters, here’s another closeup of Highland Eagle. Last summer the boat was contracted to survey an area near the Straits of Mackinac for a controversial tunnel project, a pipeline tunnel.  Currently it’s working for the Sunrise Wind project.

Tony also sends along the closest up photo I’ve yet seen of Kodi, at 43′ loa on the smaller size of tugs in the sixth boro, its tall upper wheelhouse notwithstanding.

Thanks, Tony.

A top hat tip to my eagle eyed collaborators in and around the sixth boro . . .

Here are previous “big one” posts.

See those marking on the base portion of that vertical structure behind the RV?

this is a mighty high-reaching crane base painted like a giraffe’s neck.   It’s actually a perfect paint job for these amazing lifts.

Painters in a second lift are applying the giraffe-camouflage.  I wonder where this large faux giraffe will raise its neck?  Anyone know?

Remember this surprising “cruise ship giraffe”?

And speaking of cruise ships–and more in that photo–behold from the cliffs of NJ . . .   Norwegian Encore, a brand spanking new cruise ship.  Christening will be later this month in Miami.  She has about 6000 beds.

What else I see down there is Chandra B, USCGC Campbell, and a bunker barge accompanied by Fort McHenry.

Many thanks to Tony Acabono and Phil Little for these photos.

When Sea Coast towed a barge through the boro the other day, Tony A snapped the next two photos and shared them with me.  And I’m very grateful he did.

You recognize the cargo on this deck barge?  That’s Kings Point in the background.

And from Norman Brouwer, here are some closer up shots he took in New London CT.

The boat dates from 1925, it’s on its way to French & Webb to be restored, and  . . .

 

. . . see the real seal . . . that used to be the presidential yacht.  There’s some interesting info about the boat in the link in the previous sentence.  It was the “floating White House” of a simpler time, and even POTUS 39 regrets having sold it out of the government as an attempt to downsize US executive regality.

Many thanks to Tony and Norman for use of their photos.

For some other Mathis-built boats previously appearing on this blog, click here.

 

 

With momentum gaining for more offshore wind farms, a raft of seldom-seen type vessels make port calls in the sixth boro.  This photo from Tony Acabono is an excellent example:  Geosea is not new, but she’s surely exotic.

Another from Tony, Berto L. Miller is new in town, joining two other Miller OSVs sometimes here, Rana and Josephine K.

And yet another set from Tony . . .  recognize this vessel?

Look at the design on the stack . .. .

It’s the return of Bear, as I first knew her, although she’s also been Catherine M. Brown and Elizabeth Anna.

And finally . . . here’s a photo of a vessel--Lois Ann L. Moran and barge Philadelphia–as seen from the “vessel,” the whatever-it-is in Hudson Yards. Those are LIRR trains in the foreground.  Thanks to my sister for this photo.

Thanks to Tony and my sister for these photos.  No photos here by Will Van Dorp, who is again off across the border.

The first photo here comes thanks to Tony A.  Shelia Bordelon has been on this blog before;  I believe she has now left the area, mission accomplished.

Fugro Enterprise has been here before also, that time on a day that the red did not photograph well.  This morning she headed out to sea, mission ongoing, i believe.

Neptune (1977) is a first timer on this blog;  the past few days she’s been docked in Bayonne.  Since 1977, she’s had more names than  . . .   Steve Earle has had spouses!!  If you don’t know Earle, sample this.  I enjoy his music and don’t mean to disparage him, but he’s just been married a lot.

And finally, another from Tony A, Conti (2005) is a platform supply vessel that’s been in the New York Bight for some time now.

Thanks to Tony for sending along these photos.

For more specialized vessels like these featured on this blog, click here.  The exotics category overlaps somewhat here; click here for the exotics appearing on this blog.

 

It’s mid afternoon, and what’s this?  In past years, I’ve posted photos discharging coal in the harbor, loading scrap away from the dock, and lightering salt.

Midmorning earlier I’d seen Frances slinging a scow out of Duraport, but I had  no clue

where she was headed.

Until some hours later.  Frances here delivers an empty scow to starboard of SBI Phoebe.

And here’s a split second after the top photo.  Any guesses on cargo and its provenance?

Frances stays busy, delivering an empty and taking a load to Duraport.  Must be lightering.

Thanks to Tony A who was passing Duraport in the wee hours, 0123 to be precise, now we know SBI Phoebe was being lightened so that it could complete discharging here.

So are your guesses ready as to cargo and origin?

It’s sand from Egypt, a raw material they have lots of.  But what makes Egyptian sand worthy of being transported across the sea and ocean?  Salt content or lack of it?

Many thanks to Capt. Tony for his night photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

 

This post follows up on Whatzit 36 . . . here.

Yup, it’s more parts for “the vessel.”

The two photos above come from Tony Acabono.  The rest come from Will Van Dorp.

Here Emily Ann moves some parts on Witte 1402 westbound, which confused me until I understood the routes.

 

So the parts arrive in USA/sixth boro from an Italian port on the Gulf of Trieste via a ship calling in Bayonne. Then they are stored in Port Newark until all efforts converge on getting

them here . . .

over in the the section of midtown Manhattan aka Hudson Yards, yards as in

train yards just of the west side of Penn Station Manhattan.  And there,

this monster called “the vessel” has begun rising.  At that link, you find a great slideshow featuring both with DonJon equipment and heavy lift trucks.

Since we’re talking public art, here is more I’ve seen recently . . .  Dale Chihuly’s blown glass creations displayed in the New York Botanical Garden, now until late October 2017.

Here’s more info on NYBG.

Then there’s this–which I just noticed yesterday– in Rockefeller Center, and which thankfully comes down after today . . . a 45′ gas balloon where the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree stands in late fall/early winter . . ..

Many thanks to Tony for his photos;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

It turns out, I’ve done a post like this once before . . .  in 2012 here.  When I took the next two photos on Tuesday, I’d thought all the fleet week vessels had already departed.  Well, wrong . . . there went LHD-3 USS Kearsarge . . .

which reminded me this would be

a good time to use a photo by a jolly tar back about 10 years ago.  Notice the long-gone, long transformed Odin bunkering LHD-3….

Mid afternoon Tuesday this was a sight to behold along the East River, here approaching the Williamsburg Bridge . . . whatzit?

It’s another of the fleet leaving town . . . USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8).  The photo above and next two come from an alert Tony A doing his commerce on the East River.  In the photo below, it’s the green-fronted UN Building along with river with Trump Tower (dark) rising behind it.

When I caught notice of this, I thought I could hurry to Fort Wadsworth to catch photos of Yuma with Manhattan behind it, but my underestimation of  EPF’s speed and the coincidence of hitting every stoplight on Bay Terrace meant that when I got to the Fort,

Yuma was already making almost two dozen knots and headed for Norfolk, a trip that took less than 24 hours.

The EFTs are a further evolution of the HSTs, which I posted about here. By the way, Alakai was renamed USNS Puerto Rico, but then later that name was removed, since there’s a new EFT with the name USNS Puerto Rico in the offing.   So is the former Alakai now nameless?

Many thanks to Tony A for sending along the East River photos. Thanks to JED for the Odin/USS Kearsarge shot, and all the others by Will Van Dorp.

Happy June!

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