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Here were the first two installments of this series.  And what prompts this post is the news yesterday about a $200 million structure in the assembly stages just four years ago.  Click on the image below to see the post I did just four years ago.

It will be scrapped as announced yesterday here.  The physical disassembled parts will be sold as will portions of it non-fungible tokens (NFTs), whatever they are;  I can’t quite understand them even after reading this.  Doesn’t that sound like eating your cake and still having it?

You can’t save everything . . . as the next two photos from Tony A show . . . relative to the 1907 Pegasus. For comparison, check out Paul Strubeck’s thorough cataloging of the many lives of Pegasus through the many years. 

Here’s the engine that powered Pegasus for many years, originally from Landing Ship Tank, LST 121 , which itself lived only three years before being scrapped and the engine transplanted into Pegasus.

The next two photos come thanks to Steve Munoz.  The 1945 USS Sanctuary (AH-17) looked shabby here in Baltimore harbor in 1997;  it last until 2011, when it was scrapped in Brownsville, TX, then ESCO and now SteelCoast. 

Another photo from Steve shows SS Stonewall Jackson, a Waterman LASH vessel in the Upper Bay;  note the Staten Island ferries off the stern.    Scroll through and see Jackson on the beach in Alang in 2002.  Tug Rachel will arrive in Brownsville with Lihue, a very smiliar LASH vessel within a week;  she’s currently approashing the strait between Mexico and western Cuba.

Here’s a photo I took of the beautiful NS Savannah;  a recent MARAD public comment period on what should be done with her ended less than a month ago;  I’m not sure when the results will be publicly commented on.   

Sometimes preserved vessels change hands, as is the case with the 1936 Eagle, another photo from Steve Munoz taken in 1992.  

More on this tomorrow.  Many thanks to Tony and Steve for use of these photos.

Ship preservation is tough and costly.  Turning an almost-new metal structure into NFTs . . . just mind boggling.

 

 

 

I had something else for today, but  . . . Sea Power . . .changes everything.  No, this is NOT a post about assets of global military hegemony.  Instead, Sea Power is the name

of a huge tug that pushed Sea-Chem 1 into the sixth boro yesterday, and Tony Acabono sent along these photos of the unit arriving in the KVK. 

Here‘s another article on the completion of the barge in Erie PA, stressing the complexity of tank barge construction.

I recall back in 2016 when the tug just launched by BAE Systems Jacksonville FL traveled up the Saint Lawrence to DonJon Shipbuilding in Erie PA to pick up that 185,000 barrel barge. It’s not the largest tank barge or any type of barge, but you have to admit it’s pretty big.   OSG 350 is much larger.  And Presque Isle is bigger yet.  I saw Presque Isle passing Mackinac here a few years back.

12000 hp . . .  there have been a few other tug boats in the sixth boro with that kind of power, OSG has some like Vision and Crowley has some like Courage come to mind. US Shipping Corp. has four 12000 hp tugs as well:  Freeport, Corpus Christi, Brownsville, and Galveston.  Here‘s a 24400 hp tug.

This photo, which I took, shows what her overall length is. Entire profiles of long vessels do not interesting photos make.

Some detail shots of an icy bow unlike what you’d see in Port Everglades . . .

 

 

Anyone know Sea Power’s height of eye?

Many thanks to Tony for some of these photos.  All others . . . WVD, who wonders what crew number on Sea Power is. 

This is my first time to see a Seabulk vesssel in the sixth boro.  For a period of time, Yankee, which I first saw as a K-Sea boat,  was a Seabulk Towing vessel.

She’s still along the KVK as of post time.

 

A new tug in town . . .  Osprey?  Built in 1961, she’s a sibling of Kodi.  Photo thanks to Tony A.

B & B . . .  it’s Brendan Turecamo in the distance and Bruce A McAllister.  It turns out they are not clones:  Brendan is a year newer, and Bruce A. is few feet longer and packs a few more horses.

Curis Reinauer is the third tug to carry that name.  This Curtis dates from 2013.  The previous one was sold to Nigeria, and the one before that has been reefed.

Emily Ann dates from 1964;  she appeared on this blog just a few weeks ago but out of the water then.

Mister Jim, 1982,  has been in the sixth boro for about eight years. 

Doris Moran, also 1982, is a powerhouse.

Navigator, 1981, is the only boat currently operated by Balico Marine Services.

Gulf Coast, 1982, got her upper wheelhouse up at Feeney‘s on the Rondout.

Patrice, 1999, has so far spent half its life working on the Great Lakes.

Shannon McAllister is a rare one in the sixth boro, but she passes through here once in a while. like this week. She dates from 1991.

Thx to Tony for that first photo;  all others, WVD.

The smaller surprise was to see USCGC Beluga (WPB- 87325) traveling with speed from Sandy Hook into the Upper Bay. 

I don’t believe I’ve seen Beluga before, although she looks identical to the 70+ Protector class 87′ boats named for marine predators.  I didn’t realize that many marine predators existed, although once you start counting . . . they add up. More on parameters for replacing the WPBs here.

But what really surprised me was what Tony A mentioned about the blue/yellow vessel in the photo.  Of course, it’s R/VShearwater, the Alpine Ocean Seismic Survey boat that’s been creating a complex bathymetric picture of parts of the sixth boro.  I long thought she had an unusual design.  What I hadn’t known is

that she’s former USCG WSES-3.  WSES expands to “surface effects ships.”  Hull 1 of the WSES series, WSES-1, was built for the US Navy as 110BH, then modified and became USCGC Dorado, then back to the USN as SES-200 Sea Flyer, then IX-515.  That’s a lot of modification. More on that here (start near bottom of p 25) and here. For a photo of Shearwater, black hull and orange USCG stripe, click here.   For her Alpine tech specs, click here.

All photos, WVD, who enjoys learning from surprises.  Many thanks, Tony A.

Tony Acabono wrote me that he was confused, although maybe he was not.

As this approached and passed by, I was briefly confounded.

The shape reminded me immediately of a tidal power installation in the East River, which I’d written about here 12 years ago.

The three nodes of the structure on the barge are marked A, B, and  . . . as you see . . . C.

I got out ahead of it.  The main tug here is Harry McNeal, and alongside is Miss Julia.  I’m not sure who owns Miss Julia.

A tidal strait, which the East River technically is, with tides in first one and then another direction, will spin these turbines and generate electricity.  Winds may be variable and intermittent, but the tides never cease.

Verdant Power is the clue will get you much more info.  

The three turbines/blades are fitted into a triangular structure, a TriFrame.  It will be submerged in the East River as part of RITE, Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy project, as yet a pre-commercial operation.  Materials and design are being tested.

And finally, from the Tideland Institute, Julia, Harry, and the turbines eastbound, like some low-flying albino birds,  in the Buttermilk.

  Read gCaptain’s take here.

And how would you imagine the Tri-Frame got lowered to the bottom? 

Columbia specializes in lowering and raising.

This post reminds me of Whatzit 36 . . . from three and a half years ago.

Thanks to Tony, Tideland, and AC.  Photos not credited to others by WVD, who’s repeatedly astonished by the sixth boro surprises and complexity. 

Happy 4th of July.  Here’s some sixth boro, some heartland, and some Pacific Northwest.  Here‘s the series.

But let’s start with Robert IV, a workhorse who last appeared in this blog here.

Hundreds of Cheyenne photos have appeared on this blog, showing her in a range of colors and trims; this photo was taken last week in Manitowoc by a Great Lakes mariner, who, by the way, at one time worked in the sixth boro.

Ellen McAllister has worked in the sixth boro longer than I’ve been taking photos here; as a result, hundreds of photos of her can be found here.

For a red-white-blue tug today, what could be better than a Nicholas Vinik photo.

 

An outa-towner has come through the sixth boro twice this week with an unusual bargeload;  bad decision-making means this is the best photo I got.  Sorry, Elizabeth Anne.  Did anyone get a better photo?  Any idea what the “marshmallow” load on that barge is?

Two of the tugs assisting in a Cosco Shipping ULCV, Brendan Turecamo and JRT Moran, seem small but bring adequate power to the task.

Another view of Cheyenne shows her location on the Manitowoc River, adjacent to Erich.

Thanks to Kyle Stubbs for sending along this photo of a raft of Boyer tugs.  L to r, it’s Sea, Billie H, Gretchen H, and Kirsten H.  You might have recognized Sea as the former Java Sea, a regular operating out of the sixth boro. Despite what’s on the bow, she’s now called Kinani H.  In the back row, that looks like Sonja H.

How about another red-white-blue boat for today?  This is from over 11 years ago. It’s the 1951 Dorothy Elizabeth, ex-Gotham, Christine Gellatly, Mobil 11, Socony 11.

To close out the set, Iron Salvor, a Vanuatu-flagged tug, is back in town. Anyone know her story . . . who she works for?

Many thanks to Great Lakes mariner, Kyle, and Tony A for some of these photos;  photos not otherwise attributed by WVD.

Hats off to all mariners today on National Maritime Day.  For key statistics from US DOT on role of mariners on US economy, click here.

If you want to see all the previous iterations of other peoples photos, click here . . . over a thousand photos, I’m sure. And I’m sure not going to count to know exactly.

From  Tony Acabono, here’s the latest tug to be called

Coney Island, the location of the mermaid parade, now postponed. Not cancelled. But back to the tug,  Coney Island has classic lines, and is a dozen years older than my jeepster!

From the Great Lakes Mariner, this photo was taken in 2017, before Paul McLernan and barge Kirby 155-02 made their way out of the Great Lakes to salt water.  She’s currently in the Gulf of Mexico.

Also from Great Lakes mariner, have a glance at Dutch steam tug Finland was built in 1919 just upstream from Rotterdam in Slikkerveer, and looks pristine.

And finally from my daughter Myriam D, here’s Luther and Calvin.  Those names make me look around for some more Protestants, like Zwingli and Hus . . .  I see the company does have a Wycliffe.

Want another shot of Luther with barge Santos?

Seaspan Rogue is a Canadian tug, although she‘s originally built in Serawak, Malaysia on the island of Borneo.

Island Viking  and Island Explorer (both built in 1970) operate for Island Tug and Barge and are former Crowley boats.

Polar Viking (4900 hp) and Polar Endurance (5000hp) appear to be in Dunlap Towing livery.

And the mother lode is last, the Boyer tugs.  You can read Kirsten W, Carolyn H, and Sonja H. Beyond Sonja,I’m guessing that’s Halle H.  And the treasure . . . beyond Carolyn H, the tug with the upper wheelhouse must be Marie H, formerly Adriatic Sea.  The former Java Sea is also in the Boyer fleet.

Tony and Great Lakes Mariner, many thanks.  Myriam, thank you and apologies for putting your photos in a folder and mislabeling it.

 

 

To follow up on my “inconsistent post-entitling” comment from yesterday, this could be Tony A 31, at least, given all his previous contributions here under a variety of noms de keyboard.

For starters, here’s another closeup of Highland Eagle. Last summer the boat was contracted to survey an area near the Straits of Mackinac for a controversial tunnel project, a pipeline tunnel.  Currently it’s working for the Sunrise Wind project.

Tony also sends along the closest up photo I’ve yet seen of Kodi, at 43′ loa on the smaller size of tugs in the sixth boro, its tall upper wheelhouse notwithstanding.

Thanks, Tony.

A top hat tip to my eagle eyed collaborators in and around the sixth boro . . .

Here are previous “big one” posts.

See those marking on the base portion of that vertical structure behind the RV?

this is a mighty high-reaching crane base painted like a giraffe’s neck.   It’s actually a perfect paint job for these amazing lifts.

Painters in a second lift are applying the giraffe-camouflage.  I wonder where this large faux giraffe will raise its neck?  Anyone know?

Remember this surprising “cruise ship giraffe”?

And speaking of cruise ships–and more in that photo–behold from the cliffs of NJ . . .   Norwegian Encore, a brand spanking new cruise ship.  Christening will be later this month in Miami.  She has about 6000 beds.

What else I see down there is Chandra B, USCGC Campbell, and a bunker barge accompanied by Fort McHenry.

Many thanks to Tony Acabono and Phil Little for these photos.

When Sea Coast towed a barge through the boro the other day, Tony A snapped the next two photos and shared them with me.  And I’m very grateful he did.

You recognize the cargo on this deck barge?  That’s Kings Point in the background.

And from Norman Brouwer, here are some closer up shots he took in New London CT.

The boat dates from 1925, it’s on its way to French & Webb to be restored, and  . . .

 

. . . see the real seal . . . that used to be the presidential yacht.  There’s some interesting info about the boat in the link in the previous sentence.  It was the “floating White House” of a simpler time, and even POTUS 39 regrets having sold it out of the government as an attempt to downsize US executive regality.

Many thanks to Tony and Norman for use of their photos.

For some other Mathis-built boats previously appearing on this blog, click here.

 

 

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