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This post follows up on Whatzit 36 . . . here.

Yup, it’s more parts for “the vessel.”

The two photos above come from Tony Acabono.  The rest come from Will Van Dorp.

Here Emily Ann moves some parts on Witte 1402 westbound, which confused me until I understood the routes.

 

So the parts arrive in USA/sixth boro from an Italian port on the Gulf of Trieste via a ship calling in Bayonne. Then they are stored in Port Newark until all efforts converge on getting

them here . . .

over in the the section of midtown Manhattan aka Hudson Yards, yards as in

train yards just of the west side of Penn Station Manhattan.  And there,

this monster called “the vessel” has begun rising.  At that link, you find a great slideshow featuring both with DonJon equipment and heavy lift trucks.

Since we’re talking public art, here is more I’ve seen recently . . .  Dale Chihuly’s blown glass creations displayed in the New York Botanical Garden, now until late October 2017.

Here’s more info on NYBG.

Then there’s this–which I just noticed yesterday– in Rockefeller Center, and which thankfully comes down after today . . . a 45′ gas balloon where the Rockefeller Center Christmas tree stands in late fall/early winter . . ..

Many thanks to Tony for his photos;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

 

It turns out, I’ve done a post like this once before . . .  in 2012 here.  When I took the next two photos on Tuesday, I’d thought all the fleet week vessels had already departed.  Well, wrong . . . there went LHD-3 USS Kearsarge . . .

which reminded me this would be

a good time to use a photo by a jolly tar back about 10 years ago.  Notice the long-gone, long transformed Odin bunkering LHD-3….

Mid afternoon Tuesday this was a sight to behold along the East River, here approaching the Williamsburg Bridge . . . whatzit?

It’s another of the fleet leaving town . . . USNS Yuma (T-EPF-8).  The photo above and next two come from an alert Tony A doing his commerce on the East River.  In the photo below, it’s the green-fronted UN Building along with river with Trump Tower (dark) rising behind it.

When I caught notice of this, I thought I could hurry to Fort Wadsworth to catch photos of Yuma with Manhattan behind it, but my underestimation of  EPF’s speed and the coincidence of hitting every stoplight on Bay Terrace meant that when I got to the Fort,

Yuma was already making almost two dozen knots and headed for Norfolk, a trip that took less than 24 hours.

The EFTs are a further evolution of the HSTs, which I posted about here. By the way, Alakai was renamed USNS Puerto Rico, but then later that name was removed, since there’s a new EFT with the name USNS Puerto Rico in the offing.   So is the former Alakai now nameless?

Many thanks to Tony A for sending along the East River photos. Thanks to JED for the Odin/USS Kearsarge shot, and all the others by Will Van Dorp.

Happy June!

It’s not just mea culpa.  I’ve done it, you have too, most likely.  “What?” you ask?  I’ll get to that.

Foreshortening does make for dramatic photos.  And that looks like a spare prop high up on the port side deck.

Watch out there, Madame Mallard . . .

What would Captain Ahab make of this profile?  Onyx Arrow was in port for less than a half day yesterday, arriving from Halifax and Europe before that.  Early afternoon I got these photos of her leaving town…

So this “we’re all at fault” title in Latin above?   We’ve all hit animals while driving:  birds, bats, other folks’ pets, turtles . . .  I’ve never hit a deer, but over a million are hit on US highways each year . . . .

Here’s what I’m getting at . . . see it on the bulbous bow?  Here’s more info on ship strikes . . .

It’s sad to see . . . like deer along the highway, but mitigation seems not so easy.  I know of a sailboat sailing with no engine running that hit one that may have been asleep on the surface . . .  middle of the night.

The last two photos come thanks to the always alert Tony A;  the others by Will Van Dorp.

 

Thanks to Tony A, whose previous contributions can be found here, here’s an insider’s view of a scrap ferrous metal run, starting with a view across the deep “hold” of the scow as it exits the Buttermilk heading for whichever of the sixth boro’s creeks has the product.

Once loaded, the scow is brought ship side.

Note the multiple load marks . . .

As the crane transfers the scrap into the hold of the ship, the tug may move to a safe distance or do another run.  By tomorrow, bulker Nichirin will be arriving in Iskenderun, Turkey, 15 miles from the Syrian border and less than 30 from Aleppo.

Photos I’ve taken over the years of scrap metals runs include these of Crow, in blue and

in red.

And here I think it’s Sarah Ann doing a really efficient run.

Thanks to Tony for the top four photos.  The bottom three are by Will Van Dorp.

And come to think of it, I wonder if the late great Crow has ended up in Iskenderun also….

 

Tony A sent these first three photos.  What are they?

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Here’s the answer. I like the statement . .  the last one above water!  I wonder what else you can say that about.   Whalebacks have come and gone, except this one. Click here for a historical essay on whalebacks that makes an unexpected connection to Franklin D. Roosevelt. If your appetite is whetted, here’s another.   As the the connection between this style and x-bows, click here.

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Click here to see El Cheapo’s 4-minute video on whalebacks, including one that served as a passenger vessel. 

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Frisia Inn, which was in and out of the sixth boro a week or so ago,  is not a whaleback,

 

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but the bow shares some design features.

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It has the same bow as CSAV Rio de Janiero, Conrad S, and others.

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Turtle back?

For a number of great vintage whaleback images, click here for portions of Neel R. Zoss‘ book, McDougall’s Great Lakes Whalebacks, including a whaleback automobile carrier called . . . South Park.

Many thanks to Tony for the actual whaleback photos.  For a good closing story on a whaleback whose remnants lie 400 feet below the surface of the GOM, click here.   That whaleback, SS City of Everett, would tow barges and its Captain Thomas Fenlon claimed it could have saved RMS Republic from sinking, offers to do so having been refused by the RMS Republic’s captain.

 

0633 . . . the other morning, a quarter hour after sunrise.

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30 seconds later, at a different angle.

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It’s really about light.

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0832  The good light is gone.  Time to move on to something else.   But wait . .  are those the towers of the new Goethals Bridge along the right edge of the photo?

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All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

And if you missed the new NY harbor dock book info yesterday, here it is again.  The author writes, “I decided to adapt his work into book form. I left the Martin Golden byline so he would get credit for his work. I think the old names on the docks are  best feature. Most of those terminals have gone the way of the dodo, but old timers can still be heard giving security calls at Standard Tank, Copper Docks and other places not there anymore.”

Unrelated:  Did anyone catch Kirsten Grace leaving the sixth boro this weekend?  Was she towing Newtown Creek to its new life?  As of this posting, Kirsten Grace is approaching Wilmington NC.

I’m trying to catch up with the photos you all have been good enough to share on tugster.  The first five here come from some salts up on the Caloosahatchee Canal in Florida.  John Parrish was westbound here, but a week later it showed up in the sixth boro, and by publication of this post, it’s already back to Norfolk.   That’s some sea miles.  Here are some of my previous photos of John Parrish.

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Also, westbound in that Canal, it’s Brittany Beyel.  She’s Beyel Brothers equipment, who have a dramatic photo on that link.

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This one’s eastbound on the Canal with a crane.  I can’t quite make out the name, but the the steersman has great visibility.

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Boomalong was getting hauled out.  Her fine lines made me think she has a storied past, and it turns out she does.  She began life in 1944 in Owen Sound, ON as HMCS Neville, HMCS being Her Majesty’s Canadian Ship.   She’s a Russel Brothers boat that has been around, currently quite far from

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Sault Ste. Marie.

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Thanks to Jed, who previously contributed many photos, here’s a photo and text:  “it’s Stephanie S (1986) returning to Port Canaveral after escorting the bulk carrier VENTURE out of the port.”

photo date 11 MARCH 2016

photo date 11 MARCH 2016

From Birk Thomas, it’s Barents Sea, now over in Port Newark, having moved for the first time in at least five years.  She looks rough, but I’m hoping there’s a make-over in the works for her.   If she moves again, I’d love to see some photos.

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Here’s my photo of W. O. Decker, docked at Caddell Dry Dock, being worked on  . . . or waiting for Wavertree to make her promenade back to South Street.

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From Jason LaDue, here’s a good view of the underbelly of Grouper, frequently referred to in this blog.  Such belly will be visible until the pool level of the Erie Canal is brought back up for the start of the season.  Jason’s also a frequent contributor.

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Now here’s an oldie but goodie from the other JED.  It shows Labrador Sea and Taurus, significant because now that Taurus is being phased out, Labrador Sea–which had worked on the Mississippi and Gulf for the past few years, has moved back up here into Taurus‘ place, I’m told.   And they’re in K-Sea colors.

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And I said “and more” in the title?  Here’s the more, a new dock book from Tony Acabono.  If it’s your business to know where berth 60 is in Port Elizabeth in relation to berth 61 in Port Newark, you might want to check it out.

Many thanks to the secrets salts and the not-so-secret ones for sending along these photos.

 

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