You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Thousand Islands’ tag.

Here was “springtime.”  All the following photos taken by Jake Van Reenen this past summer show the variety of cargoes moved.

0aasw2

 

0aasw3

 

0aasw4

 

0aasw5

 

0aasw6

 

0aasw7

 

0aasw8

 

0aasw9

 

0aasw10

 

0aasw12

 

0aasw13

 

0aasw14

 

0aasw22

Many thanks to Jake for use of these photos.

 

If you haven’t read it yet, here’s my Professional Mariner article on “barging” in the area of the St. Lawrence River called the Thousand Islands. Since there’s plenty of reading there, I’ll just make this mostly a photo post.  LCM owner Jake Van Reenen took all but the last three photos in this post.

In February, the LCM and everything else “afloat” is actually ice-trapped.   Folks who live year-round on the islands travel by snow machine.

0aass1

By late March, the ice has turned to liquid, and navigation starts to resume on the Seaway. 

0aass2

It’s April and houses on the islands need a visit from the fuel truck.

0aass3

In May, folks from “away” begin to return, sometimes bringing their own supplies.

0aass4

All manner of vehicles travel to the Islands in early June, when

0aass5

I visited.  The photos below I took  . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

As we traveled with an empty fuel truck back to Clayton, we took the stern of

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Vikingbank, headed upbound for Duluth!! for grain.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Captain Jake and deckhand Patsy Parker.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

Summer and early fall photos from Seaway Marine Group will follow.

If you’re interested in reading a great book on Andrew J. Higgins, the developer of these boats, try this one by Jerry E. Strahan.

For my post on another LCM cleaning up Sandy debris, click here. For my post on repurposed LSTs, one I’ll be traveling on tomorrow, click here.

Back to the jaunt in the St Lawrence watershed, specifically my itinerary was from Clayton mainland to Grindstone Island, then return to the mainland, then southwest to Cape Vincent, and then to Kingston, Ontario.  To get to Kingston from Cape Vincent involves two ferries:  one from Cape Vincent to Wolfe Island in Canada and then after a 20-minute drive across Wolfe, another ferry from Marysville to Kingston.  Here’s a map.

0aaaamap

In an archipelago like the Thousand Islands (actually I read there are over 1800 islands fitting the parameters that an “island” remains above the water all year round AND has at least one tree), boats are ubiquitous and landing craft like these two are invaluable.  Summer populations swell the numbers of residents.  Historically, a lot of the wealthy from centers like NYC came up here and built big.  The island out beyond the two LCM-8s here is Calumet Island, and that tower is the only significant remnant of Calumet Castle, built by Charles Emery, a tobacco entrepreneur from Brooklyn. Click here and here for more info about Emery, just one of the players here during the Gilded Age.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

photo taken from Grindstone Island, looking toward Calumet Island and Clayton

In this watershed, pilotage is provided by a total of five providers.  The pilot boat below is at the Cape Vincent station of the St Lawrence Seaway Pilot Association. Notice how clear the water is.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

M/V William Darrell has operated as ferry between Cape Vincent and Wolfe Island since 1952!  Its dimensions are 60′ x 28,’ and later in this post you’ll understand why I’m telling you that.   Scroll through here and you’ll learn that the H on the stack stands for Horne;  the Horne family has been operating the ferry since the 1820s, . . . almost 200 years.  Click here and scroll to see this ferry with a Winnebago on it a few years ago.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

M/V William Darrell entered service as a 12-car ferry.

The Wolfe Island wind farm has operated since 2009.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Wolfe Island  as seen from the ferry Frontenac II to Kingston

 

Frontenac II, 1962 built, has dimensions of 180′ x 45′.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

as seen from onboard

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

as seen from the Kingston land’s edge

Island Queen and other vessels take passengers through parts of the archipelago.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Of course I found one, although there was no name.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

On leg 1 of my return to Cape Vincent aboard Frontenac II, I saw four vessels like this with . . . lunker? rig.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

When I got back to M/V William Darrell, there was just me,  until this bus pulled up.  But the ferry crew took in stride what would have me worried.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

We crossed, and all went without incident.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The only downside was that the bus drove off first, straight to the immigration both, and I spent a good 20 minutes as the passengers’ documents were checked.  Had the immigration waved me through first, I could have been halfway to Watertown before the bus cleared.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who might not post for a few days because the gallivant work trip downstream goes on.

Here, here,  and here are north country posts from a few years back.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,250 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

September 2018
M T W T F S S
« Aug    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930