You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Thomas J. Brown’ tag.

She arrived in the harbor almost six years ago, just before the annual football event, and that’s why I called her that.  Speculation about a name change then from Left Coast Lifter had been rampant, but so far as I know, she has remained LCL.

Above, that’s the last photo I took of her by the TZ Bridge, with Hook Mountain in the background, and below, that’s where she now waits, likely to be down rigged.

I suppose speculation now will be her next destination.  Meanwhile she’ll be a part of the temporary landscape at Weeks, skyline, or crane forest, and she’ll be photographed, as I’ve done here here with MC-41 Snazzy Kitty,

Lady May, and

Thomas J. 

Check her out before she’s lowered for travel.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Other large cranes I’ve posted include Paul Bunyan, Grasse River, Pelicano 1, and Herman the German.  Then there’s the Chesapeake 1000.

 

Frances heads out to earn some money on a rainy yesterday morning.  I’ve no idea what that red glow behind the Statue is.

Lincoln Sea has worked on both coasts since I’ve been doing this blog, and like Frances, has kept the same name.  Click here to see her in my second ever blog post . . . 2006.

Michael Miller here moves equipment to and from islands in the boro’s archipelago.  I first saw this vessel as Stapleton Service.

Annie G II goes way back on this blog too.  Recently she’s been doing a job over west of the Staten Island Ferry racks, a job she was the perfect size for.   She’s a WGI tug.

Jane A. Bouchard was out along the east side of Staten Island, passing the old US Marine Hospital.  See it here if you scroll way through.

Ellen McAllister was heading out for a call.  I likely first posted a photo of her here.

In that photo earlier, Jane was headed to meet up with Evening Star and her barge.

James E. Brown and Thomas J. Brown tag teamed car float NYNJR 200, the newest and largest car float in the sixth boro.

Ditto, CMT Pike and Helen Laraway meet up on a set of scows.

And to close this out, it’s Austin Reinauer, Boston-bound in the rain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are all the previous installments of this series.

Glenn Raymo caught this photo up the Hudson the other day, as Joker assisted a Weeks crane.  Hays tugs do come up here occasionally, but I’ve never seen them.

Back almost exactly six years ago, the same boat headed upriver as a dead ship.  And eight years ago, working for a different company and painted in a different livery, here she was . . .  2011, eastbound in the KVK.

Justin Zizes was coming down the Hudson recently and caught this spring-evoking photo of Nathan G, her gray livery and aggregate cargo set off by the hint of leaves on the tree-lined far shore.

Thanks to Justin also for this photo of Mister Jim in her homeport in Coeymans.

Jan van der Doe sent these photos along of a group of northern European tugs at work, taken in early April by Jan Oosterboer, not far from Rotterdam.

Mutratug 32 is a Carrousel Rave tug, which means she rotate her point of attachment to better brake the assisted vessel.  To see her in action, click here.

And finally, see the tugs in this photo I took on the East River the other day?  Two of them?

Thomas J. Brown is obvious and always a delight to see.  But then there’s Bosco on the barge.  I believe she was heading for a job on the Hutchinson River.

Thanks to Glenn, Justin, Jan, and Jan for photos here.

 

A confusing pic?

This is more clearly Capt. Brian A. and Eric, the two newest McAllisters in the boro, bringing up the stern of Gerd Maersk.

Much less similar, Ellen and Patrice here work the bow of an outbound tanker.

That top photo may be confusing as the ninth photo here is.  So let me conclude by showing the photos taken seconds before and seconds after it.

For all I know, the smaller Brown tug may have been doing some training.  I snapped that top photo when they were neck-and-neck from my vantage point.  Eventually Thomas J. overtook Joyce.  

The phots in between allow one to see how meticulous the paint scheme is on these boats.  I’d love to see the engine room and other interior spaces.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Thomas J. Brown and Sons Inc. has been a marine towing enterprise in the sixth boro since 1927.  Their boats are busy and always very attractive. More than a decade ago I first used this title.

Thomas J. Brown, the oldest current boat, is a classic.

Joyce D. Brown, the most powerful current boat, is headed past Shooters Island here.  That color . . .  I just love it, especially in winter like this.

The newest boat–James E–arrived from the shipyard just a few years ago and regularly moves the rail cars across the boro.   I wonder if this cross-harbor rail tunnel will ever happen.

A few weeks ago James E. was moving this jackup platform.

Paul Strubeck caught the same job here.

As he did catching Thomas assisting James moving rail cars.

And finally, a real treat from Paul, a photo of Cecilia J. Brown, ex- DPC 42, Skipper (1948), Viatic (1952/54), Dalzellance (1957), Cecilia J. Brown, reefed some years ago, although I know not where.

Thanks to Paul for his photos;  all others by will Van Dorp.

 

I love the morning, and I’ve never gotten a better photo of Tasman Sea.  She’s a product of Main Iron Works, class of 1976.

Kirby Moran heads out on a job.   There’s no angle from which these Washburn & Doughty 6000s look anything but stunning.

Ernest Campbell, from Southern Shipbuilding’s class of 1969, comes by to pick up a barge.

James E. Brown, a recent product of Rodriguez Shipbuilding, leaves the dock and heads to the railroad, rail float that is. Daisy Mae came out of the same yard two years later.

As Robert Burton makes her run with a less than loaded barge, I hope commuters appreciate that this stuff is not traveling by road.

Lucy Reinauer is a powerful local 1973 product;  she came out of Jakobson Shipyard in Oyster Bay.

I’m planning a post on nothing but Brown boats, but I put Thomas J. in here because she’s bathed in that same rich morning light.   She’s a 1962 product of Gladding Hearn and is rated at 1000 hp, same as James E.

Elizabeth McAllister has a dramatic and rich history, which you can read here.  To summarize, in May 1988 as Elizabeth Moran, she was t-boned in the fog in Lower New York Bay.

And finally, two of Brewster Marine‘s workhorses . . .  Helen Parker (2005) and Ava Jude (2013).  In the distance is Neptune, built 1992 and sailing for Dann Ocean since 1996.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous posts in this series.

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Some of you know the dimensions of these two vessels, so for you all who don’t, I’m not saying for now.

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Some of the CMA CGM ships are named for French writers; Nerval is an interesting one because of a story–fake or not–about him and his pet lobster.  You mean it’s odd to have a lobster as a pet?

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The tug--T. J. Brown–dates from 1962 and is 60′ x 18.8′  CMA CGM Nerval is relatively small as container ships go these days:  984′ x 131.’

And Gérard de Nerval and his lobster, here’s the story;  he rescued it from the pot. The sixth boro and all its bulkheads have a billion oyster project,  meow man’s beautifications, and maybe it’s time for a NYNJ Nerval to enhance the harbor and its promenades with lobsterloverlanes.  By the way,  I’ve seen animals walking through Penn Station and local transit hubs, but so far, no lobsters.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

There’s winter sail, spring sail, and autumn sail.  And today I’m just staying inside culling photos.   Since moving by wind has been around for millennia, Pioneer is a relatively modern vessel.

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Pioneer, 1885

This vessel below can be “insanely fast.” I took this photos and ones that follow back on May 11, 2015 in Morris Canal.

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Lending Club 2, 2015

Here’s another sixth boro regular, the largest NYC-based schooner.  See her here in winter maintenance.

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Check out these special sails on Clipper City.

Here LC2‘s just finished the 635 nm run in less than 24 hours.

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From Seth Tane on the Columbia River, it’s HMCS Oriole, US-built in 1921.

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I’d love to see the interior of Lending Club 2, but my guess is . . . spartan.

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Also from back in May . . . it’s Wavertree in the last feet of its transit for a major makeover, Thomas J. Brown sliding her over.

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Here’s another shot of L’Hermione entering the Upper Bay for the first time.

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And what do you make of this?

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Maybe more on that last photo tomorrow.

Except for the photo by Seth Tane, all photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This post shows the second leg of what felt like an epic journey, but first let’s back up about 10 minutes.  See the small blue vessel just off the bow of Wavertree?

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It’s a King’s Point vessel, and leaning out of the house, it’s Capt. Jonathan Kabak, formerly master of Pioneer, Lettie G. Howard, and other vessels.

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So let’s resume . . .  the tow travels west of Caddell and rounds up against the tide, ever so

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gracefully–to my eyes–making its way to the dock.  Thomas J. Brown and later Rae working the port side.

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it took a full quarter hour to spin Wavertree 180 degrees and inch it across the KVK, but then the heaving line flew, followed by the dock line.

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Thomas J. and Rae worked this side in coordination with Pelham–invisible all this time from my perspective–on the starboard side.

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almost all fast

Lots of money will be spent and sweat expended before the NEXT leg of the journey.

The 2001 (or earlier??) photo below comes from Mike Weiss, SSSM waterfront foreman.  It shows a more complete rig.

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Also from Mike’s FB post, the photo below shows Wavertree in her Argentina barge days.  For the saga of Peter Stanford’s efforts to get this hull from Argentina to the sixth boro, read A Dream of Tall Ships starting from p. 221.  Actually, the whole book makes an excellent read.

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All photos except the last two by Will Van Dorp, who is eager to see Wavertree‘s transformation in the year to come.

From gCaptain, here’s a good explanation of National Maritime Day, yesterday.

 

But first, many thanks to Bjoern Kils of New York Media Boat for the enjoyable ride aboard his RHIB Amundsen.   I’ve decided to divide the photos into two posts.  These cover the first 15 minutes (!!) of the trip to the yard.

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arriving for the pick up at Pier 25, westside of Manhattan looking towards Jersey City

Bartholdi was finishing up his copper creation a year AFTER Wavertree began its career as a bulk carrier of jute.

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I was thrilled to see the tugs that did the tow, starting with Thomas J. Brown.  This tug has appeared here many times, but here’s probably my favorite.

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Thomas J. Brown, 1962 built

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On starboard side was Pelham.

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Pelham, 1960 built.

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This post covers only 15 minutes, but it seemed like ages, watching this highly unusual tow traverse the Upper Bay.

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at the 31

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passing Robbins Reef Light and  . . .

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the Verrazano.

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and into the Kills

Now if you were on Rae yesterday, you might be feeling left out at this point, but here’s the beginning of your part.  I first saw Rae more than 10 years ago , when she was still  Miss Bonnie.  Click here and scroll.

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passing the dented 6

In the hard hat here and in the rigging earlier probably with the NYTimes photographer who took this photo, it’s Mike Weiss, South Street’s Waterfront Foreman.

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Waving from the shrouds here it’s Capt. Jonathan Boulware, now executive director of SSSM.

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If there had been a salt pile in the late 19th century, Wavertree could have transported it, as it spent its last years before the 1910 dismasting in the tramp trades . . .  Maybe someone can help with specifics here, but I recall reading that Wavertree called in the sixth boro before 1910.

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Here’s a closeup of Rae now in Fox colors, and click here for one from five years ago.

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Rae, 1952 built

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And we’ll pick up here tomorrow.

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to the lower left, that’s Joyce D. Brown about to overtake

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Many thanks to Bjoern of NY Media boat for the ride and to Mike and Jonathan of SSSM for the advance notice of the transit.

 

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