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I had no idea why Fred Johannsen (47′ loa x 18′ and launched 1971) showed up at the east end of the KVK, westbound.

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But a few hours later, she reappeared  . . . with a dead ship.

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Taurus, identified on the VHF as a dead ship?!  !@#@!!

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Up to Kingston she goes, and at 3 kts fighting the flood, it’s

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going to be a long ride.

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Click here for a post of almost five years ago when Taurus herself moved another dead ship.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Forecast for the morning after the Oscars was for some sun, which I sorely needed.  And who’s out . . . William Oscar aka W. O. Decker, for starters.

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CCNI Aquiles and Dallas Express at Global . . . and a Moose boat racing toward us.

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I couldn’t quite figure out what Sorensen Miller‘s load was.   In the background, that’s the Newark Bay Bridge, which doesn’t make it on my fotos much.

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Virginia Sue was fishing off Clermont.

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John P. Brown moved nine (?) railcars from Brooklyn to Jersey.

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Clipper Legacy arrived here yesterday.

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Shawn Miller‘s pushing trucks around again, this one  all ready for the mid-March holiday.

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Taurus light moves past Christine McAllister.

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And . . . let’s conclude with another shot of William Oscar, wherever it may be heading.

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All fotos this morning before the clouds moved in . . . by Will Van Dorp.

My library for the time period  January 1, 2012 until today contains 11,244 fotos.  Starting from tomorrow, any 2012 fotos will be taken along the road.  So I decided to choose ONE foto per month, quite subjectively and without regard for this foto having previously been featured here.  I don’t claim these are the best of the month. Only 12 fotos, one per month.

January, Sandmaster . . .  waiting to refuel.  Today, Dec 22 . . .  Sandmaster was out there doing what it usually does, mining sand.

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February . . . Eagle Beaumont escorted in the Arthur Kill by Charles D. McAllister.

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March . . . side by side, CSAV Suape and bulker Honesty, Pacific bound through the Miraflores locks, demonstrating graphically what panamax means.

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April . . . red-trimmed Taurus west bound on the KVK, cutting past Advance Victoria.  And just today, I saw Taurus, now blue-trimmed, heading north between Manhattan and Jersey City.

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Choosing just one foto per month is tough, but for May, here’s Swan packed and almost ready to go hulldown toward Africa with these specimens of the Crowley, Reinauer, and Allied fleets.

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June . . . Weeks Shelby tows shuttle Enterprise from JFK toward Manhattan.

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July and an unforgettable 4th using Pegasus as subject under the rocket’s glare

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August . . . and coal-fired Badger heads into the sunset . . . and Wisconsin.

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September, and a parade of vessels including Urger and Buffalo leave the Federal Lock bound for Waterford.   My inimitable platform here is Fred’s Tug44.

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At the start of the Great Chesapeake Schooner race, crew is setting sail on the unique tugantine Norfolk Rebel.  In the distance, it’s Pride of Baltimore 2.

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Coming into the home stretch from Montreal, it’s Atlantic Salvor delivering segments of the WTC1 antenna.

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And December . . .  it’s Stena Primorsk looming over the USCG vessels.   At this time, Stena Primorsk was impatient to load that first hold with “north dakota crude,” only to experience the malfunction that has left her temporarily disabled upriver, its outer hull gashed open.

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Tomorrow I hit the road . . . gallivanting and visiting season.  I thank all of you for reading, many of you for helping me get these fotos, lots of you for correcting my errors and supplying missing info. Happy New Year and let’s pray for much-needed Peace on Earth . . . .

10 was just over exactly a year ago, and my first “fog” post fotos were taken over six years ago here.    This autumn dawn brought fog and horns . . . horns that could be heard, with echoes, and felt.  Eukor Morning Conductor seemed asleep to shore folk

as Anna L. Miller motored by.

On the KVK, Gage Paul Thornton chugged to an appointment as Bow Summer , which I last saw in springtime Panama, made all lines fast.

Mary Alice towed more Kills bottom out to sea.

Finally, the loudest and deepest horn came into view.

attached to Americas Spirit, a name of a befogged yet moving vessel which I’ll avoid attributing too much symbolic meaning to.

Taurus passes Robbins Reef Light.

And Americas Spirit came closer.

She was so close to this shore observer that two of her crew could be clearly seen on the bridge wing.

Barbara McAllister spun her stern to put the tanker portside to at the dock.  More of these docking fotos tomorrow.

And Hunting Creek also made her way from Brooklynside to Bayonneside.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Colleen basks in early morning light before the race earlier this month.

Resolute makes a quick turn to assist with a tow.

Discovery Coast turns westbound into the KVK.

Resolute takes the stern of Thomas J. Brown.

Miriam Moran reports for yet another job.

The inimitable Herbert P. Brake leaves the east end of the Kill.

Laura K. Moran . . .  speed turning.

Taurus heads for the mooring.

Treasure Coast crosses in the foreground after Taurus  gets to the mooring.

Discovery Coast cruises back to home base.

It’s Choptank light about to cross the Upper Bay for Brooklyn, and

a whole bevvy of McAllisters, including Helen. in Mariner’s Harbor . . .  also just before the tugboat race almost three weeks ago.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who does a short gallivant starting later tomorrow.

Here was Rhythms 2.

And the tugboat with the travel trailer on the afterdeck–anyone wish to help C. E. Grundler speculate about why it’s up there?–is Nancy Ann on the Willamette River in Oregon.

Last night my question was “to post . . .  or not to post,” and  . . . I think I made the right choice.   Here . . . at dusk was Gramma Lee T Moran, light east bound in the KVK, and

less than an hour later, westbound with a tanker–like a trophy–alongside.   The tanker is Kimolos, two weeks out of Denmark.

A view of a Bouchard barge notch, and

a different Bouchard barge inside the “notch” of Caddell’s big floating drydock.

Taurus light, and

slinging a barge.

Asian King delivering cars to NYC Bayonne, and

Radiant Sky taking their dismemberments away from Claremont.

Meridian Ace crew getting their last fotos in NYC before geting their next fotos in  . . . who knows . . .

Philly.  By the way, click here and scroll down to see where all they’ve been in the past quarter year . . .

All fotos by Will Van Dorp last night, with thanks to JC for getting me there.

I’ve no idea why some days a single fleet seems to predominate among boats coming and going past my various offices along the KVK.  By the way, “offices” just means anyplace from which good fotos can be had; peaceful places all but low on creature comforts.  Yesterday snow-white and orange was all I saw.   All but the first two fotos, which come compliments of Jed and Allen Baker, respectively,  were snapped in less than an hour and a half yesterday, with no other moving boats in sight.

Below, from left to right:  Ross Sea, Greenland Sea, and Lincoln Sea–all featured here before.  I’ve seen Ross and Greenland in their previous lives as Normandy and Emma M Roehrig, but Lincoln Sea in “robin’s egg” blue predates my tugster life.  For a description of Lincoln’s Sea first appearance, read this 2004 article by the stellar Staten Island foto/scribe, Don Sutherland.  I’m speculating that Greenland Sea was once robin’s egg blue as well, given her former life (pre-Emma M)  as S/R Providence.  Can anyone confirm?

Here’s Taurus profile and

stern view as she worked her way into the notch yesterday.  By the way, tanker in the foto above is Jose Stream.

Here’s Lincoln Sea stern view.

Baltic Sea headed for the fuel dock as

Bering Sea and Houma (left to right) leveraged

a barge into a dock before heading back

west over behind Shooter’s Island

separately.  By the way, Bering Sea must have previously worn maroon paint as Stacy Moran.  In the distance is the waterfront of Elizabeth, NJ.

And while we’re dealing with Seas, Ashley Sea over by Stapleton.  Uh . . . this might be a different fleet.  By the Way, Ashley Sea was built at New Century Shipyards in Zhangjiagang, China (fish farm country up the Yangtze River from Shanghai) in 2007.

Last eight fotos by Will Van Dorp.

More color changes coming soon.

Related:  Do any West Coast readers have fotos of K-Sea’s Tiger?

Related to “Night Light” post of a few days back . . . a 200-foto profile of the Gowanus Canal from this morning’s NYTimes submitted by readers.

Also, check out this restored 1910 tug on a blog called Peregrine Sea.

ok . . . so the word is roll?  Lubbers might say lean?  I already did pitchTaurus swings to port;  coffee builds on the starboard side of the cup.

 

Ditto Meredith.

Oleander swings to starboard;  soup swirls to port.

Amy C McAllister throws herself into docking.

as does Miriam Moran .

Coast Guard RIBs lean into their turns , as opposed to

most other vessels.  Here’s  Amy C again.

For some tilting in the vicinity of windmills, check this video from Rotterdam.

Still fotos by Will Van Dorp.

No . .  I’ve been tied up with spring cleaning . . . really.  But the blog needs to break out.  Here’s Davis Sea pushing up the Rondout past Petersburg and Hackensack.

And all the rest here from Paul Strubeck’s lens/flickr account, and all take between 60 and 110 miles north of the sixth boro.  Cheyenne,

North Sea and Lil Rip,

Taurus,

Margot,

and a government boat, Wire.

And as I post this, here downriver, it FEELS like a thaw, like a hint of spring in January.

Many thanks to Paul Strubeck for these fotos.  Paul works on Cornell.

The google map below has two points marked;  all fotos above were taken between those points.

O . . . oil, petrOleum, fuel, which I’m guessing is the sixth boro’s most valuable cargo; not to say sand, rock, scrap, cement lack value.   Wonder fuel of the past 150 or so years, thanks to what Edwin Drake started.  But what will power home and industry and what cargo will hold greatest value  150 years from now, or a hundred, or fifty, twenty.

Tankers move crude in, and other tankers move petroleum products both in . . . and out.  We export petroleum products –like diesel–due to relative refining capacity, but I’ve no clue where Stena Performance goes when she leaves the Kills for sea.

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Adriatic Sea, southbound on the Hudson near Bear Mountain Bridge, pushes what might be petroleum or might be ethanol.

aaao2Here Taurus pushes a fuel tank.

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As does Curtis Reinauer.
aaaocr Bering Sea has a loaded fuel tank on the hip.

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When a tanker comes into this terminal on the KVK, they hook into hoses like these.

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Here’s the whole set.  Is there a technical term for these, both individual hoses and the entire set?

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Scorship King Douglas, exactly a year old, came in this morning, but it hardly seems loaded to capacity.  Why not?  Tug is Rowan M McAllister.

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When Eagle Atlanta came in, she seemed deeper in the water than King Douglas, but maybe  both were to capacity.  Tug is Marjorie B McAllister.

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What was uncomfortable about writing this post is all the unknowns, and I know I don’t know a lot related to oil.  Yet, my daily life could not happen without oil.  Very few people on the face of the Earth can say they are totally free of a reliance on oil.  It’s an amazing admission, given that it’s a finite resource.  Yet, I think I can safely say that most of us don’t know much about the source, international supply and refining chain, and transportation of items in their lives stemming from petroleum.  Like the gas I put in my car today, I’ve no clue where it lay in the Earth for hundreds of hundreds of thousands of years before–relatively recently–it started the journey toward the gas tank of my car.  And the oil that refining transformed into plastics and chemicals in my house, which pocket beneath the surface did that come from?  If I burned wood to run a steam engine, I might at least know which tree I cut to get this nice hot fire, but oil . . . not a hint.   And it all bothers me because I’d like to know.

Metaphorically, oil as fuel and lubricant . . . it’s potent stuff, without which, nothing good happens.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated to this post, but go back to “Meditations M” . . . on masts.  Les Sonnenmark labeled almost all the units on Yankee‘s mast.  Can anyone help with the topmost one?

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