You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Tangier Island’ tag.

Let me start here . . . the boat below can be yours.  Click on the photo for full information.  It’s currently in the Seattle area, and I’m posting this for a friend.

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Turecamo Girls –this one was launched in 1965 and is rated at 1950 hp.  Here was a previous version, which may or may not still be working in South America.

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Gulf Venture–She’s a new vessel in this harbor.  Launched in 2016 and “married” to Gulf Carrier, call her powerful at 5150 hp.

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Any guesses?

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Tangier Island, the tug, 2014 and 3000 h.

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Mister Jim, 1982 and 1800 hp.

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This Stephanie Dann, 1978 and 3200.

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Evening Mist, 1976 and 3000.

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Here she’s framed by the bow of Yantian Express.

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Finally, James Turecamo, 1969 and 2000.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recalls a wonderful tour of parts of the Salish Sea aboard Coot (for sale above) almost seven years ago here.

Today’s spotlight’s is Emerald Coast, Long Island, Tangier Island, Sassafras, and Brooklyn . . .

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Hats off–No

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keep hats and gloves on– but bravo to the folks who safely move

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our fuel.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I considered calling this “random vessels,” since I haven’t used that title in a while, but here is a tighter focus for a few days:  tugboats.  Here I also randomize the backgrounds and seek out some vessels infrequently seen.  Like the rare and exotic  Shelby Rose and

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Jay Michael and Vicki M and

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Patricia with her racing stripes up against the gantry arms.

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Wye River and James E. Brown here cross the south end of Newark Bay, where

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Sandmaster has been tied up for (?) nearly a year now.

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Sassafras did a circle in Erie Basin recently, and

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Thomas, the Weeks tug, strode into town, picked up a barge and headed straight for Texas!  The first time I saw Thomas was January 2009.  Remember what memorable event splashed into the Hudson around the middle of that month?

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Buchanan 12 here is light and seen from almost her prop wash.  I hadn’t noticed the Boston registry before.

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Quantico Creek stays local a lot, but Severn I don’t see much.

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Here’s Tangier Island behind . .  yes, Gerardi’s Farmers Market. 

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OK . . . that’s it for today.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.  More random tugs tomorrow.

 

Here and here are previous posts in this spirit, but first, the answer to yesterday’s bridge identification question . . . Joseph Chomicz nailed it . . . it’s Outerbridge Crossing, named for a person of commerce.

Today’s question is:  as you look through the photos in this post, can you think of a type of cargo that seems to be missing in the sixth boro in recent months?

In the photo of the self-unloader below, Outerbridge Crossing is seen from the south side, not from directly below.

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Although the light is not ideal in the photo below, this is the stern of the self-unloader Caroline Oldendorff, poised to auger salt off to a pile between the oil tanks.

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I like the effect of the flag in front of the spare wheel.  I last saw Caroline on the Mississippi here.

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Here’s an unusual tugster perspective . . . Eagle Madrid leaving the south end of the AK, passing Perth Amboy and

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snaking through the channel across Raritan Bay;  that’s Brooklyn in the background to the right.

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Here’s another unusual tugster perspective . . . Sea Halcyone (formerly Unique Sunshine) passing Shooters Island as seen from Faber Park.

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Note Margaret Moran assisting to port, and a (mothballed??) Liberty IV still on the hard to the left, and several raucous gull drones doing some pilotage.  Maybe?

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Here JPO Pisces gets overtaken by Tangier Island before

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passing MSC Katya R, who’s

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seen in by JRT Moran.

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Heina, although no self-unloader, is discharging the same cargo as Caroline Oldendorff had in her holds:  salt.

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So which cargo seems to be missing . . . in recent months?  My perception is orange juice, my favorite drink.  Have I just been missing the ships, or is there a change in the supply chain?

Again, congrats to Joseph for naming the bridge in yesterday’s post.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

How many islands do you see in this photo?

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Well, the upper wheelhouse of Long Island is all you could see of the tugboat in the photo above.  Below you see the port side of the tugboat, possibly the newest Vane Brothers’ name in the sixth boro.

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Below is Tangier Island.  Now you’d almost think there’s a new class emerging with these two boats, except Tangier Island is rated at 3000 hp and

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and Long Island, at 4200.  Now if you look closely at the name of the bow of the tug, you’ll see some raised letters  . . . TLY and

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here you’ll notice the PE . . . .

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So no need to imagine this as a new class . . . an Island class . . . it’s the old Peter F. Gellatly, whose evolution continues.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I don’t actually go looking for parallel posts;  maybe it’s just that my brain thinks and eyes see in similar ways from one year to the next in March, but here and here are posts from exactly four years ago.

Although this blog focuses on work boats, I’ll comment on backgrounds today.  What’s on the water is fluid, but all the constant transformations on the landsides here are more permanent and yet constantly evolving.  Baseline might have been 500 years ago, but even by then it had evolved.  The cruise ship here is docked at what today is called Cape Liberty Cruise Port;  thirty years ago it was MOTBY.

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Frances waits at a barge anchorage near Anthem of the Seas

Over on the nearest shore, left half of the photo is evidence of work where next year an attraction called New York Wheel will spin.  I know we’re way past name discussions now, but I’m still for alternatives like Ferries Wheel or NY Wheeler Dealer . . . .  And with the reference to “pods,” I’m thinking of a series of sci-fi movies . . .

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Eastern Welder fishes as New Jersey Responder exits the KVK.

The uneven, brown land just off the starboard bow of USNS Red Cloud is part of the Bayonne Golf Club, below the surface of which is a capped landfill.

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Discovery Coast passes in front of Red Cloud.

Off to the left, you see current status of the Bayonne side of the bridge named for the same town.

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From l. to r., there’s Chandra B, Celsius Manila, New Jersey Responder, and (I think) Robert E. McAllister.

Looking from behind the construction site for the Wheel, some miles to NE are part of the Statue of Liberty and  the iconic 1931 Empire State Building.

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Anacostia (2009)  and Tangier Island (2014)  look a lot alike, but the older boat has 1200 more horsepower.

Note the double deck traffic on the VZ Bridge.

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l. to r. it’s Caroline Oldendorff and Australian Spirit.

This is looking from the middle of Upper Bay across Red Hook to downtown Brooklyn.

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In front of the busy background, it’s Alice Oldendorff, Rossini, and Robert E. McAllister.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous posts in this series, and I’m finding that in the four years since the last installment, things have changed . . . and not.  Most of these boats haven’t appeared in the previous four.    The livery and logo remain the same, but there are some new boats.  Can you figure out how two of the following photos differ from then others?

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Chesapeake, launched 2006

Once while listening on VHF, I thought there was a new boat in town called “honey creek.”

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Hunting Creek, 2011

 

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Quantico Creek, 2010

 

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Wicomico, 2005

 

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Red Hook, 2013

 

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Tangier Island, 2014

 

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Fells Point, 2014

 

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Susquehanna, 2006 with Savannah

 

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Christian . . .  1981

 

So, obviously, Christian, being a crew boat, differs from all the others.   Another difference, though, is that Chesapeake and Susquehanna were not photographed in the sixth boro.  Identifying one location might be easier than the other.  Guesses?

By the way, I know I’ve seen Kings Point, but I seem not to have a photo.

Answer soon.

These photos come thanks to Allen Baker, whose most recent photos you saw here.

I’ll just use his description:  “Heading east in the Long Island Sound on 27 December, just an incredible sky looking aft as we made our way east….

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Tangier Island heading across the upper bay with the lower Manhattan skyline as a back drop,

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Bering Sea overtaking …  out of the old Port Mobil, Staten Island,

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Crowley ATB Coastal Reliance, assisted by the Chas. D. and Bruce McAllister, inbound on the Con Hook Range, and

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close up of the Coastal Reliance.”

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I can be really happy to escape the winter temperatures, but nothing beats winter light!

Many thanks to Allen Baker for all these photos.

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