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Gott passed just south of Detroit, so let’s pick up the journey there.

On their way to Tall Ships Erie, Niagara above and Denis Sullivan below down bound under bare poles.

At a steel plant, Herbert C. Jackson offloads coal.

CSL Baie Comeau heads down bound.

Bushey tug transplanted to fresh waters, it’s Cheyenne reinventing herself.

Passing us near midtown, it’s the many-times reinvented  Lee A. Tregurtha,

sailing into a storm.

We’d not even gotten into Lake St Clair when the storm caught up with us . . . and this dinner boat heading south.

All photos by Will Van dorp.

What can you do with a 1953-built T-boat?

Just about anything.  Since 1970, Neeskay has been UW-Milwaukee’s primary research vessel.  I hope to post more about her later.

Joseph started brewing his fizzy water 169 years ago in Milwaukee.

The Milwaukee River has numerous drawbridges.

Frederick was brewing his five years earlier even than Joseph.

Krista S used to work in the sixth boro as one of many “sea wolf” incarnations.

Don’t walk away from your camera post, or you might get only the stern portion of a tug and barge. I managed an only-slightly better photo here some time back.

Schooner Denis Sullivan revives a design that was the best way to get cargo around Lake Michigan and the other Lakes before rail and road systems were created.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who learned from Lee Murdock that Denis Sullivan was captain of the schooner Moonlight.

 

I don’t usually think of the Great Lakes as schooner territory, but that’s a misperception:  before rail and roads, these moved cargo around the northern midwest.

SV Denis Sullivan has been down bound as far as Quebec City this summer for the tall ships’ render-vous.    Has Sullivan ever seen saltier water beyond Quebec City?

Just as she approached, she started dropping sail, starting with the headsails

and moving astern. Here a crew flakes the foresail as it is lowered.

A little math with an assumption that Sullivan–a replica, I know– could carry 400 tons of ore sound like a way to get in trouble:

anyhow, if my assumption were correct, it would take 170 schooners to carry the same amount of ore as Paul R. Tregurtha, right?

Here, using signage from the Chicago Maritime Museum, is a little context.

“lumbershovers”??  A a ferry might hire peopleshovers?

Photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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