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I had something different planned for today, but one does not plan the news.  Since I’m map-oriented, I’m sharing what I found on the “maps” of the Ever Given story, the 20,000 teu+ container ship acting as a cork in a bottleneck.

Below is the context for the story.  If you’re not that familiar with the bigger context, grab a map showing the SE corner of the Mediterranean Sea.  On the map below, notice Alexandria, Cairo, and Tel Aviv.  Aqaba is lower right.  Color code is as follows:  red = tankers, green = freighters, aqua = tugboats.  Also note the absence of traffic for a portion of the canal (that line) going southward from Port Said. Normally there’d be red, green, or aqua icons there.

Here’s a closeup of the location where Ever Given has wedged itself across the canal.

Click on the image below to get a recent Reuters story.  Here from space.com is another story with great images.

Note the aqua-colored  tugboats, out of scale, attempting to extricate the cargo vessel.

With a cork in the bottle, so to speak, ain’t nuttin goin’ nowhere, as I might say in a different setting.

The image below shows more context than the image above.  Suppose your rush order too big for air cargo happened to be on one of those ships.  Actually, there’s cargo halted there for hundreds of millions of folks.

The image below shows bottled up southbound traffic (mostly) unable to proceed beyond Ever Given south of Qaryat al Jana’in.

The image below shows the backup so far in the Mediterranean, again mostly southbound traffic, mostly Asia bound.

It ain’t over yet, and it takes a lot more fuel to get between Europe and Asia by sailing around Capetown.

Personal note:  I sailed from Jeddah to Port Suez 35 years ago and saw lots of traffic on the Red Sea in both directions.

Credit to marine traffic.com for allowing these views.

Sometimes posts just write themselves, like this one.  After seeing someone else post a photo of a large tugboat named Abundance and a barge named Stymie, I had to follow suit.  I tried unsuccessfully to find what or where Densa is.

Arctic Breeze as a spring morning dawns?

Ah . . . the good lord DOES have a village named for him upstate along the Erie Canal . . . , a village that’s also associated with other noteworthy folks.

Here I have a serious question . . .  is there a seacoast town anywhere where high school girls vie for this title as they do for such titles as Miss Apple Blossom?  Click here for some other crazy contests . . .

Oops . . I shot the photo too early.  Here’s a closer up view of what Michael Miller is pushing.

And if there’s a Suez Canal in the Kill Van Kull, might there be a Kill Van Kull in the Suez Canal?

And finally . . . do you remember Roaring Bull?  Well, they are a struggling ferry operation over Susquehanna, great people with a long history.  Maybe you can contribute some of your tax refund now and take a ride on the ferry later this summer.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Personal disclosure: Twenty-plus years ago I had the opportunity to take a ship on the Red Sea from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia to Port Suez, about 700 miles. All the daylight hours of this summer 60-hour voyage were a fantastic platform to watch other traffic and look down from the railing beside the bridge. From 50-feet up, I recall seeing the flying fish frightened by our bow wave and swarming sharks at various depths in the clear water. I would not have lasted long had I gone in. It was a simpler time, and the Egyptian passengers (99% of the passengers; there was one Sudanese family, and one American [me], which I know because customs cleared me last.) were most hospitable. Oh, for a return to these friendlier times.

redsea3.jpg

In the green shirt, that’s a very young tugster. As we headed into Port Suez, the southern end of the Canal, we steamed past a cluster of ships waiting for traffic to be northbound. Then, traffic flowed six hours south, followed by six hours north, and so on.

 

redsea2.jpg

Here is a southbound tanker, in ballast. Unlike the Panama or Erie, the Suez has no locks, so draft is the limiting factor. Suezmax designates maximum draft that can safely traverse; any vessels of greater draft would be Capesize.

Hmm… my pre-digital photos are quite grainy. I wonder where the closest port to accommodate Capesize vessels is.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, back in 1985.

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