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Enterprise seems a great title for a post on National Maritime Day, but here’s a question answered at the end of this post:  Why–other than the 1933 proclamation by Congress–is May 22 chosen for this day?  Answer at the end of this post.

Jake van Reenen took these photos yesterday in Clayton, NY.  The title evokes my Salvor post from eight plus years ago.

Atlantic Enterprise and crane barge are headed to the sixth boro, still many sea miles ahead.

Jarrett M assists with the tow, a role it played about a month upstream through the same waters here.

 

 

I’m eager to see this Salvor twin back in the sixth boro.

This post from nearly 10 years ago features my first view of this vessel–then called Barents Sea–under way.

Many thanks to Jake for these photos.  If all goes as planned, Enterprise will arrive here in less than two weeks.  Eyes peeled?

So, May 22 . . . it’s National Maritime Day because of Savannah, that’s SS Savannah, she who began the first Atlantic crossing on this date under steam power 199 years ago . . . well, at least steam powered her wheels for a little over 10% of the trip, but you need to start somewhere, eh?  And this fact is alluded to in the 1933 proclamation, as well as in the 2017 proclamation.

 

Click on the photo to get the source of the photo and the story of her short life.  And the 199 years ago, that just begs for some sort of memorializing in 2018…

Did Hurricane Sandy unearth SS Savannah wreckage?  Read here.

 

If you ever visit anywhere near Savannah, an absolute must-see is the Ships of the Sea Museum in the former William Scarbrough House, later the West Broad Street School. Given that the house and collection are stunning and the staff extraordinarily welcoming, it didn’t surprise me how crowded the museum was.

Excuse the quality of my photos taken sans tripod, but let’s start with this model of a vessel that has a connection with New York City.  Answer follows, but clues for now are that the vessel was built as the Denton in 1864 and you might know the whitish horizontal object to the left of the display case .  . .  in front of the bow of the model.

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The SSM models are quite large, and many of them are the handiwork of William E. Hitchcock.

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SS Savannah, e.g., is a great place to begin your tour and appreciate Hitchcock’s handiwork.  This vessel–the first steamship to cross the Atlantic--was built on the land’s edge the sixth boro.

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Notice the port side of Hitchcock’s model shows the paddlewheel, but

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the starboard side features a cutaway to the boiers and the paddlewheel collapsed as it would be while the vessel sailed, which was most of the time.

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Another of Hitchcock’s models shows a 220′ schooner as she appeared under construction.

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Notice that Forest City‘s demise–as was SS Savannah’s–happened on Fire Island.

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The SSM collection also includes a Hitchcock model of USS Passaic, another product of the sixth boro–Greenpoint–although many sources, including this one from wikipedia, state its shipyard as being Greenport, 120+ miles away.  Greenpoint’s Continental Iron Works also built Monitor, launched the same year as Passaic.

Back to the model at the top.  The vessel Denton had been renamed SS Dessoug when it delivered Cleopatra’s Needle to NYC.

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This and much more awaits you at Ships of the Sea Museum.  Thanks to Jed for suggesting–half a decade ago–that I go there.

These photos–warts and all-by Will Van Dorp.

 

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