You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘sixth boro’ tag.

Here are the previous posts in this series.  This is the SUNY training ship’s return this past week from a “sea term” that began this way on May 10. This first set of photos comes from Roger Munoz, who took them from high above 74th Street.

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That’s Roosevelt Island just to her far side, and the Queens and the Bronx farther beyond.

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Later that morning, Thomas Steinruck took these during the assist back into the dock

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as

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friends and family welcomed TS Empire State VI home.   Now it’s back to classes, study, and tests in this part of the Bronx.

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Many thanks to Roger and Thomas for use of these photos.

Fly the Whale, that is.  And you can watch it all from the Barge Bar on the East River.

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Click here for a short video showing how to beat traffic . . .

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Of course, seaplanes or flying boats are nothing new to the sixth boro.  Click here for a short video of a Dornier Do-X arriving in a tugboat-filled harbor in 1929.  It has no sound, but if you want to hear the details, here’s another longer video.   Keyport NJ’s Aeromarine was operating long distance flights from the sixth boro even earlier.

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Watch them come and go

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as

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you

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watch from

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here.  For seaplane prices, click here.  But it costs nothing to watch, which is the right price for me.

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Click here for a previous post on Keyport.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp, who thinks that the photos in this post from February 2015 is an invigorating reminder of winter on a hot day.

Also, yesterday Marie Lorenz competed her journey in a rowboat from Buffalo to the sixth boro, and in true DeWitt Clinton fashion, she celebrated her accomplishment by pouring out some Lake Erie water into New York harbor.  See it and much more here.

I’ve written about summertime and about summertime blues–about beating them.  But since you can’t ever step into the same river twice, or gallivant in the same primordial first boro, here’s the 2016 version of trying to capture the sixth boro with a camera on a hot summer weekend afternoon, looking for shade–any shade will do– as much as looking for novel compositions.

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These days odd juxtapositions can be found on west Manhattan piers and

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beyond, like Eagle and the fast bird and Loveland Island with a pilot on board and some folks gathered on the starboard bridge wing .  For a post I did last year with close-ups of details of USCGC Eagle AND for a book I highly recommend reading about her appropriate by the US post-WW2, click here.  Speaking of piers, here’s an interesting article on the engineering and construction of Pier 57.

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Or come for a tour on Janet D Cruises . . .

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with four sails set.

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Long Beach comes to Bayonne along with a Celebrity ship and a PWC . . . pesky workless canoe?

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Flagship Ivy clings for a spell to the bottom over by the VZ Bridge.

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Margaret Moran heads for the next job–or the yard, with Queens’ current and future tallest buildings in the background,

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while YP 704 sails past Governors Island, which has sprouted some new hillocks frequented by lots of people.

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Joan Turecamo exits the Buttermilk west with a light (?) dry bulk barge Montville, which probably recently carried coal.

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All photos Sunday by Will Van Dorp.  for some contrast, see this winter set and this.   More of the summer selects, tomorrow.

 

Below is a photo of State of Maine taken off Antwerp, Belgium,  on 12 July 2016 and used with permission.

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Another recent visit to the sixth boro by an ocean academy training ship happened on July 19.

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The photo above and below were taken by Lew.  Golden Bear is currently steaming SW 100 nm off SW Puerto Rico, headed home.

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These photos prompted me to look up the location of Empire State, which should be headed home for the fall semester as well.  It was west of the Azores and headed west as of this writing.  Kings Pointer is home, but I think I caught a smudge of it on the Sound a little over a week ago.  Currently State of Michigan is headed south into the Soo, and earlier this month (5July), I saw her headed south past Wyandot MI toward Lake Erie . . .

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so they’ve been around.   General Rudder— formerly known as Kings Pointer and other names–is headed SE in the Gulf of Mexico.  I’ve not seen her in Texas A & M livery.  And finally, TS Kennedy is in homeport, Buzzards Bay.

For the top photo, thanks to Ron Van Maanen via Aleksandr Mariy.  Golden Bear photos come from Lew.    And only the last one is mine.

 

Type the word training into the search window to the left on this page and you’ll get a variety of posts, as here.  And truth be told, many other options exist for summer training and sea time for ocean academy students;  I met cadets from at least three on my “go west” trip.  Yesterday David Silver got me advance notice of when this training ship would leave port;  thanks to him, I got these photos.

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Kimberly Turecamo assisted, as did Julia Miller and Amy C McAllister.

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By 1230 Friday, she was west of the Brooklyn Bridge and headed for sea,

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for Maine, and by

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this posting, she’s already east of Cape Cod.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Click here to watch David Silver’s 20-minute video of her departure from pier side.

 

Time to recapitulate the “go west” journey and post the many photos of tugboats I’ve omitted . . . .

Passing Senesco, we saw Buckley McAllister approaching us;  I photographed the boat as someone there photographed us.  I’m not sure which Reinauer tug that is in the background.

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In the East river the next morning, we passed Cornell at the Brooklyn Barge, a food and drink venue I need to make time to visit.

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Over by the Circle Line pier, it’s–well–Miss Circle Line, a reinvention of a Matton tug launched in 1955 and previously called Betsy.  Thanks to Paul Strubeck for reading the name board lettering here before it’s applied . . .  That was a joke, but thanks, Paul.

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James William moves stone Mississippi River style down the sixth boro into the gargantuan building site encompassing the other five boros.

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Near 79th Street, this unidentified tug was supporting a pier project.

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Along the Palisades north of the GW Bridge, Comet pushed Eva Leigh Cutler.

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And Miss Yvette moved a scow not far from where

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Carolina Coast waited for her sugar barge to be emptied into the maw of the Domino plant in Yonkers.

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All photos by will Van Dorp, who hopes to see you at the screening of Graves of Arthur Kill at the the Staten Island ferry terminal on August 13.

Summertime and the living is easy . . . and Sassafras is bringing fuel to MSC Marianna.

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JRT Moran is preparing to assist MSC Busan out of its berth

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Another section of Rockefeller University’s River Campus is shipping in aboard Witte 1401 moved by Emily Ann, 

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passing Zachery and Jason Reinauer and

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and Dean.

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Crystal Cutler moves Patricia E. Poling westbound . . .

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Brendan Turecamo assists MSC Busan back out

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on its way

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to Norfolk.

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All photos taken yesterday by Will Van Dorp, who is leaving the area for a while.  Details tomorrow.

 

Is it Jonathan C Moran, which arrived in the sixth boro at some point in the past month?

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It was.

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Actually, as of now, it IS Jack T Moran, which arrived via the East River

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yesterday afternoon, and will be christened along with Jonathan C, in a double ceremony at noon today.

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More soon.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I should use this title more often, given the frequent renewal of robust industry in the sixth boro of NYC, but here is the previous usage.

This series handles my miscellaneous needs with updates, follow-ups, and oddments.

Let’s start with the mage below.  Click on it and you’ll learn how soon a sixth boro GUP vessel transforms into dive attraction named Lady Luck.  Thanks to Mike Hatami for passing along this info.

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If the image below looks like a boat, it is, or it was before San Francisco grew (or tumbled?)  over top of it.  For more info on the buried vessels of SF, click on the image.  Here’s more.

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Below, well that was me about 10 years ago.  After I had built a skin-on-frame kayak, I need to paint the porous “skin” with urethane, hence the respirator.  If anyone’s interested in buying me a token of appreciation to update this vessel–which I still have–click on the image to see my one-item wish list.  And thanks in advance.

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More old business . . . the photo below I took from the Manhattan side of the East River about 10 years ago, and

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this photo was taken by Robert Silva back in September 2014; of course this was what remained of the John B. Caddell after Hurricane Sandy, the suspense,  and the subsequent auction.

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By now, that old steel may have seen the hold of a scrapper like Atlantic Pearl . . . and been transformed in the heat

And finally, in response to a recent comment asking about Gateway tugs . . . the rest of the photos/text here I took/wrote in April 2014 and never posted because I was waiting for some additional info.

“What’s under the ‘white house’ here?

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Click here to find out.   And the tug C. Angelo is resplendent in the brightening daylight.

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So this is future defense works passing obsolete defense works.”

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C. Angelo in drydock?

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All photos except the top three and the one by Robert Silva . . .  by Will Van Dorp.

The first six photo here comes from Jonathan Steinman, taken on June 13.  The Donjon tugs has delivered Chesapeake 1000 to a point just off Rockefeller University’s campus to prepare for lifting prefabricated modules for Rockefeller’s River Campus.

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Step one for Donjon is to secure the gargantuan crane.

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Then Atlantic Salvor moves into place to

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receive the massive anchors, a job that Salvor may be IS uniquely qualified to perform.

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The yellow lighted buoys mark the anchors’ positions.

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By the time I got there on June 17, sans camera other than phone, several of the modules had already been lifted from the waterborne transport into the locations where they’ll stay for a very long time.  See time lapse of the installation of modules 1 and 2 on youtube here.

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A dozen more modules will still be lifted when

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water, tidal, and atmospheric conditions allow.

Click here for more information of the River Campus project, one of many construction sights to behold along the East over.  A calendar of additional lifting can be found here, subject to change.

And many thanks to Jonathan for use of his photos and information about the project.  Next time, I’ll bring my good camera.

Previous sights to behold there can be found here.

And while we’re on the topic of heavy equipment, here’s a vimeo update of of invisible gold project happening off Block Island.  I want to get back there soon.

 

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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