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Tugster feels so very blessed this year that I’m recognizing the top gift boat in the sixth boro.  If NYC ever decided to have a water-borne symbol of gift-giving season, the most appropriate boat for the elf to ride would HAVE to be this one.  See all the packages, wrapped sensibly, on the deck?  While you try to name that boat, let me digress a little to use the print to push the next image farther down the page.

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Digression #1:  Here are my Christmas posts from 2015    2014    one about a Rockefeller Center tree that arrived by ferry    one that arrived here by barge towed by a tug called Spuyten Duyvil and finally my post from 2013.

Digression #2:  If you’re not from NYC or a large city, you might wonder where city folks go to cut their trees.  Here’s a feature from the NYTimes about a Christmas tree vendor who’s come to the same neighborhood NYC with trees for the past 19 years.

Digression #3:  Nope, I don’t get my tree from this vendor.  In fact, I haven’t had a tree for  . . . decades.   Not interested.  So here was the post I put up in 2006, about my first ever Christmas present.  Here’s the story about our first Christmas tree.  My father, who drove a school bus in addition to running a dairy farm, brought home our first tree back when I was 5 or 6.  I think it was his and my mother’s first also, because “christmas trees” did not exist for them in pre-WW2 Netherlands.  Where did he get the tree and what prompted him to bring it home, you might wonder . . .  Well, as he was leaving the school with his last bus run before the Christmas break, he noticed the custodian throwing a tree into the snowbank next to the dumpster.  It must have been set up somewhere in the school–the office?  We LOVED that tree, and it still had some tinsel on it.  My parents were willing to spring for a string of lights, which could be used again year after year, but tinsel?  In my imagination, that tree was the best.

When my kids were small, I did get a Christmas tree, and we decorated it with more than a string of lights.

So have you figured out this vessel that does nothing all year round except deliver packages like these?

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Of course, it’s Twin Tube, featured many times on this blog.

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She is the sixth boros quintessential package boat that delivers no

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matter the weather.

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Merry Christmas to the operators of Twin Tube.

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And merry merry Christmas spirit to all of you who read this blog today and any day.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s received so many gifts every day and doesn’t need anything more on December 25.

 

And then it was a sunny but cold day, the coldest so far in the sixth boro.  ut the light was great.

B.Franklin Reinauer headed for the fuel stop,

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followed by a group that included

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Zachery Reinauer,

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Arabian Sea,

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and Doubleskin 40 pushed by a mostly self-effacing Fort McHenry.  

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Later Tarpon raced past, as

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did Mister T and

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Chesapeake moved her barge eastward.

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Out in Gravesend Bay, Ruth M. Reinauer and Linda Lee Bouchard swung on the hook.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Photography means “light writing,” or writing with light.  George Eastman said, “Embrace light. Admire it. Love it. But above all, know light. Know it for all you are worth, and you will know the key to photography.”

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Obviously I’m interested in the subject matter, but playing with light makes the subject matter more fun.

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“What makes photography a strange invention is that its primary raw materials are light and time.” John Berger

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To comment on the ships, anyone know what product is being discharged from Tatjana?  I believe that’s Frances alongside.

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What makes getting up early so easy is this:  the glow.  Of course, I need to get out there to get the shot.  As Henri Cartier-Bresson said, “It’s an illusion that photos are made with the camera….they are made with the eye, heart and head.”

Merci, Henri.

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That’s NS Stella above and High Strength and Harbour First below.

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The photo of Silver Sawsan below was taken about half an hour after the previous ones, and the light by then is less rich, no matter how bright the orange is.  Ernst Haas says, ““You don’t take pictures, the good ones happen to you.”  And they USUALLY happen during that first hour after dawn and the last one before dusk.  

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I used to fish a lot, and I thought the same thing about fishing.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

It was a warm but cloudy day . . .

Frances came by, as

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did Barry Silverton on a delivery to the Bay State,

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Ellen McAllister to meet a ship,

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and Elizabeth Anne.

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After a lull, there was a burst of traffic again:  Sea Fox,

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Sea Wolf in a hurry,

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and JRT Moran.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Happy winter!

The photo below is from July 2015, and it’s how and where I expect to see James E. Brown.

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So you can imagine how surprised I was to see James E. yesterday where I did, so join me in the experience.  I had to squint to understand this, squint and wait.  At first I thought it was a carfloating job that took a wrong turn.  Then I wondered why the railcars were so small.  Still later, I realized

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that what my eyes identified as boxcars were

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actually large I-beams.

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But when the tow got to the south end of Newark Bay,

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they went north into the Hackensack.  I’m not sure what work is happening up there.

That’s a handsome boat, that James E. Brown.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

or “marifly.”  These two tankers have called here for some years now, but I always wondered whether they were one and the same, given that their names refer to the same critter.  Maybe other vessels in the fleet have names like Paruparo and Borboleta.  Anchored over in Bay Ridge was Mariposa, while doing short-time in Bayonne

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was Butterfly.

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After finishing up business in Bayonne, Butterfly flitted off

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with Robert E. McAllister lined up port side

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while Charles D. McAllister took care of her port.

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Think they have caterpillars on board?

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’ve seen other Grimaldi Grande vessels, but never Grande Senegal.

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So not matter that it was a gray day, I was happy to see this vessel calling in NYC’s sixth bork for the first time.

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Grimaldi is the parent company to ACL, whose unique new vessels have appeared on this blog here.   Click here to see Grande Senegal at her original shipyard back in 2010.

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Unrelated here, but I wonder if vessels passing under this bridge will appear smaller once the soon-to-be-obsolete lower roadbed is removed.

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I’d love to see what tugboats assist the Grande— ROROs at port calls along the West African coast.  Anyone out there can help?

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Ellen McAllister and

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Resolute and all the other escort boats and crews keep shipping in the groove around Bergen Point.

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All photos yesterday by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here’s the previous in the series . . .

but for December 2016, Robert IV leads the way with season’s wreathings, at least the first I’ve seen.  All these photos were take on a windy day a week ago.

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Quantico Creek crosses westward toward the Kills  . . .

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while at about that same moment, Marie J Turecamo heads in the opposite direction, passing

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the Lafarge barge Alexandra (It’s likely Doris Moran standing by off her stern)  and JRT Moran escorting in Auriga Leader.

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Bering Sea also heads eastbound,

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as does Joyce D. Brown . . .

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while the longtime HMS tugs Liberty and

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St Andrews.  With them virtually side-by-side, I can see some livery nuances distinguishing them.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’ve done other East River series, but it’s time to start a new one.  The next 12 photos were taken yesterday over a total elapsed 11 minutes!  I happened to be near South Street Seaport in hopes of catching santacon craziness there, as I did many years ago here.

Let’s start with Alice discharging aggregates, and barely recognizable, that’s Matilde the cement making vessel.

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A longer shot reveals a clutch of kayakers, which I hadn’t seen while shooting.

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Down by Red Hook, I see Frances approach with two barges of aggregate.

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Dean Reinauer passes, pushing a deeply laden

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RTC 106.

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Those are the stacked lanes of the BQE with the Brooklyn Heights esplanade atop.

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Buchanan 1 heads in the same direction as the other two units, but at a slightly greater speed than

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Frances.

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Again . . . all in 11 minutes.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Before returning to bends around points on other rivers, I want to share some photos I took yesterday, first in a while at Bergen Point.  Here’s the set-up out of Newark Bay.

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I’d love to know the tension of the line up from Marjorie.

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Ellen pushes on the port stern quarter, and

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Robert counters on the opposite bow.

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It’s gusty.

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But someone calling the shots up there knows how

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to rotate

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just right.  A year from now, it’s possible there will be gaps in that lower roadbed, if any of it left at all.

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I’ve no idea what the clearance was yesterday, and I’m eager for that walkway to be re-opened.

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Another job is almost complete here as of late morning Friday, but the work never ceases, as traffic into the port can be said to

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be ever lining up.  There are 30 (I believe) of these Ever L ships, liberal, lasting, lovely, loading, lifting, lucid, laden, lucky, loyal, linking, and more.

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Lambent left Shanghai in early November  and will be back in Panama Asia-bound late next week.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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