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I think today is a holiday.  Somewhere.  If it weren’t, it just should be.

Actually it’s Children’s Day in Turkey.  And the Feast of St George at the Vatican and in England.  Slay-a-Dragon Day somewhere.  International Talk like Shakespeare Day . . . I could go on.  Feadship’s Casual Water is headed upriver, if not uptown.

Others are going in all directions . . .

mostly southbound.

Grande Mariner was westbound on the East River to get southbound to the River City. Know that place?

Some are Sound bound, and

others like Ma Belle are headed La Belle Province.

I can’t keep track of Elizabeth.

Flowers are blooming and

it’s great out.  Make time to enjoy the holiday.  Oh . . . River City starts here.

All photos in the past few days by Will Van Dorp, who did the first “spring giddiness” here.

Recall the BOLO post?  Well, today out of the fog she arrived, albeit with an errand to run upriver first.

After a six-week run from Shanghai, of which about five days has been northbound from Colon, Panama, she checked into the Ambrose Channel this afternoon.

 

Dangling anchor means she’ll probably anchor before proceeding.

Unless I’m proven to have a fake story here, in the next few weeks we’ll see

Peking lose her restlessness and

float onto this long cargo deck.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

This post follows in the spirit of What Rip Saw 1 and 2.  And the Emma in question is she who wrote the New Colossus.  Her ghost whispered to me yesterday as I looked south from the Battery and saw among other things the muddy tinge to the waters, a hint of freshet from upriver.

First she just rambled a bit dropping references to all the Corsairs and locally-owned Valiant and Conqueror .  ..

She reminded me that Le Grand Bleu had been here before here (scroll) and here, as well as craft of the same type like Topaz and  Luna.  And something about mischief associated with yachts like Alicia . . .

Then Emma’s voice became clearer . . . “I have to revise it,” she said, and then trailed off a bit, almost a mumble, but

what I caught was

“From whence this storied pomp,” cried she

With averted eyes.  “Spare me your pompous, your show-offs,

Your superrich, your oligarchs of energy.

Back with Corsair, Valiant, and Conqueror;  I’ve seen it before.

Send instead your strivers, tempest tossed to me;

Otherwise my lamp matters no more.”

 

Then, Emma was gone, flown off with the wings of a gull.

All I have is this set of photos and a recollection of her thoughts, her voice, to share.

Another oligarchinaut whose vessel appears here is Abramovich, who gave this yacht to its current owner Shvidler.

Here’s more to keep a lookout for this summer.

It has suddenly gone from winter to limbo to spring, and that brings folks outside.

Out in small boats, meetings for dock plans,

surveying this strange place called NYC,

keeping bow watch,

racing geese,

or stowing wires . . .

 

 

 

it’s all easier on spring days like this.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous installments focusing on background.

Sometimes the partial reveal and the juxtaposition highlight what’s on the shorelines, like those triple deckers in Bayonne that would blend in perfectly in many 19th century mill towns.

Or the hugely forgotten Singer plant in Elizabeth, hugely forgotten by most residents of Elizabeth, that is.  Imagine, if someone could turn the clock back on that one, 10,000 people would have manufacturing jobs . . . either sewing machines, or

weaponry of all sorts.

 

But one detail on the bank over by the NJ-side of the Bridge caught my attention.  So I thought these beams would be trucked from the disappearing bridge to a scrapping yard.  How surprised I was when the crane lifted the beam off the truck not 1000 feet from where they’d been on duty for decades and

lowered them

one after the other

to what might be a series of trucks below.  I can’t quite see what becomes of the beams on the ground at Bergen Point.  And I think that’s the Passaic small boat.  ??

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  Keep your eyes open and stay safe.

or Bridge.

Below is a photo I took in October 2011 . . .

Also from October 2011, when the bridge looked like this,

squeezing under the roadbed looked like this, and

the McAllister stern quarter escort looked like this . . .

the mighty Maurania III, that is.  Here’s the complete post I did back then.

But five and a half  years have elapsed, not without change.  So earlier this week, Suez Canal in the KVK and under the Bayonne Bridge looked like this.  See the worker above the new roadbed?

See him now?

 

So this week it was Marjorie B on the stern, and

 

Ellen forward.

 

 

I hope to be around and doing this five and a half years from now to see what there is to see.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Yesterday I mentioned the request to help the Roaring Bull ferry project, and that’s now fully funded. Thank you.   Here’s another and more somber request that you might consider, the Captain Joseph Turi Memorial fund.

Sometimes posts just write themselves, like this one.  After seeing someone else post a photo of a large tugboat named Abundance and a barge named Stymie, I had to follow suit.  I tried unsuccessfully to find what or where Densa is.

Arctic Breeze as a spring morning dawns?

Ah . . . the good lord DOES have a village named for him upstate along the Erie Canal . . . , a village that’s also associated with other noteworthy folks.

Here I have a serious question . . .  is there a seacoast town anywhere where high school girls vie for this title as they do for such titles as Miss Apple Blossom?  Click here for some other crazy contests . . .

Oops . . I shot the photo too early.  Here’s a closer up view of what Michael Miller is pushing.

And if there’s a Suez Canal in the Kill Van Kull, might there be a Kill Van Kull in the Suez Canal?

And finally . . . do you remember Roaring Bull?  Well, they are a struggling ferry operation over Susquehanna, great people with a long history.  Maybe you can contribute some of your tax refund now and take a ride on the ferry later this summer.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Scrapper 1 focused on loading scrap from scows onto a bulker anchored in the Upper Bay.  Since then many posts, such as this one, have shown loaded scows pushed hither and yon in the harbor, and like this one, even down an ice-encrusted river.

Today’s post features a unit and a crew heading out bright and early to load scrap that once was the machinery of daily life.  In the shot below, I get the sense that the heat exhausting out the stack has just erased a segment of the Bayonne Bridge roadbed, cauterizing it.

Cauterizing is an extreme first aid term I’ve read about and grateful I’ve never had to perform.

I use the term here because this crew, small company, and 1960 machinery engaged in commerce illustrate how like a single organism really are the sixth boro and by extension the supply chain they fit so smoothly within.

Happy harvest, gentlemen.

All the rest could not happen without your part being played.

All photos and sentiments strictly by Will Van Dorp.

 

Here are previous installments of this title.  Marjorie B hurries alongside the container ship to assume position

closer to the bow, froth sprayed back by the head-on wind.

As they make their way through the gap,

all is lined up for the tight turn to starboard.

By the way, did you notice the landing net?

Well did you?  Actually I hadn’t either until later.

See the landing net stacked above the portside of Marjorie B?

Let’s roll back to a close up of the second photo, and there it is.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s always amazed by all the details I miss until I go back and look at the photos.

 

Guess the unit below here and

here?  Lots of similarities, and the one below was less than 10 minutes behind the one above, both westbound the Kills.

A and

B.  Guess now?

a is Viking pushing DBL 134.

B is new to the sixth boro, here pushing DBL 103.

New York and

New Orleans….

Viking, built in 1976 and powered at 4300 hp, is 132′ x 34′ and here pushing DBL 134, built in 1986, with capacity of 136k barrels.

Denali, built in 2010 and powered at 5000 hp, is 115′ x 36′ and here pushing DBL 103, built in 2005, with capacity of 101k barrels.

 

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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