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Washington,  under 26′, seems to have quite the power, given the froth shooting from her stern.

So is this a political post, you might have wondered . . . .

 

Nah . . . the visual was just too good to pass up.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Just to reiterate . . . random in the sixth boro these are.  And the other day, I felt blessed for reasons you’ll understand by the end of this post.  Here Atlantic Enterprise emerges from the Arthur Kill and heads for home in Newark Bay.  That church, “a scaled down copy of the great cathedral at Cologne,” makes this seem quite a European-inflected image.

I took all these photos that weather day last week . . . note how the rain in downtown Elizabeth washes out the Union County Courthouse tower.

A bit later Mister Jim enters the east end of the Kills and then

feigns a ship assist.

The mighty Patricia travels east for a scrap run.

 

as Janet D moves in the direction

of her base.

Why did I feel blessed . . . ?  In the same but of morning, I saw both Atlantic Enterprise and Atlantic Salvor

although not in the same frame, they must have met up in the DonJon yard over in Port Newark.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

A surprising feature of the sixth boro in winter is the fishing, dragging for clams.  And many thanks to Steve Turi for sending along this article about this fishery from north jersey.com.

Here are some previous winters’ posts about these boats.  And right about exactly eight years ago, I saw the greatest concentration of fishing boats here.

Successful fishing relies on knowing habitat;  famous statues have nothing to do with it.

The other day I thought about the irony of fishing here:  might be hazards near a tanker named

for a fierce reptile, Densa Alligator.

But it must have been a productive location.

Next time you enjoy a delicious bowl of clam chowder, think about these fisherman.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders whether there are more crude tankers like D. Alligator coming in this winter than usual.

 

 

Here are the previous weather posts.  Below . . . that’s easy:  it’s a local shower;  Evening Tide and Evening Light were in the rain, and I was not, yet.

But a half hour later at the opposite end of the KVK, the clouds were truly wild.  Is there a word for these conditions?  Again, it wasn’t raining at my location.

Air currents swirled beyond the busy waterway, l to r, Stolt Loyalty, Stone 1, Phoenix Dream, Kimberly Turecamo, and Hoegh Seoul assisted by Bruce A. McAllister.

The Stolt tanker passes Graecia Aeterna before meeting the wild swirl head-on.

Add one more tug to the mix.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who’d like to know what you call this type of fast-moving dispersal of fog.

 

 

That’s twelve hundred feet of France heading into Bergen Point.  Note the scale of 108′ McAllister Sisters near the bow.  Of course, this group of ships set a record back last summer and that was then eclipsed by early September with the arrival of CMA CGM T. Roosevelt.  But it is my first time to photograph a ULCV;  previous arrivals and departures were at night, or I was distracted or traveling.  Does ULCV apply to vessels of this size?

And if OOCL France looks a drab shade of grey, well, she left China on Christmas day and this is her first port since then.

Tailing straight back is Capt. Brian A. McAllister . . .  until

she gets the signal to

initiate the rotation, assisting the twin bow thrusters on the ship and

the other tugs:

Sisters, Marjorie B., and

 

and Alex.

That makes over 19,000 hp of ship-assist spinning OOCL France clockwise in front of Shooters Island.  For the record, this is my first time to catch one of the largest box ships in the Kills.  Details:  1200′ x 157′ and 144,044 summer dwt;  launched 2013 as NYK Hercules and 13,208 teu, i.e., over 1000 teu fewer than CMA CGM T. Roosevelt, photos of which I’ll post soon.

 

All photos yesterday by Will Van Dorp, who keeps watching the names and numbers in hopes of catching a larger vessel or an autonomous one.

 

YM Express backs into the Rose Bowl after leaving Howland Hook, with some assistance seen at the starboard stern quarter.

Once rotated toward the east, she passes Eric McAllister.

Note that whereas English is a strictly left to right writing system, Chinese is not.

Ellen assists  . . .

 

 

This is my first time to notice the “beware of the propeller” sign in Chinese.  I take it the rightmost character means propeller, but I could be wrong about that.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whose computer translates English to Chinese characters as below, speaks and writes/reads no Chinese, Mandarin or otherwise.

.

Suppose we go back to “random tugs 2,” which was 10 years and two and a half months ago.  What might be the same?  Answer follows.  These photos I took last week.  Alex and Capt. Brian were not around when I did the #2 post.

Craig Eric Reinauer was, but the barge RTC 103 likely was not.

In 2007, Diane B had a different name and was a Kirby machine.  Now she’s a creek-specialist and pushing John Blanche.

Here’s the best photo I got of Millville and 1964, the newest unit most likely to pass through the harbor.

Emerald Coast heads westbound.

Oleander passes Normandy.  Anyone know why Bermuda Islander (I got no photo.) was in town last week?

And Evening Tide is eastbound in the KVK.  So just by chance, if you look at Random Tugs 2, Evening Tide is there as well.

And since we started with a team of escort boats, have a look at these:  (l to r) JRT, Miriam, James D, and Kirby Moran.

All photos taken last week by Will Van Dorp.

Here are the previous posts in this series.  So what is this?

It’s an ultra deepwater geotechnical drilling vessel.  It’s not drilling in the Upper Bay .  .  .

although it has the gear to do so.

With that helo pad above the wheelhouse, it looks to be what is associated with ports like Rio and Fourchon.

“Fugro”?  The name goes back to 1962:  “On 2 May 1962, Kees Joustra launches his own firm, whose name translates as Engineering Company for Foundation technology and Soil Mechanics, in short ‘Fugro’. ”

Above Fugro Explorer takes on fuel from Emerald Coast.  I was fortunate to get these photos–she’s been in and out of the harbor several times in the past half year–before she made through the East River bound for New Bedford, where she has now arrived.  She would have been a sight to behold on the East River, but omnipresence is not easy to manage, even in our sci-fi 2018 world.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here’s more on Fugro, “Ingenieursbureau voor Funderingstechniek en Grondmechanica.”  Fugro provided one of the vessels involved in the search for Malaysian Airlines Flight 370.

And speaking of sci-fi, I’ve recently immersed myself in augmented reality experiences

 

Overcast warm winter days . . . they’re not give relief but also present interesting light.

Two tugs and the large barge approached, and truth be told, when I first saw the scene above I thought I might be looking at Millville pushing 1964.  Alas no.

I love this portal created in this light . . . although some New Jersey fumes lingered in that same atmosphere.

 

No, that’s not a s*…h*… slur on all of New Jersey; I’m just talking about the atmosphere, the air quality that morning in those meteorological conditions down by that area of the Kills.

I’ve remarked before how I’m impressed by the family tribute in the naming of this barge.  I’ve had two colleagues die of this disease, and it is truly cruel.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who hopes the fight is successful and soon.

Yesterday morning two container ships with length (loa) of 366 meters or more occupied dock space in Port Newark.  To my knowledge, no longer cargo ship has yet called here, and since they’d each been in port more than a day, I figured I’d get some photos of them outbound under the Bayonne Bridge.  One was 366 m x 48 m (144,131 dwt), and the other was possibly 367 m x 42 (116,100).  Either would be great, both would be superb.

And remember last month I had the photos of JRT Moran underway moving astern?  Well, check out the photo of James D Moran below, on a towline with the 367 m Gunhilde.

I’ll identify these tugs (l to r) so that you can trace their evolution in this turn.  James, Brendan, JRT, and Kirby tethered to the stern.

 

Translating that 42 m breadth, I count 17 containers across.

James D efficiently drops the line and pivots to starboard.

 

Here I assume Brendan is still on the portside.  Was Miriam (farthest left) involved all along or simply passing through?

In that clutch of three Moran tugs, 18,000 horsepower labors.

Kirby Moran is still on the towline.

 

x

Ringkøbing sounds like a pleasant place to visit in summer, not really a port.

So here’s a puzzle:  Gunhilde left port around noon yesterday, but by evening she was back after merely traveling to the outside of the Ambrose Channel , making a wide turn to port, and then re-entering the Channel to anchor overnight in Gravesend Bay.  As of this writing, she appears to have set out for Norfolk once again.  Any stories?

Also interesting, if the AIS info was correct, Gunhilde arrived in NYC after a nearly 19-day voyage from Salalah, the old spice and incense port.  Look it up.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders what Gunhilde‘s air draft is.

And as it turned out, the 144, 131 dwt vessel left port  . . . after dark.

 

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