You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘ship preservation efforts’ tag.

Here was the first in this series.  Guess the date these photos were taken?

Consider all that coal smoke.

As it turns out Dockyard III doesn’t always blow so much smoke. Click on this link if you wish, but what I find remarkable there is that Dockyard III and its sisters were built in WW2 for Murmansk and hence have the chimney-encasing wheelhouse (for heat) and an ice-strengthened bpw.

Adelaar dates from 1925.

Paddle steamer De Majesteit dates from 1926.  I saw her on the river in Rotterdam in 2014, and included her in a comparison of old passenger vessels here.

Dockyard IX, part of that same order that never made it to Murmansk, was completed in 1942.  Dockyard IX has been on this blog once before here.

Many steam tugs crowd the river below, but nearest the camera,  that’s Heibok 4, a floating steam crane dating from 1916.

SS Furie, dates from 1916.  I wrote about her extensively here in 2016.

George Stephenson had me fooled;  it was built starting in 2007, ie., she might be called steampunk.  I saw her in May 2014.

Hercules is the real deal steam, launched in 1915.  I was aboard her in 2016, as seen here.

And the answer is late May 2018 at the Dordrecht Steam Festival.  The photos come via Jan van der Doe from the photographer Leo Schuitemaker.

Looking at these photos, I’m again struck by the number of historic vessels preserved and in operating condition in the Netherlands.  Some are scrapped there of course.  Has anyone ever heard of the Dutch reefing boats to create North Sea fish habitat?  These, and I have many others from Jan and Leo I’d love to post,  have benefitted from loving restoration. Let me know if you want more steam tugs.

Amicitia, which I wrote about in 2011, is back to life after 60 years (!!!) underwater as a result of being bombed, not reefed, back then.

Do the Dutch have different financial tools that produces this fruit?  Is it because of their different attitude toward maintaining machines and buildings?  Are there just different priorities throughout Dutch culture?

A google search leads to this article referring to “artificial reefs around the world,” but the headline is quite misleading.

 

Thanks to Capt. William Lynch for calling my attention to a worthwhile project AND a chance to win a Harley Davidson.  The worthwhile project:  preserve the SS United States in some form.  Local 333 United Marine Division and Lombardi Harley Davidson have teamed up in a raffle.  Details available soon.

I took the foto below last fall in Philly.  The street sign there says, in my interpretation, let’s not walk away from this. 

Right now the liner languishes while its sorry state gets used to direct consumer eyes.

While thinking about buying a raffle ticket, enjoy some diverse fotos, some from this week and others from a few years back:  Austin and Timothy L. Dace Reinauer.

McAllister Brothers

Craig Eric Reinauer with fishing boat nearly chummed.

Barker Boys

Dory Barker

Captain Lynch, thanks for the info on the raffle.

And while I’m telling some news, don’t forget the “Tugboats and Waterfront Scenes” exhibit at the Waterfront Museum in Red Hook.  The artist, Rich Samuelson, will be there today, May 22, between 3 and 7 pm.

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