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Thanks to Bjoern of New York Media Boat, it’s  . . .  LCU 1657.  This was last week, March 2022

At first glance I thought it was a landing craft with a large add-on wheelhouse.  Later I noticed the landing craft was being pushed by a small tugboat named Pierson.  I’m not familiar with this unit.  LCU 1657 was built by Defoe Shipbuilding in Bay City MI in the early 1970s.

George Schneider sent me these photos from July 2021 in San Diego of a very similar if not identical vessel.  He writes “LCU 1648 was built in 1955 by Marinette Marine in Wisconsin.  She is not a commissioned warship, and is considered a ‘boat’ in the Navy hierarchy.”

From August 2021, here’s something unusual.  George writes “the remote-controlled prototype Sea Hawk passed us to the South.  I was still on the bow [of my vessel], and although she was up-sun, I still got some good, clear shots of her.  Then, just to be a nuisance, I called our bridge and asked if they could get the Sea Hawk to turn around and pass down our starboard side for better lighting.  The Captain didn’t dignify my call with an answer, but the Navy must have heard me, because that’s exactly what she did.  So I got excellent underway shots of her, plus

 

I got a shot of her boat number, which is slightly different than we thought.” 

Since the sixth boro is not usual Navy waters except during Fleet Week, we don’t get such exotic vessels here. 

We do see a lot of Vane Brothers vessels in the sixth boro and throughout the East Coast, but in August 2021, Delaware was in  . . . LA!  She’s currently working in Oakland CA.

Many thanks to Bjoern and George for use of these photos.

If you’re new on this blog, for the past 27 months I’ve been posting photos from exactly 10 years before.  These then are photos I took in June 2010.  What’s been interesting about this for me is that this shows how much harbor activities have changed in 10 years.

Tarpon, the 1974 tug that once worked for Morania and below carries the Penn Maritime livery,  is now a Kirby boat.     Tarpon, which may be “laid up”  or  inactive, pushes Potomac toward the Gate.

North River waits over by GMD shipyard with Sea Hawk, and now also a Kirby vessel.   Sea Hawk is a slightly younger twin, at least in externals and some internals, of Lincoln Sea.

Irish Sea, third in a row, was K-Sea but now is also a Kirby boat.

Huron Service went from Candies to Hornbeck to now Genesis Energy, and works as Genesis Victory.

Ocean King is the oldest in this post . . . built in 1950.  She’s in Boston, but I don’t know how active she is.

Petersburg dates from 1954, and currently serves as a live aboard.  Here’s she’s Block Island bound, passing what is now Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Kristin Poling was built in 1934 and worked the Great Lakes and the Eastern Seaboard via the Erie Canal.

To digress, William Lafferty took this photo on 15 May 1966 at Thorold, Ontario, in the Welland Canal, same boat 44 years later.

And finally, she who travels jobs up and down the East Coast, the 1970 Miss Gill.  She’s currently working in the Charleston area.

All photos, WVD, who never thought a decade ago while taking these photos that I’d revisit them while in the midst of a pandemic.  June 2010 was a great month for photos, so I’ll do a retro a and b.

This post represents no more the definitive port of Tampa than a sampling of an hour’s worth of  traffic on the KVK, at the Brooklyn Bridge, or past the Holland Tunnel vents would be a definitive capture of the sixth boro of NYC.  I’m grateful to a nameless Nemo for these shots . . . like the coal-pushing Jason E. Duttinger and the barge Winna Wilson.

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Here’s the 6000 hp Duttinger out of the notch.

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As is OSG Endurance, 8000 hp.

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From l to r, Sea Hawk . . . 8000 hp, Valiant . . .also 8000,    and Linda Moran . . . 5100. I’m not sure what the small tug in the distance is.   Also, click here and scroll to see the last time Sea Hawk has appeared in tugster, painted green.

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And finally, what’s not visible in the photo below is Paul’s nose.  Click here to see a light bow-forward photo of Paul T. Moran.

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Again, many thanks to nN for these photos.

This NYPD officer of the peace got tugged right into a recent parade.  When that happens, you know all things could get downright disorderly.

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This last June post is a melange of Pegasus and Lehigh Valley 79 in a setting rays irritating my camera,

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Patuxent in the Philly dawn,

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Sea Hawk approaching the St. John’s Bridge,

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Patuxent redux,

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Natoma docked in the Columbia,

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Caspian Sea in the Delaware,

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Surrie Moran in the same waters,

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Aries in Portland,

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Madeline,

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Black Hawk,

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more Black Hawk, 

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Cape Henry,

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again Madeline,

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and finally Lewiston.

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Rounding things out, it’s Siberian Sea in palm trees country aka the sixth boro, taken about a year ago.  I will resume the blog as soon as I can in a land with more palm trees

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Thanks for reading the blog and sending comments either here or via email.  Sorry if I haven’t acknowledged everyone who’s sent along a tidbit or nice word.

If you’ve never taken a Working Harbor tour in NYC’s sixth boro, here’s info.  If you  know the sixth boro pretty well–especially the contemporary commercial aspects of it, you might even propose to them to narrate a tour.  That’s just me suggesting that, but there are folks who want to better understand the role of shipping and its interaction between the sixth boro and the five terrestrial ones.

Thanks to Seth Tane for the fotos of Aries, Black Hawk, Lewiston, Nahoma, and Sea Hawk.  All others by Will Van Dorp who hopes to next post from the obscure January River.

Need sunglasses for this drama on the Hudson?   “Random” means … spotted  in a plethora of places, like Elizabeth, passing the Hudson waterfront at dusk with a barged Weeks crane 532 in tow.  Note the Crow or Cheyenne in push gear with barge on the far left.

Paul T Moran at Gulf Marine Repair in Tampa.  Not to be insensitive to customary modes of dress, but–as east river pointed out– doesn’t this vaguely like a burka or abaya from the eyes down on the tug?

Justine McAllister pulling a light RTC 120 south of Catskill.

Atlantic Coast pushing Cement Transporter 5300 south of –you guessed it–Cementon, NY.

Meredith C. Reinauer pushing a loaded RTC 150 toward the Highlands.   By the way, if you’re looking for a fun read, try the novel by T. C. Boyle called World’s End . . . my current source of chuckles.

Sea Hawk in Brooklyn Navy Yard last June appearing tied up to sludge tanker North River.

Connecticut (1959?) crosses the Sound north to south.

That’s it for now.  Thanks to Deb DePeyster (who previous contributed to this) for the foto of Elizabeth,  and to eastriver for the foto of Paul T Moran.  All others by Will Van Dorp.

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