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This post, beginning with Miriam Moran juxtaposed with downtown Newark NJ, is intended to demonstrate just how diverse the sixth boro is, in terms of vessels and shorelines. Has Miriam been in the sixth boro all of its 40-year career?

Ernest Campbell is 10 years older than Miriam, and did the better part of a decade up in Alaska.

Sapphire Coast, stemming here in the East River just off Rockefeller University, was launched in 1982.

In the KVK, Stephen B, 1983,  is trying to pass as Hen B.

Pacific Reliance, launched in 2006, was designed for long hauls.

Kenny G, in its distinctive blue livery, has appeared on this blog several times, but I’ve never learned where and when she was built.  Here she’s working on refurbishing to Pier 40.  Check out this link to Pier 40 as a prep to a series I’m starting in a few days.

At one point, C. F. Campbell was in the same fleet as the vessels that became DonJon’s Atlantic Salvor and Atlantic Enterprise.

And finally, it’s Harbor II, as before, in the Harlem River with the 44th precinct NYPD station in the background.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

OK, I know today is blue skies and clear air, but yesterday I stood in the rain at the Narrows waiting for an exotic vessel that I knew wouldn’t arrive for a while.  But around virtual sunrise . . . virtual because the sun never rose or set all day . . . this was in the offing.

Since Mary Alice was involved, I had assumed it would be a floating crane or a dump scow.  Mary Alice is to the right, light blue, DonJon blue.   But along with her are Normandy, Treasure Coast, and Sapphire Coast.

By this time, I’d put together that I’d learned that the “dead ship” that had arrived about two weeks earlier was the first of two coming to GMD Brooklyn.  They were moving “slow bell,” which was fine by me, because the vessel I’d come out to see was still . . . at sea.

Some changing-up took place in the alongside-tow before they came through the Narrows.

I mastered holding an umbrella while framing the shots;  the secret was repurposing a garbage can against the railing, which worked because there was drizzle but no wind.

 

Once I got the photos home, as so often happens,

I could make out the “riding crew” on the dead ship.  Previous dead ship posts on tugster can be found here.

Sapphire Coast (4860 hp) by now has moved to the apparent port side.

Normandy brings 1900 hp and Mary Alice . . . 3000.

Here’s more riding crew.

Scan through here to find context for these vessels . . . C4-S-58a . . .

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who thinks some vessels look just right on rainy days, better than on sunny days.

All the photos in this post I took over a two-hour period Friday.  I post this in part in response to the question raised by a commenter recently, how many tugboats operate in the sixth boro, aka the waters around NYC.

They pass one at a time,

you see them in twos . . . . and that might be a third with the crane barge off the Battery in the distance,

a trio might be assisting a single ULCV,

foreshortening might collapse four into a single shot, and

if you look across the repair and docking yard, you might see five tugs plus one science boat.

And finally for now, move the huge box ship away, and six of more are revealed.

This is the sixth boro, folks, one of the busiest ports in the US.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

It’s always a joy to be under way on the Hudson.  Enjoy these shots from last week.

Stephanie Dann passes a chimney of what may once have been an ice house.

Click here for previous Stephanie Dann photos.

With the Rip Van Winkle Bridge in the background, Sapphire Coast approaches pushing Cement Transporter 1801.

 

 

Near Catskill she passes Coral Coast with another cement barge.

 

And here my first time to see the rebranded Kristin Poling, moving Eva Leigh Cutler.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Kirby Moran here seems to have some symbiosis going on with the gulls,

and Jonathan C comes in for a closer look.

Zachery Reinauer repositions light under the parking lot forming on the lower deck of the Bayonne Bridge.

Diana B moves another load of product, likely to the creeks.

 

Thomas D. Witte is on the paper recycling run, I think.

Does anyone have a photo of her working up in the canals?

I’ve not yet seen Sapphire Coast light.

And finally, the unique paint scheme on Balisco 100 

moved into the Kills by Navigator.

 

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here  are the two previous posts by this title, and more.

Juxtaposed boats invite comparison, allow perception of subtle difference, here between Marion and Doris.

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It also gives a sense of the random traffic patterns, here about to pass the impatient Peking are (l to r) Michael Miller, Charles Burton, and way in the distance Robert E. McAllister.

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Here , a few seconds later, Charles Burton‘s barge CVA-601 is about to obscure Chandra B–on a ship assist?– and Miriam Moran.

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Here, from l to r, it’s Sapphire Coast, Charles Burton, Evening Mist, Ellen S. Bouchard, Robert E. McAllister, Scott Turecamo, and Erin McAllister.   cg2

And a quarter hour later and from a different vantage point, it’s Stena Companion, Cielo di Milano, a Miller launch, Maersk Phoenix, and NCS Beijing.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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