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A few days ago I posted this twilight view of Service Boat No. 1.

So, I hope she ‘s more defined by these shots from a bit later in the port of Montreal, as she passes Toronto Express.

 

Ocean Macareux (translates as “Ocean Puffin”) follows the grain elevators on her way to –maybe–

attach some rendering. . . .

Farther along, a spud barge moved by GFFM‘s

Vent Polaire (tr. Polar Wind) seems standing by, assisted by this very

shallow draft prime mover.

Over by the Beauharnois Dam, Deschenaux (tr. Channels) stands by.

Click here for more info on the Beauharnois generating station.

Anyone know where and when Deschenaux was built?

Farther upstream yet, in Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, it’s Circle Polaire (tr. Polar Circle)

And closing out this post, Ocean A. Gauthier here heads downstream to assist Rt. Hon. Paul J. Martin return to a floating condition. I believe she’s still undergoing repairs in the port of Johnstown ON.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

And let’s make these mostly blue . . . Ocean Groupe, and mostly tugboats.  I took this photo six weeks ago in Montreal.

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Ocean Stevns and Ocean Delta were at the home dock in Quebec City.  Birk Thomas had caught Ocean Delta here once four years ago.

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Here’s Ocean Rusby, an incomplete and nameless vessel (Cecon Excellence?), and an Ocean pilot boat.

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Ocean Henri Bain and a small fishing boat lie across from the pastoral Ile d’Orleans.

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Kanguk II –a NEAS (Nunavut Eastern Arctic Shipping) small tugboat–appears to be a sister to Qimu here.  Along the port side of Kanguk II are barges for delivering containers from ship to shore.

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In Montreal, it’s Ocean Serge Genois and (possibly) Ocean Intrepide.

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Closer to the city, it’s Ocean Pierre Julien and Ocean Georgie Bain.  I don’t know the names of the two smaller boats to the right.

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These smaller workboats include OC 32

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La Trenche, and an unidentified boat underneath this bridge to NYC.

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Will Van Dorp took all these photos.

You saw this vessel in an earlier post.  It’s back from the Arctic for the season, most likely.

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We steamed through the night, so here’s our vessel already in Ogdensburg on a rainy morning. The river separating the US from Canada here is about a mile wide.

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There was a time when folks who backed the wrong horse fled the US as refugees.

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The land you see in the background is US.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Again, with limited wifi, it’s mostly photos, these all taken around Montreal.

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Below is the MSC ship we followed on the approach to Trois Rivieres.

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The green hull is loading and the brown, discharging.

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See the grain elevator and the MSC ship in the distance.

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The new Champlain Bridge is going up right next to the old one.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’ll reprise some of these vessels in later posts, but this traffic we passed or followed unbound from Quebec City.

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Umiavut serves the Canadian Arctic.

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Ocean Traverse Nord has been featured in earlier posts.  Here she’s at capacity with dredge spoils from Lac St. Pierre and off to the release site.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

This series goes back to 2006, when I had no idea where it would end up a decade on.  Click here to see past installments.  All the photos in this post I took between Prescott ON and the start of the Beauharnois Canal.

Below . . . it’s the light at the location of the Battle of the Windmill.   Some of the charm of seeing this borderlands is learning of the obscure events of US-Canada history and the little remembered or mentioned groups like Hunter Lodges and the so-called “patriots” of the Patriots’ War.

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Here’s the active monument to commerce at the port of Johnstown, ON.

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What prompts me to do this post is a recognition of the beauty little seen.

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More Mississagi soon, but for now, the self-unloader is offloading upstream of the Iroquois Lock.

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This wall leads into the Iroquois lock, which doesn’t always close.  It’s a check lock.

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This is the same dairy farm off the port beam and

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the stern.

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We meet Thalassa Desgagnes upstream of the Eisenhower Lock.

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These transmission lines come off the Moses-Saunders Power Dam, crossing over the River at Massena.

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Dog swimming on a leash?

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Singer Castle, it’s not.

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Singer Castle, 50 or so miles upstream, this is. 

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And these are the Adirondacks, as seen from the River downstream of Massena.

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This looks like the Eglise de Saint Anicet, QC.

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Labrador here is just upstream of the first lock in the Beauharnois Canal.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

What’s this . .  a catatug?  A joke of meowman or purr people?  But first, have another look at more Ocean blue tugs posted on this blog before, including the one once called Helen M. McAllister.  Click here and scroll.

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All the photos today were taken in the port of Montreal.  Let’s start with Ocean Georgie Bain.

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Here are more shots of Ocean Intrepide.

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And that red vessel in the background, here’s

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a closer look at Peniche and beyond her what I first was a Montreal fan of meow man’s literature.

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MSC Donata here is getting an assist from

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two Ocean tugs,

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Ocean Pierre Julien and

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Ocean Serge Genois. 

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And that returns us to the top photo, seen in its entirety here, Ocean Catatug 2 

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pushing Weeks 235 with some unidentified structural steel, probably related to the new bridge over the Saint Lawrence. So far, Ocean has two of these catamaran tugs.

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Closing out this post, it’s Blizzard Polaire.

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I know there were Ocean vessels in Sorel and Trois Rivieres, which I missed.   Maybe I’ll see more next time, and I certainly want to see any and all in icebreaking activity some winter soon.   all photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Where has the time gone since I did Ocean Blue 1?  Well, it’s not been wasted.   Ocean blue seems at least as ubiquitous on the lower Saint Lawrence as  green-red G-tugs are to the upper Great Lakes watershed.

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I took all these photos near their Quebec City base, nestled beneath the illuminated G3 grain elevators so reminiscent of the ones in Buffalo.

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Right up front and center is Ocean Tundra, with Ocean Taiga looking over its starboard shoulder.  Are they still the most powerful Canada-built tugs at over 8000 hp?  I’m going to have to invest in winter layers so that I can come up in January and see these machines in ice mode.

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Ocean Charlie docks here too.

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Just in from an assist, Ocean Ross Gaudreault and Ocean Henry Bain return to base.   Click here for the particulars on all the Ocean vessels.

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Here Ocean Ross Gaudreault and Ocean K. Rusby assist a heavily laden Garganey.

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In the distance beyond Ocean Stevns, is that Jacques Cartier National Park?

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And what blue-hulled vessel is that in the distance at the shipyard?

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Ocean Guide does pilot exchange round the clock.

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More Ocean vessels tomorrow.  All these photos by Will Van Dorp, who’s eager to return to Quebec.

 

I’ve made myself back to the sixth boro by train now, and I’m succumbing to “train lag,” which means I’m allowing myself a few days to put up chronologically arranged photos before focusing on some scene that caught me and haven’t let go.  The Quebec City-Levis ferries are part of a huge network.

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The Coast Guard base is just below–way below–Château Frontenac, where a fateful conference took place in 1943.

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An excursion boat has as namesake a Quebecois–same guy the extra ‘l’ notwithstanding– who undertook a significant journey with a priest.

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Ocean has a huge base in the old port.  I plan a host of Ocean posts soon.

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I don’t know if Nordik Express still makes this journey, but I intend to find out.

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Django dates from 1928, but more than that, I know nothing.

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And finally, back from a job, Ocean Henry Bain returns from a job, passing the pilots’ station.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who recalls this morning as a day that lives in infamy.  In remembrance, check out the first photo here.

These photos were taken between just south of Montreal–which we passed at night–and just south of Quebec City.

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This is a fog bank north of Trois Rivieres.

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Wilf Seymour is a regular on this blog.

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Two Ocean tugs escort in a cargo vessel.

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When I’m home, I intend to search for more info on Soulanges of Sorel,

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as well as on Le Cageux.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

 

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