You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Rotterdam’ tag.

I’m going to play catch up, starting back in October.  This is Quebec City.

I’ve posted figureheads here and here before, even figureheads on a non-wind vessel like here.  But here’s a sequence that suggests that figureheads can come and go.  The first photo, taken at 10:22, shows the small push boat Vezina moving a convenient sized barge to

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to the cruise ship to

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offload the garbage.  By the time, I made my way to the port side, Vezina had acquired a figurehead and

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when the barge dumpsters were filled, there appeared to be some interaction between figurehead and crew, mimicry.

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I took these photos in October in Quebec City.

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I have no info on whether this figurehead has since been released.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Xtian has been sharing photos here for some time.  Now it turns out he and I were in the tiny dorp of Maassluis within days of each other earlier this month, as evidenced by his photo of Furie, which was in the same spot the day I visited here (and scroll).

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I would never have guessed RPA 14 is 31 years old!  Xtian certainly caught the light right here.

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Smit Ebro has been on this blog before, as in this post.

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Equipment on Husky?Make your guesses and on Monday or so, I’ll explain.

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Smit Cheetah and SD Seal . . . doing fire equipment training?

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FairPlay 21 … in between Smit Panther 

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and FairPlay 24 with still more Smit tugs in the foreground.

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Here’s part of the Kotug fleet.  From left, it’s unidentified, RT Evolution, SD Rebel, and RT Adiaan.  Click on each of the three links previous to see how different those three tugs are.

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Smit Hudson has been around since 2008.

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Click here for the entire FairPlay list.

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Many thanks to Xtian for these photos.

All these photos come through Fred Trooster.

Let’s start with the new build Noordstroom which wasn’t splashed until midMarch 2016.  Click here to see the triple-screw vessel at various stages of construction.

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Catharina 7 on the other hand, is from 1958.  Here she passes the Bollard.

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Here’s 1973 built Pacific Hickory.  I’m not sure what’s brought her to greater Rotterdam.

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And we end today’s post with Osprey Fearless, 1997 built.

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All photos by Freek Koning and via Fred Trooster.  Thank you very much.

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Again . . . with limited time available . .  I’ll leave the post to photos.

 

Imagine you are a diver sent down to inspect bridge foundations, and you discover, lodged against the foundation what appears to be a wreck.  That’s exactly what happened in 2002 below Queen’s Bridge in Rotterdam.

She was raised and investigation determined her to be Amicitia, launched in Zaandam  as Henja in 1941.   She was then sold to owners in Arnhem, renamed Amicitia, confiscated by the Germans, and sunk in Rotterdam in 1943.

She’s now being restored by the Foundation for the Preservation of the Amicitia.

Thanks to Fred Trooster.

for all

these fotos.  i love the fact that flower boxes have a place in a ship preservation yard.

I’ll be back soon.

Fairplay 21 and crew were lucky this day back in 2009.  It lost power while assisting Lars Maersk into a berth.  It managed to get away.  Fractions of a second elapse between a story to tell and tragedy.

Here’s one of the captains of Fairplay 21, Joop Schaar, assisting a vessel into a berth in Rotterdam recently.  He was not on board in the first foto above.

Here is Fairplay 21 in drydock, Captain Schaar inspecting the hull.

Full frontal.

Lunch.  Fred Trooster, left, has supplied these fotos, giving us a “virtual gallivant,”  if you will.

Another shot of Fairplay 21 in port with a Zhen Hua vessel in the distance.

You may recall that a Fairplay vessel (an identical one) capsized in November 2010 while assisting a Stena ferry into port on a stormy dark late afternoon, resulting in the deaths of captain and engineer.    Here and here are youtubes of this tragedy.

I leave on my own gallivant off the continent  Sunday morning, and although I’ll try to get one more post up tomorrow, there’ll be a few posts appearing while I’m away, compliments of Fred Trooster, resident of Vlaardingen, my father’s hometown.   Dank u veel, Fred.

First, to get back to the mystery tug . . . It was taken in Dordrecht,  a city of about 120,000 whose history goes back 1000 years.  In this area about 20 miles southeast of Rotterdam, the rivers Noord, Oude Maas, Dordtse Kil and Beneden Merwede meet.  That foto–as well as all the others in this post– comes via Jan van der Doe, frequent commenter on this blog.  According to Jan, Dordrecht is the busiest shipping intersection in Europe.  It has been and still is very important for the inland shipping.

Tug below is Rotterdam, 22,000 hp, formerly owned by Smit, then Smitwijs, and now Switzer.  A foto of a Smit tug (or related subsequent) company towing bark Peking into the sixth boro appeared here.  Rotterdam towed SS France on its long journey to Alang here (scroll about halfway through).

Study this foto Jan took on the waterfront in Rotterdam;  look for odd features.

Info follows.

Dockyard IX is a 500 hp steam tug, currently owned by The Maritime Museum. It was built in 1940 for dockyard work and owned by the Rotterdamse Droogdok Maatschappij (literally, “Rotterdam Drydock Company”).  The stack location allows the skipper unobstructed view while towing and assisting during docking and un-docking.

Enclosing the stack in the house also solved the heating problem during the winter months, although I’m not sure what that means for summer.

Variable height houses are used in the Netherlands, like on Maasstroom 9 (1957), here near Vlaardingen (my father’s birthplace!!), and

Matricaria.  (Note:  in this link, check out all the wind turbines in the background;  the Dutch seem to have traded old model windmills for new.)

Left to right, MTS Vengeance (1988) and Koral (1976).

I love the colors.  Vengeance is UK-registered and Koral Maltese.

These last two foto make me wonder when last a foreign-flagged tug traversed the sixth boro.

All fotos by Jan van der Doe.  Jan, hartelijk dank.

Unrelated:  I’ve NOT seen Rosemary McAllister for some time now.  Anyone know where she is?

Updates on Mon Lei, see Matt at Soundbounder.

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