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i.e., the 19th month in a row that I’ve posted photos from exactly 120 months before.  Well, although it’s not always this hazy, the Statue still looks the same, but

Responder no longer carries that boom or works in the sixth boro, and neither that bridge nor Coho looks the same.

Coral Sea Queen has been reconfigured into a trillion recombined molecules, and

June K is no longer orange.

That part of the skyline is the same–maybe–but Lil Rip has not been in this harbor in quite a while.

This Rosemary is no longer here nor painted this way, and

John Reinauer . . . I’d love to see her since she transited the Atlantic to work in the Gulf of Guinea.

Flinterborg released these Dutch sailing barges in the waterways of another continent . . . and Flinterborg has not returned that I know of.

Penn No. 4 is laid up, I think.  Does no one use the term “mothballed” any more?  I’ve never mothballed clothes, for what that’s worth.

Laura K Moran works in Savannah, with occasional TDY in other ports, I’ve noticed..

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who himself is no longer the same person he was in October 2009.

Let’s go back to September 2009.  CMA CGM Marlin, launched 2007,  was the standard size back then . . .  The 5092-teu vessel has since been scrapped, after only nine years of service!!

Over a dozen sailing barges came to NYC to sail in New York waters in commemoration of the 400th anniversary of the Half Moon arriving here all those years ago.  Here are more posts from back then. Groenevecht, below, is a 2000-built replica of a lemsteraak.

Also in town to celebrate were Onrust and HNLMS Tromp. Here’s more on Tromp.

Old and new came.  On one end of the spectrum was Day Peck, 

her great hold still waiting to be transformed into museum.

Urger still operated, here sidling up to Lehigh Valley 79.

A different Rosemary McAllister worked here.

Irish Sea (1969) was still at work.

Yessir, stuff changes.  All photos in September 2009 by Will Van Dorp.

 

I’ve mentioned before about my people the Dutch celebrating “old years day” on December 31.   As the child of immigrants, I’m blessed by this one of many ways they see the world differently, a perspective I’m happy to share.  So here is a retrospective of the year, the result of a process of scanning through photos in the blog library, not overthinking it.

January.  Gunhilde Maersk with James, Kirby, and JRT plus Miriam Moran.  the year of the 1200-footers aka ULCVs becoming commonplace in the sixth boro.

February.  Ocean Henry Bain serves as a safety boat during  the ice canoe race I documented in my Carnavalons posts.

March. Cerro Grande here escorted a Caribbean-bound LNG ship, one of all the Panama Tugs posts

April. When I saw this section of drained canal bed between O-6 to O-7 in Oswego, I thought the work’d never get done before the season began, but I was wrong.  Of all my 2018 NYS Canals posts, this and this posted with the greatest urgency.

May.  Reliable pushed seaward by Lucy H.  As of today, Reliable lies under the sea gathering fishes and entertaining Davy Jones near Shinnecock.

June.  Jay Bee V headed out on a high-profile mission.  Has she returned to the sixth boro yet?

July.  I missed Rosemary‘s christening because that’s what happens when you don’t look at your calendar. First come first serve for a few tugster lighthouse calendars.  Send me an email with your mailing address.   As I said, I ran a few extra when I made up my Christmas gifts.

August.  Kimberly Selvick with AEP barges was one of the treats I saw in Calumet.  This day south of Chicago planted a seed of curiosity about the Lake Michigan/Mississippi River link I hope to be able to explore in 2019.  Many thanks to Christine Douglas.

September.  J. W.  Cooper delivers a pilot in Port Colborne at the Lake Erie end of the Welland Canal.  Because I hadn’t a satisfying enough fix from the canal earlier, I returned there in October.

October.  One Stork, a pink ULCV,  came into town.  It wasn’t her first visit/delivery, but it was the first that I caught.  She’s currently in the sixth boro.

November.  Morton S. Bouchard IV rounds Shooters Island light, Bouchard celebrated a big anniversary this year.

December.  Ruth M. Reinauer heads west into the Kills in December, the start of heating oil season.

And that’s it for the year, time for me to securely lock up Tugster Tower and prepare myself to meet 2019.  The older I get, the more profound is my awareness that although I make many plans for a new year, I might not see the end of it.  It’s just how it is.  Every day is a blessing.  Last year had my own personal ultima thule; I pray that 2019 brings its new ones.

Thanks to everyone who read, commented, and assisted me in 2018.  Happy and constructive new year day by day to you all.

One satisfying thing to me about these retro posts is noticing how much the local fleet has changed.  All these photos I took in November 2008.  Coral Queen was scrapped at least eight or nine years ago.  Maersk Donegal has had two name changes since 2008, now know as Santa Priscila, and no longer calls in the sixth boro.

SPT Guardian, still under the same name, is currently operating out of Lome, Togo.  Note the NJ State Police boat alongside.  I don’t know if they are still using that boat.

ITB Groton is gone as well.

The huge K-Sea fleet in the boro has dispersed.  Solomon Sea is now Emily Ann,

Falcon, I believe, is still Falcon but wears Vane livery,

Davis Sea still has the same name but Kirby colors and operates in the Gulf,

and Aegean Sea carries the same name but works for Burnham Associates in my old stomping grounds north of Boston.  NYK Diana has moved to the Pacific to the US West Coast.

This Rosemary McAllister has been replaced by another Rosemary McAllister, and has spent only part of one day in the sixth boro.

Stapleton Service takes the prize for the greatest number of name changes, three since 2008.  She’s now Michael Miller.

Buchanan 15 has become Dory, although I’ve not seen her in a while.

Coral Queen‘s smaller fleet mate was John B. Caddell, which became a hurricane Sandy victim:  grounded, sheriff auctioned, and scrapped.

I made a jaunt upriver aboard the only and only Half Moon–now sold abroad– in November 2008, and saw

Champion Polar but she’s now

–ice bow and all- dead and likely scrapped,  as well as

a more intact Bannerman’s Castle.

All photos by Will Van Dorp in November 2008.

 

 

Ten years ago, a Rosemary McAllister arrived in the sixth boro.  I took the photo below on July 13, 2008.

That Rosemary is now Audrey, just Audrey.  Among other specs, that 6000 hp tug  is Tier II compliant.

The photo directly above and all those below I took yesterday, as she arrived in the sixth boro.  There was a christening, but elsewhere snagged me.

Let’s compare them:  at 100′ x 40′, this new Rosemary is almost 10′ longer and 4′ wider.

Powered by CAT 3516E Tier VI engines, she generates 6770 hp, compared with 6000 hp for her predecessor.

Today was the day to see her here, as she seems to have headed back to Norfolk right after the christening, and will arrive there by midafternoon.

Click here, here, and here for posts I did about the 2008 Rosemary.   The third link there is of Rosemary‘s christening along with Timothy in September 2008.

As was the case 10 years ago, Rosemary shared the christening yesterday with Capt. Brian A. McAllister, a twin.  Here’s an article from Workboat.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

I did this once before here.  This time I was deleting near duplicates to limit the size of my photo library to accommodate the many photos I brought back from the gallivants, and my mind quickly formed today’s post.  Enjoy all these from August through October 2009 and marvel at how much the harbor changes.   As I went through the archives, this is where I stopped, given the recent developments in Bella Bella BC.

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For background on this tug, check here.

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Notice also the Bayonne approach to the bridge.

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IMO 8983117 was still orange back then.

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King Philip, Thomas Dann, and Patriot Service . . .

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Odin . . .  now has a fixed profile.

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And these two clean looking machines — Coral Queen and

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John B. Caddell — were still with us.

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This is a digression to March 2010, but since I’m in a temporally warped thought, let me add this photo of the long-gone Kristin Poling.

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Back to 2009, Rosemary looked sweet here in fall scenes.

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John Reinauer . . . I wonder what that tug looks like today over in Nigeria.

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And Newtown Creek, now the deep Lady Luck of the Depths, sure looked good back then.

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And while I’m at it, I’ve finally solved a puzzle that’s bugged me for a few years.  Remember this post from three and a half years ago about a group of aging Dutch sailors who wanted to hold a reunion on their vessel but couldn’t find the boat, a former Royal Dutch Navy tug named Wamandai A870?  Well, here’s the boat today!  Well, maybe . . .

Another boat you can dive on is United Caribbean aka Golden Venture.

Photos and tangents by Will Van Dorp.

 

Weeks’ Elizabeth has sharp chines.

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A hint of Dr Jekyl/Mr Hyde in United Banner.

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Susan Miller with spud barge, almost full frontal.  Completely full frontal of anonymous gull.

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Oxygen . . .  Don’t those anchor flukes look a bit like . . .  eyelashes?  What was that odd eyelash conversation I had recently?  Kimberly Turecamo to starboard and Laura K Moran to port.

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Adriatic Sea emphasizes the vertical; bow wave defines the horizontal.

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John B. Caddell with very little freeboard.

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Linda Moran: difficult to anthropomorphize once I see the stacks as horns, unless the stalk plus upper wheelhouse plus mast is perceived as unusual headgear.

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Newtown Creek moves in with goal posts.

aaff7What would Rosemary McAllister look like with a Cornell-esque pudding?

aaffrmKT Venture is the first bulker I’ve seen offload salt directly at the Atlantic Salt dock, site of the late August Salt Festival.  More KT Venture soon.

aaffssKatherine Walker approaches, with a buoy in each cheek.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

OK, as Jed points out in his quite elaborate comment (thanks, Jed)  . . . it’s PCU (pre-commissioning unit) New York for a few days yet.  By the way, by the count of A. G. Sulzberger, this new New York is USS New York number seven.  Might it be that the cost of the previous six combined is less than the cost of this one, comparing uneven dollars?

Behold Sturgeon Bay, the generosity of whose captain and crew made these fotos possible.

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Looking through my fotos prompts a thought on this ship welcome and our group identity.  We all have competing identities, and obviously this dozen plus one fotos taken over five hours were deliberately selected, but see where they lead you.  I’ll share my ideas at the end.

Sturgeon Bay, one of nine WTGBs,  receives a small boat long the starboard side while outbound to meet . . .

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LPD-21, which here heads north toward a water welcome and past

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Our Lady of the Sixth Boro (and so much more)

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and soon to pause across from North Cove (fantastic images here).

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After heading north as far as the GW Bridge, LPD-21 turns and

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makes its way close to the bank near 130th Street where another water welcome awaits.  Later,

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an escort follows on the Jersey

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side as  (Note:  PT728, DCV Gelberman, and tug Miriam Moran in foreground;  color spray from John McKean 1954)

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LPD-21 crew enjoy the NYC and sixth boro greeting and sunny weather as

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the vessel is made fast.   Ellen McAllister and Rosemary McAllister here prepare to depart for their next job.)

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Refueling begins

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almost immediately from barge delivered by Houma.

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To say the fire departments were intensely involved in this welcome–as evidenced by both my fotos and those on the New York Times slideshow– is an understatement of huge proportions.  And of course reasons go directly back to that horror less than a decade ago that underlies everything about LPD-21’s existence.  And I certainly honor the Bravest.  I was happy to see you present on both sides of the River, all over the sixth boro.

And this is not to undervalue the efforts of all those folks working on the water yesterday in whatever capacity (public or private)  as part of ensuring that the welcome was appropriate.  This harbor enthusiast thanks you and all other of those working on the water.

Welcome to New York.

Here and here are a few articles about Lt. Scott Rae, commanding officer of Sturgeon Bay.

All fotos here by Will Van Dorp.

Seeing the Moran boats on the upper left side of this foto reminds me that I owe you an answer to Relief Crew 9‘s question, which herinafter, shall be dubbed the “tugsterteaser,” term coined by Jed.  Tugster teases maybe but always delivers.  Answer comes thanks to Harold Tartell:

“The year of that photo would be early 1962.  The M. MORAN (brand new but  doesn’t look it) has returned to New York from Pusan, Korea after towing a floating generating plant for the U.S. Navy.  She left her builders (Gulfport Shipbuilding in Texas) in Oct. 1961 and made the tow from there directly to Pusan.  The MARIE S. MORAN built in 1961 (now TERESA McALLISTER) and sister MARGARET MORAN (now BRIAN A. McALLISTER) were both built in 1961 by Dravo Corp., Wilmington Del.  They were on charter to Moran with an option to buy.  McAllister took them over with the same agreement later that year, and ended up buying them.  They were the first two tugs in McAllister’s fleet single screw with Kort Nozzles.”  Thanks Jed and Harold!

So back to more posteriors.  After reading the bottom paragraph of this post, decide whether to some the expression should be “negatively posterior”?

L. W. Caddell is a 1990 built 16′ breadth tug working around the Caddell yard.

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Christian Reinauer, 2001, 40′ breadth.

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Pati R Moran, 2007, 36′

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Zachery Reinauer and Thomas J. Brown, 1971 and 28′ and  1962 . . . 19′.

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Rosemary McAllister, 2008, 36′.

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And while we’re looking at sterns, here’s an unexpected detail on Peacemaker, a boathouse behind the fold-down stern.  Bowsprite sends along this foto.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp, except the last one.

And some discoveries lead me to reiterate my creative commons licensing.  Fair is fair.  More on this later.  But please comment on this:  what should I do if unauthorized use of my work turns up?  What would you do?

Unrelated first:  trimaran Zamna . ..  was identified by Soundbounder‘s Matt Housekeeper, foto’d by Bowsprite’s magic lens in September, and posted on asleep-at-switch tugster twice… most recently two days ago here (scroll to the end).    Here’s Zamna’s own site.  Is anyone who took fotos of it close-up at Chelsea Piers willing to share them here?  . . . apparently it’s currently sailing to Greece.   I’m especially curious about the figurehead.   Now back to stacks.

It appears a “stacks” series could go on a long time, but within a given fleet, stacks differ in shape, number, and relative size.  These fotos go back two or three years, so I don’t know whether all these boats still carry the red-and-white rings.  One is a trick:  it does NOT carry the McAllister name although it may belong to a subsidiary fleet.  Clues exist in the fotos, so I won’t give the names until the end.  See how many you can guess.  Remember, double clicking enlarges.

Single stack, squat but rounded and trapezoidal.  A single large tube protrudes.

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Single and tall, like a stoogie.

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Two of them, squat but rectangular and again trapezoidal.  One wider and two thinner protruding tubes in each.

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Single oval cylinder rising just slightly above the top of house, with two protruding pipes.

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Quite similar to the previous.

aafgReally high single with no tapering at all.  Has guy-wires.

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Ditto the first foto:  Single stack, squat, rounded and trapezoidal.  But two large tubes protrude.

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Like the previous but flanked by ladders.

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Paired but really squat relative to the house.

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Paired and flanking a companionway.  One large pipe protrudes quite far from each.

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Paired with a dividing companionway, flanked by ladders, and more acute angle in the protruding tubes.

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From the top,  the boats are:  Colleen 1967, Amy C 1975, Charles D 1967, Ellen 1966, Elizabeth 1967, Fournier Girls 1968, Helen 1900  [!!], Justine 1982, Marjorie B 1974, McAllister Girls 1968, Rosemary 2008, and Rowan 1981.

Charles D and Justine are both ex-Exxon boats:  Exxon Bayou State and Exxon Carquinez, respectively.  Elizabeth is ex-Fournier Boys and ex-J. A. Witte.  I’ve not seen Elizabeth in the sixth boro for quite a while.

And from yesterday’s post, why DOES Iona have only one “l” in its McAlister.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

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