You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Rod Smith’ tag.

Here are the previous posts I’ve done on the wind farm southeast of Block Island.  I took the photo below on June 27, as blades to spin the turbines arrived in Narragansett Bay.

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Rod Smith took the rest of these photos in late July and early August.

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It shows Brave Tern as it prepared to sail out to the farm, deploy its sea legs . .  aka spuds  . .

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and put the caps atop the columns onto the bases.

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For the specs on Brave Tern, you can check them out here,

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or here,

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or

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here.

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And check out the froth from her stern!

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To keep up with construction off Block Island, check out the Deepwater Water site.  Or for even more updates, friend them on FB.

Many thanks to Rod Smith for all these photos except the first one.

I hope to get out that way in October.

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Bear with me here.  Let’s go back to 1999.  Nicole Leigh Reinauer was built in Alabama Shipyard to push a 135,000 brl barge.  Look at the lines of this 118′ x 40 tug working with 7200 hp.

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Ruth M. Reinauer is Senesco hull # 202, 112′ x 35′ and 4000 hp. She is the first of the “facet tugs.”  As you can read in the link in the previous sentence, the design change was driven by easing the construction process of both tugs and double-skin barges.   If the shape of the reminder of tugboats in this post seem odd to you, read this interesting article by Casey Conley with a title that alludes to the (now retired) F-117 fighter.

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Laurie Ann Reinauer followed, same dimensions and power and hull # 203.

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Reinauer Twins came out in September 2011, same basic dimensions by greater horsepower . .  4720.

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I’m not sure what happened with hull#205, but #206 is B. Franklin Reinauer, 110′ x 33′ and 4000 hp.

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By the way, there’s a LOT going on in the background of this photo, including what appears to be dredge Atchafalaya in dry dock.

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Curtis is hull# 207, same numbers.

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Haggerty Girls is hull# 208, same numbers.

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Dean Reinauer is hull# 210, 112.2′ x 35′ and 4720 hp.

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And that brings us up to date with respect to Reinauer facet tugs . ..  it’s Dylan Cooper, operating less than a full year now, with the same numbers as Dean Reinauer.

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Note that it was exactly five years ago that we were following the trials and tribulations of loading the previous Curtis and Dean Reinauer  onto the heavy lift ship for West African waters.   I’d love to see photos of those tugs five years on and working out of Nigeria.  Does anyone out there have access to such?

For extensive documentation of many of these facet tugs during the building process, click here for the bulging albums created by Rod Smith at Narragansett Bay Shipping.

All photos of the handsome set of workhorses by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

This photo by John Curdy shows Dace Reinauer as she looked some time before 2008.

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I took the rest of these photos, including the one below showing the same boat in October 2009.  The next one was

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May 2014,

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early November in Narragansett Bay post-modification and during sea trails and

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taken by Rod Smith, and

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here was later November 2015 in the sixth boro.   The changes are more subtle, but if you compare the stacks, you’ll see the pairs has grown.

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Go Dace!!  Thanks, John and Rod.

Again, this post and the next dozen and a half or so have been “scheduled.”  I’m out of touch for a while.

Before I left, I’d modified the “About the photos” section.  If you feel so inclined, have a look at the first paragraph and comment.

Hats off and dinner on the table to Rod Smith of Narragansett Bay Shipping who put in a long day yesterday getting photos of the loading process of Half Moon onto the deck on BigLift Traveller.  Also many thanks to the hospitable crew of Traveller for accommodating Rod.

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I’m struck by how diminutive Half Moon looks here.

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Water-level . . . pre lifting straps and

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after.

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And then with hours of careful effort . . .

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like a netted fish after a long fight . . .

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she settles onto the deck.

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Next stop  . . .  Hoorn!

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The two last photos of Rod’s  .  .  . the night scenes . . .  suggest time travel:  imagine what Juet would have written in his journal 406 years ago if a big yellow ship had rendezvoused with them on their return to Europe and lifted them onto the deck for a speedy eastbound trip.  Click here for the never-completed blog version of  Henry Hudson’s 1609 trip . . . which lacks an account of THAT Half Moon‘s return to Europe.

Related photos include . . . ones of sister vessel Happy Dynamic, and here here and here  . . . some sampling of Half Moon photos over the years.

Less related:  click here for another Netherlands-bound vessel with a deck load, and here and  here for photos of the arrival of that deck load from a month earlier.

Again, Rod . . .Hartelijk dank . . . or Dziękuję bardzo.

 

Name this tug headed for sea as the sunset bathes it in ruby light?

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I guess this could turn into a precious materials post.  Hobo, this gold tug at the Costello shipyard in Greenport, appears to have been built 61 years ago by Caddell’s Drydock & Repair.  At this dock, it waits under the protection of this exotic creature of the winds if not waters.

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This 55-year old  . . . despite the distant port name carried on its escutcheon, is where?  Check the skyline.

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See the Chrysler Building off her port side?  Charlsea is currently in Weehawken.

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The ever-wandering Maraki  caught up with Kathy M recently in Eleuthera.

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And now . . . back to the ruby-red tug of the lead photo . . . . known as it leaves this port . . .

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as Roger Williams, a name soon

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to change.  Here she passes Castle Hill Light . . . as I said, bound for sea  . . .

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Credits here go to Rod Smith for photos of Roger Williams, Maraki for Kathy M, and all others . . . Will Van Dorp, who is expecting to make a comment about the laurels above the Graves of Arthur Kill cover . . . upper left side of this page  . . . soon.

Thanks again, Rod and Maraki.

As you know, I’m on the road in Georgia, but thanks to some good friends here are some fotos for your Boxing Day.  Back on the first day of winter, December 21, I got these fotos from Ashley Hutto:  Responder towing Ellen through the Kills.    Who knows . . . maybe this was a solstice version of Kills do-si-do?

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Here from a few years back is a post featuring both Responder and Ellen.

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And from Rod Smith, who labors on the site Narragansett Bay Shipping whenever he’s not working for bread-n-butter, here’s a shot by Rod in the wee hours of the same day, Haggerty Girls first trip to the sixth boro.  If you click here, you’ll see how Rod documented almost every week in the construction of this newest vessel in the sixth boro, taking almost 500 fotos over parts of three years starting from the time that two plates were laid down and joined.  Bravo, Rod, on this ongoing work.   That’s Matthew Tibbetts looking on.   Here’s more info on Haggerty Girls.

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Many thanks to Ashley and Rod.

No, this isn’t the January River.  I leave for there today, but this . . .   !!  These next four fotos come from the perspicacious bowsprite, taken yesterday afternoon.   The tug in the foreground is Sea Wolf is 1982.  In the background is –of course–Ellis Island, 1900.  In between with the yellow stack is

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Yankee, 1907.  Her long history includes a stint as Machigonne moving passengers across the sixth boro from Ellis Island to other boros and to NJ.   The tow began at the far right of this foto.

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More tugster on Yankee when I return, but before then, I’m sure there’ll be other info.

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Six plus years ago, a friend Mike caught these fotos of Sea Wolf‘s sister–Sea Lion–moving an unusual vessel named Abora III out of the Morris Canal to sea.   The reed craft made it more than halfway across the Atlantic.

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All fotos by bowsprite.  Advance notice came thanks to Rod Smith, who once worked as deckhand on Yankee and who will have his own account of this move . . . to Brooklyn.  Here (2007) and here (2011) are my previous posts with Yankee fotos from New Jersey.  Click here to get some backstory–and video of Sea Wolf departing with ferry– from a supporter who wanted to keep them on the watery edge of Hoboken.

Now, I pack and head south myself.    Vou escrever mais em breve.

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