You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Renee Lutz Stanley’ tag.

Here was 55.

Glenn Raymo took this photo in Germantown yesterday, the all-new Sarah D; previously I used these photos by Glenn.  Check out an example of one of many of his zazzle products here.

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Sarah D until very recently was Helen D. Coppedge.  Almost all these photos were taken by other people, but I add the next two I took in 2010 for comparison purposes.

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Also, new–as in out-of-the-shipyard new . . . it’s Barry Silverton, with the Fight ALS barge.  Click here for the story of the names. Many thanks to Allen Baker–click here for previous photos he’s shared– for this photo and to

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Ted Bishop for the photo below.

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This photo comes thanks to Renee Lutz Stanley.  It’s Lyman–I think–looking insignificant in one of the huge graving docks at the Brooklyn Navy yard.  Click here for previous photos by Renee.  Anyone know which dock this is?

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With news of a wooden boat found under a house during a construction project in Highlands NJ still –well news– what you see below are photos of another wooden vessel found during a construction project in Boston.  Many thanks to Tom Mann for these photos.  Here are previous photos from Tom.

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As soon as imaging is complete, it will be removed.

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Archeologists at the site believe it was a 19th century vessel delivering lime.

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Many thanks to Tom, Renee, Ted, Allen, and Glenn for photos used here.

Related:  Here’s a story about a shipwreck discovered during construction of WTC1.

 

Frying Pan came back to Pier 66 yesterday after several months at Caddell Dry dock, assisted by Dorothy J.  I use this photo with permission from Renee Lutz Stanley.

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It turns out that I also recently received a photo and spec sheet from barrel, formerly of the US Army Corps of Engineers.  When I looked up where Liston, the vessel below, was built, I

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learned that it was being built the same time as the lightship listed as Frying Pan Shoal.  First, it makes me wonder whether a photo exists that shows them both on the ways.  Second, I wondered if there was an error in shipyard site here about the initial name of the lightship, or if there was a time when the word “shoal” got dropped from the name of the vessel.  Third, the shipyard site says that LV115 became a museum in Southport, NC.  Click here and scroll through for a photo I took in Southport five years ago showing where some folks had wanted to build a museum with LV115 as the centerpiece, but it had never happened.

Some years ago, I used to spend a good amount of summer evening time at Frying Pan/Pier66.  If you’ve never been, you should try it once.  Here are some photos I took way back then. I must have many more somewhere.  Pier 66 opens in early May, and I think it’s time to have a large gathering there once again.  Let’s agree on a date and meet there, eh?

Many thanks to Renee and barrel for use of these photos.

But a closing shot, barrel writes:  “USACE TUG LISTON    became ARGUS of Salter Towing in 1970. #561597. At a later date became fishing vessel MR. J.C. now out of documentation.”

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Yesterday’s post led with Jared S aka Cheyenne II, and so I’m grateful to Jason LaDue for sending along a photo he took before she sank into the Genesee River, where she still lies.

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This next photo was taken by Renee Lutz Stanley, recently, as Pelham assisted the dead but lively Frying Pan to Caddell for some work.  This is my first time seeing Frying Pan away from her berth at Pier 66.  Previous posts with Frying Pan include this, this, and notably this;  in the fifth photo of the “notable” third link there, you get a little background on Frying Pan and its name, as well as see the location the lightship MIGHT have ended up at as mainstay of a North Carolina maritime museum, which would have put it much closer to Frying Pan Shoal.  Here and here are some recent posts with Pelham.

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The next five photos I took on a recent gallivant down east.  Little Toot, who works at Washburn & Doughty ( W & D) of East Boothbay, ME, appears to be a pristine-looking 1953 product of Roamer Boat company of Holland, MI.

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On the opposite side of the big blue shed at W & D is one of East Boothbay’s newest almost completed tugs, likely the JRT Moran.

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I saw Dorothy L (1965) twice while I was in the area inland from Monhegan, this time and once later but at about 0600 h and the light and motion of my ride didn’t lend itself to a good photo.

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And here are some from the sixth boro, Haggerty Girls in the notch of RTC 107, and

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And finally, a veteran . ..  it’s Freddie K Miller inside the water and

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out.  For a wide range of photos of this boat’s life, click here.

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Thanks to Jason and Renee for use of their photos.  For more of Renee’s photos of the Frying Pan move, click here.

And here, verbatim, is my call for collaboration for November posts.  Thanks to those of you who have already responded.

“And if you’re interested in collaboration, I invite your help for November posts.  All month long I hope to feature different ports–harbors–waterways and their workboats, which means not only towing vessels, but also ferries, fish boats, maintenance vessels, even yachts with professional crews.  I’ve been traveling a lot the past few months and have a fairly large backlog of boats from ports–harbors–waterways mostly in New England.  But as a social medium, this blog thrives on collaboration, so no matter which waters are near you,  I’m inviting you to send along photos of workboats from ports I might not get to.  I’d need at least three interesting photos to warrant a focus on a port.  Here are examples I’ve already done that illustrate what I’m thinking to do.”

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