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Here were 1 and  2.  Atlantic Salvor out front and Sarah Ann as steer boat make a working pair moving dredging spoils out for dumping at sea.

Here Salvor communes with itself in glassy morning KVK water.

Kristy Ann collaborates with Laurie Ann Reinauer to get RTC85 off the dock at IMTT Bayonne.

A pair of deckhands ride the huge pair of knees on Discovery Coast.

A pair of Vane barges, Doubleskin 32 and 36 . . .

… moved by a pair of Dann Marine newcomers, Chesapeake Coast and Discovery Coast with Seto Express on the far side.

And quite the pair

they are!

A lucky pair of Finns no doubt see the yellow Stolt tanker in the distance as an angel.  I took the foto of Stolt Invention four days ago as it entered the sixth boro in the afternoon fog.   From Rick Old Salt’s blog today I learn that on May 10 . . . less than two weeks ago, Stolt Invention saved the lucky pair  in mid-Atlantic after their sailboat began taking on water.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Interesting but completely unrelated:  coal dredging on the Susquehanna?  Check this out of Bone In Its Teeth blog.

Also unrelated inquiry:  Does anyone remember/have fotos of the heavylift ship in NYC harbor  1997 taking away the floating jail Resolution?  I’d love to see fotos.

x

Tugboats in the sixth boro of New York City vary not quite infinitely, but almost.   Consider Pegasus (1907)here with Lehigh Valley 79 (1914) alongside.  And my social medium tells me they’re about to link up and travel again soon.    Watch Pier 25.

And Coral Coast (1970) versus its fleetmate,

and newest tugboat in the boro .  .  . Discovery Coast (2012).

Amy C. McAllister (1975) and

Bohemia (2007).

Taurus (1979) and

James Turecamo (1969) along assisting Scott Turecamo (1998).

Thornton Brothers (1958),

Caitlin Ann (1961), and

Maria J (1958).

Rounding it all out . . . is JoAnne Reinauer III (1970), here passing the unmistakeable Torm-orange house of Torm Thames (2005), and see this spotlight by selfabsorbedboomer.

Having called this set almost infinitely varied, I must say there’s NOTHING operating in the sixth boro quite an unusual as Joseph Thompson Jr. (portions from 1944), the tug portion of an ATM unit currently working the North Coast between US and Canadian ports.   Thank’s to Isaac Pennock aka tugboathunter for introducing me to this vessel;  For the dizzying set of transformations, read the bio by boatnerd here . . . and follow the fotos, especially the ones by Mark Vander Meulen, Steve Hause, Lee Rowe, and Rod Burdick.

Foto of Discovery Coast by Joel Milton;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

I did this post just over a year ago; note the prominent change happening in the Manhattan skyline, as seen from the north coast of Rockaway Queens.  The last time you saw the tug shown here was December 2011.  Any guesses what Patty was towing yesterday?  Answer tomorrow.

Most of my views of the rising tower come from my “office” on the north coast of Staten Island.  It looms there, beyond these McAllisters,

Na Hoku,

Caitlin Ann,

Magothy,

Penn No. 6,

Thomas J. Brown,

Norwegian Sea,

JoAnne Reinauer III,

Hayward,

Elk River,

and Resolute.

Unrelated:  Following their own landmarks, a new crop of aeons-old silvery slime has reportedly returned to sixth boro waterways.    What . . . you ask?  Click here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Meredith C. Reinauer (2003, 7200 hp) and Kristy Ann Reinauer (1962, 2000 hp)

Hunting Creek (2011, 3000 hp) and my first view of her, not that I wouldn’t be able to predict what a Vane tug would look like.

Hunt Girls (1983, 1800 hp)

Coral Coast (1970, 3000 hp)

Buchanan 10, 1967, 1700 hp)

Thomas D. Witte (1961, 3000hp)

Linda G, 1943 and I have no idea how much power she generates, but that’s quite the tow she’s minding.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

I took this foto at 15:40 yesterday, and I’ll call it “prelude to afternoon golden hour,”  but this is a view of the turbine from the Battery Park direction. A few weeks ago, I recorded 18 minutes, so here’s more than twice that.

Geese head to wherever they go at dusk.

SalvageMaster passing Caletta ushers in the golden times, 16:30.

Over toward the Narrows, Hellas Progress radios in an initial departure call.   In the distance, Tokyo Express approaches.

Lucy Reinauer pushing barge RTC 83 exits the KVK, followed

Kristy Ann, her bronze and red color enhanced by the setting sun.

By the time Kristy Ann reaches the Brooklyn half, Tokyo Express has started her approach into MOT, and

Hellas Progress has spun around toward the open sea.

By now, it’s 17:10, temperature starts to drop as quickly as the color intensifies.

It no longer feels like summer in February, nor does it look like it.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

But first, bowsprite’s talked about her online art store for some time, and yesterday . . . officially, she launched it.    Please traffic it.  I wouldn’t want her till to look like the one I found along the KVK yesterday.  See the jam-packed cash drawer below.  Come spring it might be full of green.

I love it when traffic in the KVK is dense:  here (l. to r.) Mediterranean Sea, Siberian Sea (?), Margaret Moran, and Cosco Tianjin.   In the distance is Robbins Reef Light and the old Williamsburgh Savings Bank tower in Brooklyn.

Dubai Express, Austin Reinauer, and Brendan Turecamo.   Invisible on the starboard side of Dubai is James Turecamo.

Here a small Triple S Marine (Aren’t they based in Louisiana?) boat bounces past Lucy Reinauer.

APL Japan, Elizabeth McAllister, Marion Moran, and McAllister Sisters . . . I believe, with the Brooklyn skyline in the distance.

Meagan Ann and OOCL Norfolk . . . with cables of the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges in the distance.

Sea Lion pushes a barge of equipment ahead of MOL Endurance.

Among the pieces of equipment on this Mobro barge, what intrigued me was this Caterpillar designed to operate in wet places.

Finally for now . . . Beaufort Sea tails Maria J and Frederick E. Bouchard.

With traffic this heavy, I can see bowsprite will be very busy drawing and sketching while the robots staff the store.   Or maybe she could have robotos out sketching while she keeps the rust off her cash register?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

This short dozen tugboats chosen because they passed on a given part of a morning recently differ in size, age, tasks, and number of fleet siblings.  Less visible are their differing histories and crews.

Laura K Moran, 2008 built in Maine 87′ loa and 5100 hp here escorting in Ever Devote.  Below her is Caitlin Ann, built in Louisiana in 1961.  70′ loa and 2400 hp.

Vane’s Bohemia and Quantico Creek differ in many respects:  2007 v. 2010, 4200 v. 3000, Louisiana v. Maryland, and 96′ v. 90′ loa.

Below them, escorting Dubai Express,  is James Turecamo, 1969 built in NY, 92′ loa and 2000 hp.

Greenland Sea, built in Louisiana in 1990, 4200 hp and 112′ loa.

Below her is Barbara McAllister, 1969 built in Louisiana, 100 loa and 4000 hp.

Charles D. McAllister, 1967 built in Florida, 1800 hp and 94′ loa.

Margaret Moran, shown twice escorting Cosco Tianjin, 1979 built in Louisiana, 99′ loa and 3000 hp.

Two former SeaBoats tugs are now Mediterranean Sea and Weddell Sea, both built in Massachusetts and powered by 4500 hp.  Mediterranean Sea (110′ loa)  was launched in 2004; Weddell Sea  (105′ loa) launched 2007.

Finally, it’s Nicole Leigh Reinauer, Alabama-built, launched in 1999, 119′ loa, and 7200 hp.

All fotos this week by Will Van Dorp.

Late first snow this season unless you count the few flurries over the sixth boro last October, but flakes did obscure vision this morning.   Of course, Cheyenne is always recognizeable and busy, but Arabian Sea (in green) I had to guess at.

Laurie Ann Reinauer  . . . well, I could read the name on her derriere.

But Barbara McAllister I had to guess at.  (Harold corrects me . . .it’s Amy C. McAllister.  Thanks, Harold.) Snow flakes just blocked out the name.

Franklin . . . I know the profile AND can read the name even with my cokebottle glasses.

But I was looking for a good 10 minutes at this right in front of me and did not even SEE it.  No, not Sanko Blossom, but that new feature beyond her . . . that light colored structure obscured

now and again by a squall.  It wasn’t there a few days ago.

It’s good for my self-confidence that I saw the tower yesterday also, and got fotos of the 260′ tower then, over beyond Hanjin Albany.   Otherwise I might have suspected it came with the storm.   The blades weren’t turning, though, in spite of the wind, since it won’t go operational for a month or so yet. 

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s already wondering if Bayonne can be convinced to put bright colorful lights on the tower next December.

Maria J. Turecamo (1968)  and Hercules  (1961), side by side, and my psychic tells me Hercules may be about to set out on a long cold journey, over water.   Given the name, I’m inclined to wonder what Hercules 12 labors were/are and where on that list this journey fits.

Scott Turecamo (1998) and

Reinauer Twins (2011) wait with their respective barges.  Twins holds the distinction of being the newest tug in the sixth boro.

Norwegian Sea (1976) waits, but

Meredith C. Reinauer (2003) is on the move, as

is McKinley Sea (1981).

And most of them could carry Augie on davits as a tender.  Anyone know the age of Augie, here at a dock upriver?

Finally, another foto of Byrce Kirk operating Patty Nolan (1931) and still running.

Foto of Augie by Dave Williams, Patty Nolan by Seth Tane, and all others by Will Van Dorp.

So concludes this series . . . with total time elapsed from Qatar nosing around Bergen Point until Suez Canal Bridge‘s stern clearing the west side of the Bayonne Bridge  . . .  about 50 minutes.  Furthermore, a fourth vessel–Seatrout–traversed in that same time period, as did RTC 135, moved by Nicole Leigh Reinauer.

So while you’re enjoying –I hope–these fotos, let me do some math.  Using deadweight tonnage info available in that magic library called the internet, I total the cargo capacity of these four ships and one barge as  . . . 223,157 tons.  And I’ll assume (just an assumption for sake of discussion)  that each of these vessels was at its peak capacity.

While the math process is going on, enjoy the fotos of Ellen McAllister helping rotate Sea Land Mercury at Bergen Point.

Assuming that an average semi-trailer carries 20 tons of cargo, I come up with the equivalent of 11,157 truckloads of cargo passing below this bridge . . .   in 50 minutes!!

Now I’d love to see my illustrator or modeler/gamer friends depict the KVK as a highway and

run 11,000+ trucks under this arch in 50 minutes!  Read the thoughts of  Ellen McAllister captain here, thanks to gCaptain.  Another article on Ellen appeared here  in the Wall Street Journal today!

Imagine noise and fumes of 11,000 trucks/per hour . . . and impact on traffic flow.  The final shot here shows the stern of APL Qatar, Marion Moran, Seatrout, and the bow of RTC 135.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  As of this writing, Sea Land Mercury is already between Savannah and Mobile.

And if you’re wondering why none of these fotos were taken by the new camera, I was lugging it, but it confounded me by moving one of its own buttons and not working until I got home.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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Seth Tane American Painting

My other blogs

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Henry's Obsession

My imaginings and bowsprite's renderings of Henry Hudson's trip through the harbor 400 years ago.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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