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I vividly recall June 2010.  Let’s take June 3.  The two Hornbeck tugs there are Erie Service and Eagle Service, now Genesis Valiant and Genesis Eagle.  Minerva Anna is at one of the easternmost IMTT docks; today she’s eastbound in the Indian Ocean. But in the middle of it all,  GLDD’s Liebherr 966 was getting the channel down to 52′, if I recall correctly. Was that 966 dredge the same as New York?   In the distance the Empire State Building stood alone;  from this perspective today, you’d see WTC1.

Later the same day, and I don’t recall what the occasion was, Conrad Milster brought his big ship’s whistle down to South Street Seaport Museum, and ConEd hooked it up to ConEd steam pressure.  Hear the result here.  To date, this video has received 88,000 plays!!  Here and here are some videos of the legendary Conrad.  A few years later, I went to a marine steam festival in the Netherlands;  I took a river ferry from Rotterdam to get there.  When I stepped off the ferry and walked up the gangway to the dock, there stood Conrad.  Of course he would be there.

June 17 brought the return of Reid Stowe‘s schooner Anne after 1152 days (more than three years) at sea without seeing land!  Here‘s the NYTimes story.

Notice the toll the sea took on the paint.

For more photos of Anne, inside and out, click here.

As serendipity would have it, the day Anne returned, Artemis departed, going on to successfully row across the Atlantic in just under 44 days!  Recently, Reid has displayed art inspired by his voyage, as seen here.

June 26 John Curdy invited me to see a good bit of the Delaware River fronting several miles north and south of Philadelphia.  Overseas Anacortes was not yet launched at that time. As of today’s post, she’s in the Gulf of Mexico off Corpus Christi.

Here is Penn’s Landing and Gazela, which I sailed on later in 2010, but that’s a story already told here.

All photos in June 2010, WVD.

 

Last fall I caught Pioneer from outboard; yesterday I rode Pioneer on its trip to welcome back schooner Anne and play with Erin Wadder.  This post is mostly intended to document the first part of that ride.  Before leaving the dock, captain and crew confer.

This seasoned crew greets passengers as they transition from terra to aqua.

After the vessel slips into the East River,  crew tidies docklines.

Crew on the halliards raise the mainsail; then

coil and hang these lines on the shrouds, to keep them from free to run, should an emergency lowering of sails need to happen.

Bow watch signals oncoming traffic.

Pioneer skitters down the Bay quite nicely for a hull that served as a sailing sand conveyance a full 125 years ago.  Imagine a 1985 Mack dumptruck racing around with paying passengers in the year 2110!!

The winds inspiring Pioneer to skitter and scud also propel these other sailing vessels yesterday,  Anne farther and an unidentified sloop nearer.  Can anyone identify the sloop?

Scuppers port and starboard get a thorough rinsing.

Reid and Anne engage in some performance artistry with Freja Fionia.

The sloop tacks past again, and Pioneer, belly

in her sails, plays along.

A followup post soon will document Pioneer‘s return to the dock.  For now, sharing the air and water with us was a crew setting out on a formidable journey as Reid concluded his.  Artemisoceanrowing intended here to leave the sixth boro for a ride across the North Atlantic all the way

to the UK.  To be followed.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  See you among the merfolk tomorrow!

Welcome home, schooner Anne and Reid Stowe.  (Doubleclick enlarges the fotos.)  Quoth my favorite talking pigeon upon seeing these fotos:  “Na dat fella Reid him make too much gallivant long one.”  Mermaids and seamasters and dolphins and fish armies have decorated the hull nicely, adding outlandish

designs.  Reid waved as excitedly as he did 1152 days ago.   Click that link for NYTimes video and article from yesterday.

A lively breeze  was like music for the weathered schooner, inviting it to dance spritely once more before kissing a dock.

Well-seasoned athletes, these hermits in from over the wet curvature of the earth, maybe over almost everyone’s horizon.

From my vantage, they tacked all the way in;  after all, what other way is there to

return if you’ve moved on the waves and wind so long as well as added so many patches sail upgrades.

And the New York, the sixth boro he returns to has signs about an . . .  air race?!!?  Air race signs in the harbor?  That would be more than enough to befuddle someone even returning from a proverbial  three-hour tour.

And my conveyance, a 125-year-old schooner that raced on the waves at 8.4 knots,

heeling over, scudding before the wind, drinking deeply through the scuppers . . .  well, I’ll post about that tomorrow.

Meanwhile, come to Pier 66 for the party on Sunday night.

Here’s the AP story.  Here and here are posts I did on the interior of Anne three + years ago.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated but very exciting:  NYHarbor Shipping!! Check it out and leave a comment.

And more from the NYTimes: where NYC families learn to sail . . . on the sixth boro of course.

April 22 2007 . . . schooner Anne heads out for

a very long time.  Goal:  to sail without landfall for 1000 days.    I took this foto several miles outside the Narrows, one of my last of Reid, Soanya, and Anne bound for sea, and I was nervous for them.  Today . . .

Anne returns.  Capt. Mike has already seen the schooner and posted about it here.

More later.

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