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My most recent Professional Mariner published article can be read here.

Today’s post presents some outtakes and more from the article process.  When you look at the tug below, or its earlier iteration,

you might not expect it has this elevating ability.  You’ve seen it here in a winter solstice post from nine years ago.

By elevating, the view from the helm can be raised by 15′ . . .  fifteen feet!!

External egress when the wheelhouse is down doesn’t work, and looks like this.  When you elevate, don’t forget to “release the velcro flap…”.

When it’s up, this is the view down the passage.

Of course, I wanted to see the ram that moved the wheelhouse up and down, and here pointing out function is John Joseph Captain C. J. Steen.

Here’s a crew photo, with (l to r), Jonathan Stasinos, Graham Lebica, Tim Ivory, Glenn Anderson, C. J. Steen, TBS consultant Birk Thomas, and James Stasinos.

Home base, the resting place,  these days for another Stasinos tug Meaghan Marie is a pier in  Red Hook Brooklyn terminal, but 

the goal of course is to stay engaged.

All photos, info . . .  WVD, who’s looking for more green and buff.

If you haven’t read it yet, here’s my Professional Mariner article on “barging” in the area of the St. Lawrence River called the Thousand Islands. Since there’s plenty of reading there, I’ll just make this mostly a photo post.  LCM owner Jake Van Reenen took all but the last three photos in this post.

In February, the LCM and everything else “afloat” is actually ice-trapped.   Folks who live year-round on the islands travel by snow machine.

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By late March, the ice has turned to liquid, and navigation starts to resume on the Seaway. 

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It’s April and houses on the islands need a visit from the fuel truck.

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In May, folks from “away” begin to return, sometimes bringing their own supplies.

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All manner of vehicles travel to the Islands in early June, when

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I visited.  The photos below I took  . . .

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As we traveled with an empty fuel truck back to Clayton, we took the stern of

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Vikingbank, headed upbound for Duluth!! for grain.

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Captain Jake and deckhand Patsy Parker.

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Summer and early fall photos from Seaway Marine Group will follow.

If you’re interested in reading a great book on Andrew J. Higgins, the developer of these boats, try this one by Jerry E. Strahan.

For my post on another LCM cleaning up Sandy debris, click here. For my post on repurposed LSTs, one I’ll be traveling on tomorrow, click here.

Here was 1.  Part of my inspiration here is Paul’s hawsepiper blog, sorted here by the topic of bunkering.  Here’s bowsprite’s POV on this.  Another part of the choice here–other than muggy August weather–is the appearance of this story in Professional Mariner, for which I took the photos.  This post uses some of the other photos I took that cold, dark morning a half year ago.

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Behold a problem of having a dripping water hose too close to the fuel inlet.

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The crew of Capt. Log topped off quite a few tanks that morning, and

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printed out a ticket a the end of each job.

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Here’s the first post I did on Capt. Log, whose days delivering fuel as a single-skin tanker are numbered.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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