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and they skip the sixth boro….  They were in New London some years back and here too . . ., but 2017 has gone from Charleston to Bermuda, and from there to Boston, Quebec City and Halifax . . .   All these photos come compliments of Sean McQuilken…

And in order, it’s Libertad, who once long ago in 1969 called at South Street Seaport, here (and scroll) to deliver some original spars for Wavertree  ,

Oosterschelde, the 99-year-old,

Alexander von Humboldt II,  (the oldster of this set, albeit one with a major reinvention),

El Galeon, whom I first saw in San Juan, 

Spirit of South Carolina

Lynx,

Pride of Baltimore II, and

When and If, who traveled the Erie Canal a few years back to get worked on on Seneca Lake, all great ships . . .  Maybe one of these years, Wavertree and Peking will join in the fun . . . just maybe…  And Peking has its share of adventure awaiting it this summer, with loading anticipated now early in the second week of July.

But I won’t be in Boston, because this weekend is also the mermaid’s conclave . . .  and I head to the heartland and off the grid right after that . . .

Again, many thanks to Sean for these photos.

 

As I post this, Hurricane Isaac approaches New Orleans, and the work  of every mariner on the river is to ride out the storm. Even if it appears that almost nothing is moving on the river, movement is there and intense.  Click here (now) for live views on the street and on the river in the Crescent City.  To see what Isaac looked like over in Florida from Jed’s perspective, click here.

In the sixth boro, a race is a few days away, but vessels like Susan Miller--pushing the barge with the “rolled on and about to be rolled off” trailer–are at work.

Ditto an unidentified DonJon tug, Pati E. Moran, inbound CMM CMA CGM Eiffel, and schooner Pride of Baltimore II go about their business.

Having “rolled-off” said trailer truck, Susan distances herself from Mary Whalen (just the bow at the starboard stern of the cruise ship) and Queen Mary 2.

Viking moves a barge through the KVK,

as does Arabian Sea and 

Weeks’ Elizabeth, 

Dorothy J,

St. Andrews,

Gramma Lee T Moran, and

the list could go on.  Here, Doris Moran and Dace Reinauer . . .  that’s tug work too.   This last foto below comes compliments of Marian & William Hyman.  Thanks.

All other fotos taken by will Van Dorp, who will be at the race Sunday.  Thanks for reading.

Here’s  some of my May 2010 coverage of Fleet Week’s arrival.  So Fleet Week and OpSail 2012 have converged, commingling state-of-the-art with traditional vessels.   Now add  into the mix F/A-18s and Hudson river water pumped through the system of  1931 John J. Harvey.  Doubleclick enlarges fotos.

Leading the fleet is Eagle.

And leading the tall ships is J. S. de Elcano (1927).

The day was blessed with atmospheric light

…and acrobatic and disciplined sailors.

Not as common a name to our ears as Magellan, Elcano was Magellan’s second-in-command and the one who completed “Magellan’s circumnavigation” more than a year after Magellan was killed in 1521.

Vessels included destroyer USS Roosevelt (commissioned 2000),

Gazela (1901), (Get tickets to this weekend’s Gazela theater here.)

USS San Jacinto (commissioned 1988),

and Dewaruci (launched 1953, keel laid 1932).

I wondered what these crew would do if the ominous sky sent thunder and lightning.

Etoile, I believe, was there as were

La Belle Poule (1932),

and Cisne Branco  (2000) and   HCMS Iroquois (1970, 1992).

Crew rode high in the rigging of Cisne Branco.

Cuauhtemoc (commissioned 1982) passed in review with

more crew in the rigging.

Emily Miller made the parade and in the distance, it’s  USS Gonzalez (commissioned 1996).

Click here for info on the namesake for DDG-66.

Appledore 5 crosses JS Shirane (commissioned 1980).

The sailing vessel heeled over is Summerwind (1929) and approaching is James Turecamo  (1969), prepared to handle white hulls.

Pride of Baltimore II is especially significant, given that the rationale for an OpSail event this year is the bicentennial of the war of 1812.   This fact also makes significant the participation by a Canadian and a British vessel in Fleet Week.

And huge flag . . . says it’s Gloria  (commissioned 1968), passing

RFA Argus, container ship turned floating hospital.

Colombian crew –men and women–in the rigging

and on the jibbom put on a colorful show.

Guayas (commissioned 1976)

had skyscraper crew at the very top of the mast.

And finally . .  a return for USS Wasp.   Notice the tug midships port side.  Know it?

I was surprised to learned it was neither Charles D. nor Responder but Roderick (1967) !  Generally, Roderick is not a sixth boro tug.

And here’s another unusual sight, commingling the power of a McAllister and a Moran  assisting Wasp into the berth.

Parade over, Catherine heads back to the dock, as does Pioneer (commissioned 1885!!)

And a final shot for today, TWO French handiworks, Belle Poule and the Statue of Liberty.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Rake refers to mast slant from perpendicular relative to forward and aft.  Generally, a mast is raked aft of plumb, although in many seas masts are raked forward.  Raking the masts of a sailing vessel, one step of tuning a rig,  ideally serves to balance the center of effort.   The rake here on Liberty Clipper is accentuated by the “perpendicularity” of the buildings over in Jersey City.  Foto taken in October.  Serious sailors and naval architects can talk at length about rake.

Pride of Baltimore II also has seriously

raked masts.  So does Spirit of Bermuda, as seen here back in September.  As do Amistad  and Amazon.

Ditto schooner America.

On power ships, stacks are often raked, although this seems to be  about style.  To rake or not is a “first chicken or first egg” questions of ship design.  Cangarda has a single raked funnel.  Earlier steam vessels appeared to have perpendicular stacks.

Buoys, on the other hand, should not be “raked” this much and on only one side of the channel.  Something amiss here is.

Unrelated:  Some three years back bowsprite took these fotos and gave momentum to my whatzit series.  Here‘s how that “short ship” looks today, just before a radical transformation into something “tall.”

Also unrelated but getting some attention these days, tugster ran this post of Giulio Verne six plus weeks ago.  NYTimes ran this story yesterday, and adds delightful onboard info.

I’m still in Georgia, craving salt water, completing unfinished blog posts when the spirit moves me.

A sailing race a thing of beauty is.  It’s graceful, regal, with no extraneous noise.  It’s slow . .  not to a swimmer but to the speeds “dinosaur fuel” propels us.  From left to right here, I think it’s America 2.0, Intrepid, Bernice, Black Watch, and  Pride of Baltimore II.

Black Watch (?)  takes Pride of Baltimore II’s stern as they both try to read the barely visible.

The beauty of a race like this is that it’s enjoyable even from some miles away, as

each rig differs a bit from the next and progress is about unhurried urgency . . . like “slow food.”

The hulls suggest  agelessness, although they benefit from a wealth of loving, skilled maintenance.

The Pride of Baltimore II always leaves me wondering, given that NYC is the place of the 99% AND the 1%, why the sixth boro and the supporting five can’t boast of a Pride of New York floating hither and yon around the globe.  What’s wrong here?

Gantry cranes are the early 21st century’s version of Walt Whitman’s “numberless  masts.”

Pride … , of course, does have an engine . . . two Cats, in fact, and it can

make a lot of noise if she chooses with her artillery.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

If you noticed a lot of sail on the sixth boro the past few days amidst all variety of weather, then you witnessed at least part of New York Classic Week.  Below, Pride of Baltimore2 and When and If pass below the cliffs of lower Manhattan.  Foto compliments of bowsprite;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

Here When and If, Adirondack and Pride of Baltimore2 head for the Statue in the “farewell race” today.  Notice crewman setting a topsail on Pride.

Here, a view from the water, shows some of Lower Manhattan’s cliffs aka “the new palisades.”

The foto below taken yesterday just seconds after the red racing flag appeared shows America II, Black Watch (ex-Tabor Boy and ex-Edlu II), Imagine, and Adirondack.  For info on each of the vessels, click here, then navigate to NY Classic Week and then 2008 participating yachts.  Winner was Black Watch, with Adirondack, 3rd.

Also, at the start yesterday, When and If and Pride, finishing 6 and 5 respectively.  By the way, When and If was built for General Patton.

Naturally, a tug appears in these fotos . . . here a Buchanan moves a sand scow downriver as the sailing yachts prepare for the red flag signalling the race start.

 

Peculiar, thought bowsprite, for what cause does this sailing flotilla make southward?  To bring out -lemme see–Adirondack, What and If, Pride of Baltimore 2, and an unknown sloop, might there be some contest?  Might the East River squadron soon flank?   Might some exotic airship there negotiate an approach?  Spritely, then,  to the other side of her balloon’s gondola did she glance, and

–egads–what ho?  What fabulous collection of vessels does northward these waters ply?

What intrepid and classic do these smaller ones surround?

Surely, thought bowsprite, the regal lady, constant on her station on Liberty’s isle hence, will today stand down and follow this fleet to the north.

Up into the North River they all made way.  By now, bowsprite did comprehend,  an icon’s return

necessitated a quick descent earthward to retrieve her speedy steed, possibly gather reinforcements, and gallop along Hudson’s bank to see where this worthy band would make anchorage.

Of course, the intrepid vessel is–Intrepid, whose career spanned from 1943, saw suicide attacks of another generation, recovered space travelers, and now still serves as education for the future.  Anyone have fotos of CV-11 headed under the Brooklyn Bridge in 1965?

All fotos here, compliments of bowsprite.

No more sails using this jib.

All these shots were taken in a 24-hour period recently, the one above and all those below.

Four kids in this small sailboat seemed to cut dangerously close to Buchanan 12 pushing eleven gravel barges toward Haverstraw. By the way, at 3000 hp, the big Buchanan 12 generates less horsepower than the MK V (Mako’s) featured in Speed and 1 and 2 posts, not torque, just horsepower.

Lettie G. Howard sails past the Hess tanks in Edgewater, NJ. Check this link for a 1989 shot of Lettie!

Pride of Baltimore 2 with only the topsail set takes passengers toward Ellis Island. Check this in case you wonder about the 2.

Clearwater sails northward toward Tappan Zee Bridge. The festival this year coincides with the solstice in case you’re not going to Coney Island.

Mystic Whaler heads past Storm King toward West Point. Support your local sail.

I’ve not added to this series so long now that rumor is I’m becoming pariah among those who harness the wind. Sincere apologies! I’m totally with you all, just . . . uh . . . breathless?

 

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South Street’s Pioneer above and Pride of Baltimore II with unidentified escorts below. Would you believe the foto below was taken less than a quarter mile from the Battery on a supremely hazy early autumn day?

 

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A green stripe along the jib . . . might it be– could it possibly be– Green Lantern?

 

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Ventura (Herreshoff built for the founder of Citibank) heads north framed by a Trump Building (green roof) and westside pillars of the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges.

 

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Adirondack and Pride of Baltimore II, bow to bow.

 

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About my absence . . .well Aeolus has been doing to me what he’s done to others, and I’m up to what Cavafy prayed for.

Photos, WVD.

Sails . . . .and migratory birds share rhythms: following the coast in tune with seasons. New sail and birds appear after having wintered southward over the horizon.

 

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Inbound a week or so ago was Juno, launched 2003 in Massachusetts. Scroll down for info here.

 

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Arriving about the same time was When and If, built for General Patton in Maine to sail around the world “when and if” he survived the war; most of the rest is history, but he didn’t survive long the postwar long enough to circumnavigate.

 

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The vessel above is the length of Juno and When and If combined, although you’d never guess that from this foto. Knickerbocker, less than 20 years old was built—in Wisconsin!

 

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And here for a few more days is Pride of Baltimore II.

As Herman Melville says in the first chapter of The Classic,

“Circumambulate the city of a dreamy Sabbath afternoon. Go from Corlears Hook to Coenties Slip, and from thence, by Whitehall northward. What do you see? – Posted like silent sentinels all around the town, stand thousands upon thousands of mortal men fixed in ocean reveries. Some leaning against the spiles; some seated upon the pier-heads; some looking over the bulwarks of ships from China; some high aloft in the rigging, as if striving to get a still better seaward peep. But these are all landsmen; of week days pent up in lath and plaster – tied to counters, nailed to benches, clinched to desks. How then is this? Are the green fields gone? What do they here?

But look! here come more crowds, pacing straight for the water, and seemingly bound for a dive. Strange! Nothing will content them but the extremest limit of the land; loitering under the shady lee of yonder warehouses will not suffice. No.

They must get just as nigh the water as they possibly can without falling in. And there they stand – miles of them – leagues. Inlanders all, they come from lanes and alleys, streets and avenues, – north, east, south, and west. Yet here they all unite. Tell me, does the magnetic virtue of the needles of the compasses of all those ships attract them thither?”

My answer: Yup. Always did and always will.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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