You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Pioneer’ tag.

First, if you’re free today and within travel distance of Lower Manhattan, do yourself a favor and attend this event, 4 p. m., a book signing by Dr. James M. Lindgren.  His new book is a much needed complement to Peter Stanford’s A Dream of Tall Ships, reviewed here a few months ago.   Details in Preserving South Street Seaport cover almost a half century and will enthrall anyone who’s ever volunteered at, donated to, been employed by, or attended any events of South Street Seaport Museum.  Lindgren laments SSSM’s absence of institutional memory saying, “Discontinuity instead defined the Seaport’s administration.”  Amen . .  as a volunteer I wanted to know the historical context for what seemed to me to be museum administrations’ repeated squandering of  hope despite herculean efforts on the part of volunteers and staff I knew.

As my contribution to creation of memory, I offer these photos and I’d ask again for some pooling of photos about the myriad efforts of this museum over the years.

Pier 17.  April 17, 2014.  According to Lindgren, this mall opened on Sept 11, 1985 with a fireworks show.  Its demise may by this week’s end be complete.

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April 12, 2014.  Photo by Justin Zizes.

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Feb 23, 2014.

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Jan 21, 2014 . . . Lettie G. Howard returns.

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Sept 20, 2013.  This is the last photo I ever took FROM the upper balcony of Pier 17.

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Sept 12, 2013.

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July 2012.  A fire had broken out on the pier, and Shark was the first on scene responder.   Damage was minimal, despite appearances here.

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Now for some photos of vessels that have docked in the South Street area in the past half century.

July 2012 . . . Helen McAllister departs, assisted by W. O. Decker and McAllister Responder.

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June 2012.  Departure of Marion M as seen from house of W. O. Decker.  Photo by Jonathan Boulware.  The last I knew, Marion M is being restored on the Chesapeake by a former SSSM volunteer.

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Lettie G. Howard hauled out in 2009.

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2009. The Floating Hospital . .  . was never part of the SSSM collection.

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2009.  Maj. Gen. Hart aka John A. Lynch aka Harlem.

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Helen McAllister with Peking and Wavertree.   Portion of bow of Marion M along Helen‘s starboard.

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Mathilda posing with W. O. Decker in Kingston.  2009.

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Moshulu now in Philadelphia.

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2005, I believe.  Spuyten Duyvil (not a SSSM vessel) and Pioneer.

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Thanks to Justin and Jonathan for use of their photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp.  For many stories on these vessels, that mall, and so much more, pick up or download these books and read them asap.

 

 

Here was 9.

It seems that sailing just gets better as summer turns into fall.  Like Pioneer.   Click here for bookings via Water Taxi.

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America 2.0

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Shearwater

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Adirondack

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There are also those sailing vessels I’d like to see under sail.  Like Angel’s Share with its twin helms, here

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a close-up of the port helm.

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Slim Gunboat 6606

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with its Marshall Islands flag

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Heron . . . which I’ve seen as far south as Puerto Rico.

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Clipper City

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I’d love to find the time and invitations to sail on all those wind vessels.  But I actually did sail on Pioneer the other day.  Come with the vessel and crew as we leave the pier,

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ride the wind in a busy harbor for a few hours, and

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then lower sail before returning to the pier.

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All fotos taken this week by Will Van Dorp.  Time’s now for me to head out and enjoy more of this autumn air.

Looks like I got lured outa town once again.    Meanwhile . . . Discovery Coast goes on hauling out dredge spoils, and

Pioneer sails toward Red Hook.  Note Mary Whalen in the distance.

And if you’re around on Thursday, make your way to Red Hook to buy stuff–art, tools, etc–to help raise funds for Mary Whalen.  Details here on Rick Old Salt’s blog.

Both fotos by Will Van Dorp, who will try to post fotos from along the course . . . .

Boro6 aka the sixth boro or New York harbor sees diverse vessels and and floats in and out staggering amounts of cargo.  I’m thrilled by the amount of collaboration this blog can muster.  Many eyes see more things.  Like Princess Danae, captured last week by John Watson.  Princess Danae has long since departed, but John pointed out a secret.  Any ideas?

The vessel is operated today by Classic International Cruises.  For scale, compare her beside Norwegian Jewel.  The secret?  Princess Danae began life in 1955 as Port Melbourne, a tanker general cargo vessel!  (Thanks for catching that, Bart!)

A first time foto from Capt. G. Justin Zizes, Jr.   . .  . it’s Maryland.  Welcome, Justin.

I’m putting the next two fotos here because I wonder if anyone can tell me what type of barge this is . . . long and narrow, towed  on a single diagonal line by

Thomas J Brown.  This is my second time to see Brown towing this barge.

A darker story awaiting enlightening here . . . the inimitable Elizabeth Wood took this foto some five or so years back.  It’s Lettie G Howard, dormant and in bondage for many months now, and for sale;  part of the sad dissolution

and crumbling happening at the museum formerly known as South Street Seaport.  Until a new plan for the ships (See these stories by  MWA, Old Salt,  and Frogma.)   even Pioneer will remained fettered.  SOS indeed, or given the age of Lettie G and Pioneer . . . should we make that CQD?   CQD!!    The MWA link has a tribute to Bernie also.

Thanks to John, Justin, and Elizabeth for these fotos and the collaboration.  The ones of Thomas J Brown and Pioneer by Will Van Dorp.   Type any of these vessel names (except Princess Danae) and you’ll get many previous appearances.  And, doubleclick enlarges most.

The previous in the series was here.  I document the conclusion of that sail here.  After the jib gets dropped, the mate secures it on the headrig.  The link in that sentence gets you to a glossary; doubleclick enlarges fotos.  At Buck’s suggestion: music by  Richard Thompson and  Bob Neuwirth.

In preparation to lower the foresail, the boom is centered and

secured.

This crewman lowers the peak halliard as

another flakes the sail.

Once the foresail is stowed, the mainsail boom is centered and secure; it too

gets flaked as it’s lowered.

Reef nettles are tucked into the flakes to maintain clearer line-of-sight for the captain.

Forward docklines are laid out.

Crew prepares to send the first stern line.

Upon command it goes toward the bitt and

get hauled in.

Ditto the first of two bow lines, and then

they get hauled in.

Once the schooner is tight and centered on the point of egress, it’s all fast.

This trip complete . . .  I’m ready for another soon.  The sixth boro awaits.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated:  See Bonnie’s “fishtales on fryday” here.

Last fall I caught Pioneer from outboard; yesterday I rode Pioneer on its trip to welcome back schooner Anne and play with Erin Wadder.  This post is mostly intended to document the first part of that ride.  Before leaving the dock, captain and crew confer.

This seasoned crew greets passengers as they transition from terra to aqua.

After the vessel slips into the East River,  crew tidies docklines.

Crew on the halliards raise the mainsail; then

coil and hang these lines on the shrouds, to keep them from free to run, should an emergency lowering of sails need to happen.

Bow watch signals oncoming traffic.

Pioneer skitters down the Bay quite nicely for a hull that served as a sailing sand conveyance a full 125 years ago.  Imagine a 1985 Mack dumptruck racing around with paying passengers in the year 2110!!

The winds inspiring Pioneer to skitter and scud also propel these other sailing vessels yesterday,  Anne farther and an unidentified sloop nearer.  Can anyone identify the sloop?

Scuppers port and starboard get a thorough rinsing.

Reid and Anne engage in some performance artistry with Freja Fionia.

The sloop tacks past again, and Pioneer, belly

in her sails, plays along.

A followup post soon will document Pioneer‘s return to the dock.  For now, sharing the air and water with us was a crew setting out on a formidable journey as Reid concluded his.  Artemisoceanrowing intended here to leave the sixth boro for a ride across the North Atlantic all the way

to the UK.  To be followed.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  See you among the merfolk tomorrow!

Whatzit?  Here here here are some previous answers to that question, but the foto below, is it abstract art?  I’d put it in a frame and hang it in my gallery.  And the title of this post, is it

this sixth boro vessel, or

this?

Nope.  Here’s the one, but it turns out the name Pioneer in many fields is like the last name Smith in this country . . .  very common.  It’s a sexy name in art, politics, religion, science . . .   the list goes on.  The vessel below gets its name from

a foundry located on the Delaware River.  See a whole set of 1987 fotos on this vessel in its Marcus Hook birthplace starting here on page 58.  Notice the star outline?  This bow shot shows what

downrig looks like.   Also notice the flat and barge-like  lines of her hull, effective for its first role back 125 years ago as a sand sloop, yes, sloop.  Her draft is variable, 4.5′ centerboard up and 12′ with it fully down.  For a view of her deck, click here.

And here’s how she looks fully rigged, under load, and crewed.  Who IS that sprite on bow watch?  Clues here and here.

So back to this . . . .

And could the artist be the master of Pioneer?

For answers, make your way to South Street Seaport, once the season begins.  Here and here are past fotos of Pioneer under sail.

For now,  enjoy these fotos, all taken by Will Van Dorp in 2010 and 2007.

As Fuji is a source of  unity for all  and inspiration for artists, so is our Lady.  Today I’ll purloin the words of

Emma Lazarus, who wrote,  “Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,  with conquering limbs astride from land to land;  here at our sea-washed

sunset gates shall stand

A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame is the imprisoned lightning, and her name Mother of Exiles.

From her beacon-hand glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command the air-bridged

harbor that twin cities frame.  “Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp!” cries she with silent lips. . .  .”    And you probably know the rest.

A bulked-up Helen Parker plays here, and

as does this Bouchard barge No. 85.

Different photographers help her give illusions of cavorting atop dredger New York or

or wave at a random passing container ship, this one Hanjin Colombo, and so many more.

Other vessels pictured include Liberty IV, schooner Pioneer, and ferry Spirit of America.  Also, in the second foto, notice the club/barge William Wall between the sailboats and Ellis Island.

Fotos #1–8 credit to Dan B.  #9 is Jed’s, and the last one is Will Van Dorp.  Dan B contributed the shots of Flinterduin, and Jed contributes regularly, recently with this rare puzzler shot.

As I look at these two days of shots, in response to the survey about whether NYC’s sixth boro needs a seasonal light display, it occurs to me that some shots are missing, like Liberté as seen from outside the Narrows, atop the gantries at Bayonne and Port Elizabeth, from an aircraft above 1000′, and from the peak of a tall building in Newark.  Anyone help?

Parting shot:  one of my own favorites.

And for an artistic influence on Bartholdi, see a painting called La Vérité by Jules J. Lefebvre completed before Liberté, click here.

Yesterday afternoon along the Arthur Kill, I communed with this creature, which I thought erroneously an osprey.  Peregrine?  Some type of hawk?  I was amazed that while tearing apart its rare-rat lunch (I declined a portion), it allowed me within 10 feet!  More fotos of the encounter at the bottom of this post.  I knew I would post some fotos, but in considering a context, it occurred that the sixth boro (and beyond waters) is ideal  bird-look space.

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Here an egret or heron steals across a dawn shot.

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While Cyprine was easing in, a gull streaked across a foto.

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A wonderfully-titled work in Pamela Talese exhibit is “Je n’egret rien.” Check out her show before October 30!  Pamela’s caption reads, “The ITB (Integrated Tug & Barge) Jacksonville came into the Navy Yard pretty beat up. As I was painting, I noticed a white egret splashing around in the waters of Dry Dock 5—wildlife among industry!”  Coexistence!  Check out these birds-in-the-meadowlands tugster fotos here.

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As bulker Oxygen came in yesterday, a gull escorted it.  Oxygen referred to here is about six months new, headed for Port Newark although I don’t know what cargo.

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Here’s a first for tugster:  Bowsprite‘s art migrated electronically from her site to mine, and it shows self-help-oriented Laridae.  Related to birds, recall my suggestion in September that Bowsprite can fly.

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Pioneer travels with its very own familiar.

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“A swarm of starlings so darkened the skies one July day at precisely 1:33 pm that sunbathers left the beach…”  Sounds like a good opener for a sci-fi tale.

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But back to my hawk.  At one point when I closed within 10 feet, it picked up its lunch with its left talon, and hobbled back.  Another bird might use its beak for that.  I took that as a indication of its self-confidence.

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Long beautiful legs.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Here’s an older birds-post.  A Moveable Bridge has tracked some geese, and if you check in at Reid’s on 1000daysatsea Day 914, you’ll see he’s begun communing with a heron.

Lord Byron’s poem “She walks in Beauty” might eventually be parodied  rather updated in this post.  If you’ll click on this link, you’ll get the entire poem AND a Botticelli Venus.  I admit I had a long discussion with Botticelli about this work while he was creating it:  have her turn around, I pleaded.  Oh well.  I long ago gave up trying to argue with Sandro’s about anything.   Meanwhile, seeing how bows got us to Dolly Parton, who knows how an examination of sterns might lead, how it could descend . . . or rise.

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The name’s the thing sometimes like here or

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here:  behold ex-Jaguar.

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Sure, it’s  fuel barge bow but a survey stern.

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Look upon ex-Exxon Empire State.  Why is Responder on recycling duty so much?

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uh . . . ?  Anyone help?  [Thanks to Jeff and James:  Psara meaning “of fish.”]

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Check out Doris Moran and Cable Queen.  Anyone know the Cable Queen story?

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Catch a glimpse of Ruth M. Reinauer, class of 2009.

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Drool over John J. Harvey.  By the way, to learn more about this legendary fireboat, come hear author Jessica DuLong read at Atlantic Gallery on October 21, or read her book My River Chronicles.  I immensely enjoyed it.

aaaafs10Relish the lines on what for 40ish years has been the sixth boro’s very own mostly stay-at-home some of the time flat-bottom, Pioneer.

aaaafs11Marvel at Maryland, as she wonders about this island.  Yeah, and wanders about it, too.

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Oh . . . posteriors.  Send in your favorite.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

By the way, Patricia Ann bounced me around quite a bit, I hung on, but I haven’t seen her since.

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