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Take a fishing trawler built in 1928 and converted to a minesweeper some 10 years later.  After the war, convert it into a North Sea freighter, which then crosses the Atlantic to Kingston NY, where the photo below was taken.  To digress, I recognize Matilda (click and scroll)  on the hard behind the freighter but have no information of the two tugs to the right.  The photo below comes thanks to Nobby Peers, who worked on the old freighter in the mid-1990s, and it changed the course of his life.


So you might wonder about the connection of the freighter to this barque in Vanuatu?   The next four photos come thanks to Mike Weiss.


Here’s the same barque at sea.


Ditto, the barque seen here of Mangareva in French Polynesia.


And the answer is . . . they are all the same hull!


And finally, here are three photos I took when Picton Castle was in the Hudson in May 2012.  Tomorrow morning she sails out of Lunenburg NS for a five-month voyage. 


She’s registered in the Cook Islands. 




Many thanks to Nobby and Mike for use of these photos.   Fair winds . . . Picton Castle.

And here, verbatim again, is my call for collaboration for November posts.  Thanks to those of you who have already responded.

“…I invite your help for November posts.  All month long I hope to feature different ports–harbors–waterways and their workboats, which means not only towing vessels, but also ferries, fish boats, maintenance vessels, even yachts with professional crews.  I’ve been traveling a lot the past few months and have a fairly large backlog of boats from ports–harbors–waterways mostly in New England.  But as a social medium, this blog thrives on collaboration, so no matter which waters are near you,  I’m inviting you to send along photos of workboats from ports I might not get to.  I’d need at least three interesting photos to warrant a focus on a port.  Here are examples I’ve already done that illustrate what I’m thinking to do.”

Outbound at 0800 this morning, Swan took a turn past the Statue before leaving.  Foto by John Watson, who is himself outbound for a while.

Out of luck I was in guessing the timing, so I got this view as Swan was outbound for the port of Luba, I’m told.   Luba is on the island now known as Bioko, which

I once knew as Fernando Po, a rare place in Africa where Spanish is the official language.    I hope the Atlantic Salvor folks got some good fotos of Swan headed out.

Yacht Justice (1930) is an outstanding survivor.

I’ve know idea what this trio of military/interdiction go-fast boats are, bt they are turly out-of-the-ordinary.

Also, out-of-the-ordinary for the sixth boro is Dewaruci, in port early for OpSail, arriving here on Wednesday.  Dewa Ruci appears to be a character in a wayang puppet story.  I’m looking forward to their marching band.   Over near the Red Hook side, that’s Pioneer.

And this is the start of leg 2 of the Atlantic Cup race, outbound for Newport this morning.

Over a dozen teams have entered boats.

Possible leader, pending resolution of a protest)  at the end of leg 1 (of 3) is this boat.

Oh yes . . . out of focus!   !@#@!!   And I loved the composition.

And finally . . . these folks are really outbound to a place even less known . . . maybe than Luba.

I love the hammock and banana bunch here.  For some fotos of Avatiu, click here.  For really outstanding fotos from there, click this one.

Picton Castle stack logo is quite outlandish.

First foto by outbound John Watson.  all others by Will Van Dorp.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.


November 2015
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