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My library for the time period  January 1, 2012 until today contains 11,244 fotos.  Starting from tomorrow, any 2012 fotos will be taken along the road.  So I decided to choose ONE foto per month, quite subjectively and without regard for this foto having previously been featured here.  I don’t claim these are the best of the month. Only 12 fotos, one per month.

January, Sandmaster . . .  waiting to refuel.  Today, Dec 22 . . .  Sandmaster was out there doing what it usually does, mining sand.

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February . . . Eagle Beaumont escorted in the Arthur Kill by Charles D. McAllister.

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March . . . side by side, CSAV Suape and bulker Honesty, Pacific bound through the Miraflores locks, demonstrating graphically what panamax means.

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April . . . red-trimmed Taurus west bound on the KVK, cutting past Advance Victoria.  And just today, I saw Taurus, now blue-trimmed, heading north between Manhattan and Jersey City.

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Choosing just one foto per month is tough, but for May, here’s Swan packed and almost ready to go hulldown toward Africa with these specimens of the Crowley, Reinauer, and Allied fleets.

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June . . . Weeks Shelby tows shuttle Enterprise from JFK toward Manhattan.

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July and an unforgettable 4th using Pegasus as subject under the rocket’s glare

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August . . . and coal-fired Badger heads into the sunset . . . and Wisconsin.

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September, and a parade of vessels including Urger and Buffalo leave the Federal Lock bound for Waterford.   My inimitable platform here is Fred’s Tug44.

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At the start of the Great Chesapeake Schooner race, crew is setting sail on the unique tugantine Norfolk Rebel.  In the distance, it’s Pride of Baltimore 2.

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Coming into the home stretch from Montreal, it’s Atlantic Salvor delivering segments of the WTC1 antenna.

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And December . . .  it’s Stena Primorsk looming over the USCG vessels.   At this time, Stena Primorsk was impatient to load that first hold with “north dakota crude,” only to experience the malfunction that has left her temporarily disabled upriver, its outer hull gashed open.

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Tomorrow I hit the road . . . gallivanting and visiting season.  I thank all of you for reading, many of you for helping me get these fotos, lots of you for correcting my errors and supplying missing info. Happy New Year and let’s pray for much-needed Peace on Earth . . . .

Any guesses on the identification of vessel/structure X above?  I assumed it was military.  Answer follows.

The long frustrating lines at the gas pumps locally are NOT the result of absence of fuel in the port.  From l to r here are tankers Queen Express, Romo Maersk, Sira, and Mercini Lady . . .

Closer up of Romo Maersk and Sira.  Although these tanker are in port, they’re not at the usual docks because

this activity is in high gear there:  hydrographic surveying for hidden obstacles and possibly

retrieving them.   Tug here is Harry McNeal.

Oil is being moved, however, in the likes of barge Edwin A. Poling, pushed by Kimberly Poling,  and

barge Pacific, pushed by North Sea and assisted here by tug Pegasus. Clipper Legacy is obscured at the dock there also.

Here it is . .  vessel/structure X aka Happy Delta bringing in some large structures marked

NYC Sanitation.   ?

It’s great to get this angle of Pati R. Moran, but noteworthy also . .  the orange vessel in the background . . . it’s Duncan Island, bringing NYC its bananas.

Western Highway . . . transports who knows what vehicles

And surely some parts of the port are flowing when APL Cyprine ingresses as Hoechst Express egresses.

Note the tan colored vehicles atop  . . .  port side.  Charles D. McAllister escorts.

JLTVs mebbe?  Among other things  . . .

And the two final images thanks to AIS marinetraffic . . . .  the inflow Monday morning at 0800 . . . and

today, Tuesday, at 1400.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who is mindful that many folks on land around the sixth boro still lack electricity, heat, and cable communications; and walk up and down dark stairs in high rises to get MREs passed out by the National Guard.    Temperatures this morning here were in the mid-30s . . . i.e., just a hover above freezing.

Foto by Hugh McCallion.  Pier 25 Manhatan.  Three hours til high tide and not much pier left for Pegasus and Harvey to rise.

Also pre-high tide on Rockaway, and water washing sand over the boardwalk onto Shore Front Parkway, finally justifying the name “sandy.”

Thanks to Hugh, Pam, and Barbara for the fotos.

Prayers for safety for all.

This is the 98th installment of this title.  If you’ve any ideas about what I might do with the 100th, let me know.  Of course, I could just let it pass by . . . randomly.

All these boats have some things in common, like  . ..  they passed through the sixth boro although in all types of weather/light in the past week or so.  I’l let you know what I’m thinking at the end of the post.

Miss Yvette, 1975 built in Houma, Louisiana (LA), here attending to Kraken.

Freddie K Miller, 1966 . . . Madisonville LA.

John P Brown 2002 Morgan City LA

Atlantic Salvor 1976  New Orleans.

James Turecamo 1969, Waterford NY.

Pegasus 2006  Tres Palacios TX

Pathfinder  1972 Houma LA

C. Angelo 1999 Lockport LA

Margaret Moran December 1979 Morgan City LA

Miriam Moran November 1979 Morgan City LA

And another thing they all have in common right now is that

they all work in trades other than directly pushing oil.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’d love to hear ideas about the “Random Tugs 100″ post.

Unrelated:  I read this line yesterday about a withdrawn lawsuit between the NY Port Authority and a Canadian steel company:  “The deal means the lawsuit will be dropped and the steel for the [World Trade Center] tower antenna can set sail before Canadian shipping channels freeze over in winter.”  Here’s the rest of the article.  But it made me wonder . . .  by what vessel . . . barge or ship . . . will this steel arrive in the Upper Bay.  Anyone know?  Here’s info on the fabricator of the antenna.

And a Q . . . has anyone seen evidence of construction of the crane(s) to be involved in the Bayonne Bridge raising?  I’ve heard rumors, but not read or heard anything authoritative.

The glimpse I caught while crossing westbound on the Verrazano Bridge told me to head for Fort Wadsworth:  fog with defined geographical boundaries lay at least 175′ deep over the waters’ surface at the Narrows.  Once standing on the overlook at the fort, the stacks of  two vessels (l to r) Stuttgart Express and Celebrity Summit seemed not unlike the sails of two submarines, sub-fogs in this case.

Celebrity Summit was crawling forward bellowing like a lost bovine and

as it sank deeper, left a distinct wake.

When I say geographical boundaries, I mean dynamic ones, and they expanded upward as I watched.

Keeping watch over this shifting masses with me were the previously mentioned ‘scapegoats, the ones minding the grassroots, poison ivy roots,  . . . any sorts of roots on the slopes near the Fort.

After convincing the watchers that I was no more interested in their political predictions as in anyone else’s,  the spokesgoat suggested I follow Celebrity Summit‘s path to the stable, as he phrased it.

And this seemed as good a location as available.  Ongoing bellowings from the vessel confirmed my choice.

Celebrity Summit moves stern first into BCLCT.

The rising sun began to cut through the fog and project a golden sheen onto the low clouds lying on the waters of the Upper Bay.

Pegasus (last seen here last week) makes for the North River . . . taking the Celebrity Summit‘s bow.   Here’s a foto of Celebrity Summit sans fog and post-Irene.

Guiding Summit through much of her voyage through the fog is Laura K. Moran (I believe).

All fotos yesterday by Will Van Dorp.

I thought I’d used this title before, but I was thinking about this one, backgrounds.  The idea here is similar.

From this angle, can you identify this vessel?

It’s a shipshape Pegasus!

From the same perspective, Justine McAllister and Franklin Reinauer leaving the KVK for the AK.

Ditto equally shipshape Mary Turecamo, from a perspective such that the visor practically obscures the house windows.

What’s the tale of three wakes . . . one recent and the others less so?

This is a good view of how a model bow fits snugly in the notch.

Where’s this and what’s this?  Although it looks like a building being overrun by tropical flora and fauna,

this might generate a different set of associations.

This was taken from the same  vantage point but with the camera pointed a bit higher yet, and it makes all the difference.

It’s OSC Vision entering the Upper Bay last weekend, giving new meaning to the term “shipshape.”  And the fauna here could be called landscaping goats . . . . or “scapegoats,” for short.

Two ships . . .  well, at least until you examine the farther one more closely.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who did this earlier goat homage here.

Of course, every day is water day in the sixth boro of the city of NY, and it’s great that MWA and other sponsors have chosen for five years now to recognize that fact . . . on a big “get out on the water” day . . . because who OWNS the port . . . ultimately WE do, you and I, as citizens of this country.  Many organizations manage it, enforce regulations in it, and fund educational activities about it . . . but WE own it, the port, the water . . .  and support it with our taxes and our votes.

Enjoy this set of twelve fotos taken over roughly a 12-hour period yesterday.   At daybreak, Pegasus and Urger were still rafted up on Pier 25.  This foto shows two boats whose combined longevity adds up to over 215 years!!

Resolute was northbound over by the Murchison-designed Hoboken terminal . . . which means a larger vessel needing assistance MAY shortly be headed for sea.  Here’s another Murchison-designed mass transit building in what today seems an unlikely location.

North River itself works tirelessly as part of the effort to keep sixth boro waters clean.

Urger poses in front the the Statue.  Lady Liberty was a mere 18-year-old when Urger (then C. J. Doornbos) first splashed into the waters of a Lake Michigan bay.

Launch 5 races downriver.

Indy 7 shuttles folk around as Soummam 937,  the first Algerian warship ever to visit the sixth boro leaves for sea.

Little Lady II and a sailboat negotiate passage.

Laura K and Margaret Moran escort in container vessel Arsos (check its recent itinerary at the bottom of that linked page) and weave their way to the Red Hook container port through a gauntlet of smaller vessels, including Manhattan.

Catherine C. Miller moves a small equipment barge back to base.

Fire Fighter II hurries north on the Buttermilk Channel to respond to an alarm.

A flotilla (or bobbering or paddling or badelynge) of kayaks crosses the Buttermilk.

Pioneer tacks toward the north tip of Governors Island, leaving Castle William to starboard.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp on Bastille-sur-l’eau Day.

Related:  I was overjoyed to read the NYTimes this morning and find this article about a vessel calling at Port Newark!!  Bravo.  Back a little over a week ago I was miffed about this article . . . about the port in Trondheim, which could just as well have been written about skilled workers anywhere in the sixth boro.

Also, I’m passing along a request from the Urger crew:  if anyone sees a foto of Urger crew in any local print publications, please tell me so that I can look for a clipping to pass along to them.  Thanks much . . . .

Unrelated:  From today’s NYTimes Book Review section, an essay by Douglas Brinkley and Johnny Depp on Woodie Guthrie, who would have turned 100 yesterday.

By the way, from Mitch’s Newtown Pentacle, can anyone identify the tug in this post?  I can’t .

On July 3, 1776, John Adams wrote this to his wife Abigail:  “The day will be most memorable in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival…It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade…bonfires and illuminations (fireworks) from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forevermore.”

I wonder if Abigail believed him.

Last night around 1900 hr, Brendan Turecamo (above) and Catherine Turecamo pushed their Macy’s loads upriver.  I think two other Macy’s barges  were pushed by Kimberly Turecamo and Jennifer Turecamo.

If I didn’t know better, I’d think that the Macy’s 34th Street megastore had embarked on short sea shipping of goods.   Do you know that as a teenager, R. H. Macy  worked on a Nantucket whaling ship, Emily Morgan, during which time he got a tattoo, which is the star that still today in the company logo.

A motley crew of spectators ventured into the river for the show,

a very motley crew indeed.

Other tugs took some time off as well . . . Maurania III here, and Quantico Creek and the other Pegasus over on the other side of the river.  Maybe others too.

The two Harley tugsHMS Liberty and St Andrews–hung out with 1907-built Pegasus at the sanitation pier.

It appears here that a contingent of the  NYC Air Force is escorting in Hornblower Infinity.  As it said, it APPEARS that way.    Anyone I know working there?

343 summons the safety spirits.

Lots of spectators wait on a contingent of NYC’s passenger/dinnerboat fleet.

Darkness falls. Tension builds as thunderstorms do their own illumination to the north and the south.

Around 2130 h . . . opening salvo.

These fotos do not capture that percussive blasts and echoes off the sanitation pier . . . so use your imagination.

Too bad John and Abigail and all the other signers weren’t here.

Well, maybe they were.

I did hear some creaking and squeaking on the pier.

Happy

Independence

all the time.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

AND Pegasus and you have something else to celebrate.  Remember the Partners in Preservation voting lots of you all did back in May?  Pegasus and Lehigh Valley 79 ended in 14th place, and I thought that meant they got no money.  Au contraire, they DID get a hefty sum . ..  $140,000 to split!   . . .to be used for preservation, and on a 1907-built vessel, there’s a lot of preservation to be done.  So thanks much for voting.  If you want to see Pegasus close-up, come down to Pier 25 west side of Manhattan . . .

Once these were wooden barges, which

were towed around the harbor with a wide range of cargoes.  In the foreground … disintegrating … is one a tug that once could have done the towing, now unidentifiable and impotent.

The sixth boro has many such tugs and barges, although given the efficient advance of decrepitude, fewer each season.

Once there was even a sixth boro barge called Periwinkle, no doubt painted in that color, a popular nightspot.

Here’s another barge called Driftwood, whose paint scheme and additional storage transformed a coffee (or whatever else commodity)  transporter into an off-off-Broadway-even-off-the-island entertainment palace.  Only stories remain and can be told by David Sharps, who

created the Waterfront Museum out of a wooden barge he literally dug and pumped out of the Hudson River mud, saving it from the fate of those barges above.    The two fotos above come courtesy of David Sharps.   Now the barge, the 1914 Lehigh Valley 79 tours with 1907 tug Pegasus, and other

vessels like the 1901 Urger, featured in many posts on this blog, help us visualize what those ruins in the top fotos once looked like and serve as places of entertainment even today.   Here’s one set of fotos of Urger high, dry, but cold.

Anyhow, with five minutes of your time, you can help  LV-79 and Pegasus collect a $250,000 grant for ongoing repairs.  Just click here–AND each day until May 21 on the icon upper left side of this blog to vote.  Partners in Preservation has chosen to award $$ by grant applicants demonstrated ability to use social media.  So please vote . . . and ask a handful of your friends to do so as well . . . .

Unless otherwise attributed, all fotos by Will Van Dorp.

This isn’t the first tugster post with a single foto . . .  and I’m not going to research among the 1762 previous posts how many more there’ve been.

Here and here are two previous figureheads posts,  and come later this month, I expect another such post.  Here’s a first image that would NEVER pass muster as a figurehead concept.

And here’s a question . . . can you identify the vessel that follows wherever this sea bull leads?

That’s it.  Answer identifying the figurehead may be tomorrow.

Don’t forget to make your daily “partners in preservation” vote.  Click on the image of the “rapid-aging-software-altered foto of tugster below, register, scroll thru to find “Tug Pegasus and Waterfront Museum Barge,”  and vote once a day through May 21.  Ask your friends to vote too.

And this software says this is what I’ll look like in 10 years!!!!  yikes.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

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