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I’ve seen blue, orange, and whiteGreen is the only remaining Seatrade specialized reefer I’ve yet to photograph.  The other day I caught Seatrade Red outbound.

Jonathan C. accompanied her out to retrieve the pilot.

Seatrade was established in 1951, and chose to focus on small reefer vessels.  The fleet is comprised of about 50 vessels, but there are only five in the “colour” class of reefer container carriers.

Jonathan C. accompanied her out to retrieve the pilot, and then spun around

for the next job.  I count six people in the photo above.

Seatrade Green just left Tauranga NZ with an ETA at the Panama Canal westside for March 11, so at some point in late March the Green could be back in the sixth boro.

All photos, WVD. And below, from March 2012, is a photo of another type of Seatrade reefer, Buzzard Bay.

Barrington Island, which used to be a regular in the sixth boro, is also part of their fleet.

 

After the US and Canadian newbuild orders, ACP began an order of Z-tech 6000s from China, Cheoy Lee and Hin Lee Shipyards.  The first three to arrive in Panama were Veraguas 1, Bocas del Toro, and Darién. Compared with the Canadian boats, these were shorter, wider, and more powerful.  Compared with other Z-Tech 6000s, they had low wheelhouse,  for work around ships’ flares, and two independent forward winches.  They traveled from China to Panama on their own bottoms, with a fuel stop in Honolulu.

At 89.8′ x 38.2, Veraguas I is rated at 61 tons bollard pull, generated by two Wärtsilä 9L20 engines (4826 hp total) propelling stern z-drives, i.e., ASD (azimuth stern drive).

Here she assists Grand Mercury bound for Pedro Miguel locks right after it transits the Culebra Cut.

Virtually identical to Veraguas I are the next two tugs, also Cheoy Lee and Hin Lee built;  below Panama XIV –escorted herself by three pelicans–maneuvers in Miraflores Lake.  All three tugs date from 2007 through 2008.

And here, Ocean Beauty begins a transit for the Atlantic.  Notice here centering in the lock is provided by tugboat Chiriqui III as well as the locomotives.  The new locks–that’s Cocolí atop the distant hill–utilize tugboats only, no locomotives.

 

Also, in the distance, the two white vehicles are on the road that borders the new “third set” of locks.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is still looking for photos of helm seats, captain’s chairs.  I’d like to do a post on them.  I’m looking for the full range:   luxurious to decrepit or basic.  Email me a photo of the chair and identify the vessel. You don’t need to be sitting in it.  I’ve got photos of three seats so far, but I’d like a half dozen before doing a post.

Can you identify this general area?    I just arrived here, but all last night I was dreaming about the Canal.  Should medical attention be sought?

Some quick final shots:  Fortunato.

Stellanova here and

at the lighthouse below Miraflores.

Atlantico,

American Patriot, 

Buzzard Bay escorted by

Panama XIV, 

and with this type of cargo . . .

it’s National Geographic’s Sea Lion.

A final observation:  Panama was dusty, generated by all the urgent excavation, blasting, and construction.  I felt an excitement.  Dozens of large trucks like this tranported rearranged earth along the ridge between the old and new canals at Miraflores . . . day and night.  Notice the spotlights.  I’m guessing a return trip in a few years to see the results is a must.

And if Panama seemed dusty, this place–and maybe it was the window or the mix of clouds . . . this place seemed oily.

More to come.

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