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..plus one year, that is, not quite.  A year ago, work to ready the vessel for a mid-May splash reached frenzied levels, but the Adriaen aka Aerjan Block replica made an early June appointment to be part of River Day.  Here Onrust follows Half Moon in the direction of Tappan Zee Bridge, distant background.

Here she dangled, late May 2009, minutes before splash, and

here she shivers, nine months later, February 2010, in an Albany shipyard awaiting warmer weather.

Here was two days post-splash, just above Lock 9, and

… February 2010, Albany shipyard.

Here, in suspension  . . . merest seconds before the first ever splash, and

… February 2010, Albany.

And some 70 miles south of Albany . . . Half Moon waits in a protected area for all the ice to clear out.   I wonder if the ghost of Henry migrates south to this bend in the river to find solace in the dark months . . .

and if so . . . what are his dreams, his obsessions . . .   And if that’s true, whose ghost inhabits the replica of Onrust?

Plans for Onrust for this coming season include completing the interior and doing other finishings that’ll allow further voyages, maybe in time . . . retracing the travels of Captain Block.  After four voyages to North America, Block never returned;  he continued to sail but into the cold regions north of Scandanavia once explored by Hudson.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

In less than half day from this writing, March will arrive.  Since I hope for t-shirt mildness by end of March, I’m counting on the month to arrive  . . . like a large feline:  lion plus whatever synergy comes from compounding with year of the Tiger.  (For the record, the tiger portion of that synergy frightens me most.)  As peace offering then, I dedicate this post to the large felines.  The foto of Sea Lion below comes from 2006;  I haven’t seen this 1980 tug in a while.  Anyone explain?

Feline connection with Half Moon?  Some of the hawses, like these two, are

framed by red felines . ..  line lions, I suppose?

Atlantic Leo

Onrust has as figurehead a growling lion today, but this foto from a year ago shows the about-to-hatch beast pre-blond, actually natural wood tones.  More Onrust soon.

Growler . ..  that could be a lion reference.

Eagle Boston, escorted by McAllister Responder, shows registry as Singapore, from the Malay Singapura meaning “Lion City,”   although the namesake was probably a tiger, not a lion at all.  So we should call that nation Tigrapura?

From the platbodem armada headed north on the Hudson last summer, farther is Danish Naval Frigate Thetis, but nearer sailing vessel is Pieternel, registered in the Dutch town of Beneden-Leeuwen (Lower Lion).

Notice the claws hanging from the bow of tanker Puma.

And thanks to my poor eyesight, it’s easy to see the lettering on the Evergreen vessel forward here of Tasman Sea as Ever Feline.  Can’t you make it out?  Squint a bit and it’s skewed as daylight . ..  Ever Feline, also registered in Tigrapura.

All fotos by will Van Dorp, who’s hoping for t-shirt weather and a dip off Coney Island in exactly 31 days.  Anyone care to join in . . .  a Patty Nolan bikini?

is actually a euphemism for “catching up,” which is all that’s on my plate today.  Like a month ago, I intended to put up a link to a west coast tugboat blog.  So here it is:  fremonttugboat.

Otherwise, this post comes from scrolling back through fotos I’ve taken (and not used, I think) since late spring 2009.  Try it yourself:  Put up your number of images (your fotos, else’s, your drawings, else’s) and comment on their place in your life.  Go back your chosen length of time, et voila, you have your very own retrospective!

Communication:  nothing fancy here as the deck keeps eye on work and skipper while the skipper pokes head out the window to see and hear.  Makes for clear communication, without which we in any endeavor  face peril.

aaarb3Community:  it takes a strong bond between several rivertowns and watersheds to build a boat.  If I squint, I see this motely corps of volunteers literally carrying Onrust to the water on their shoulders.    Ok, I squint hard.

aaarb4Comraderie:  Harold and a thousand other folks have acted as comrades in my life, and I am grateful to you all.  Gracias y merci buckets!

aaarb5Contentment:  or “peace” if you will.  What matters it that this man is sitting where he finds it;  it matters not that he’s across from a huge oil depot and a dredged waterway allowing ingress and egress for dozens of billions of dollars or ducats of goods each year.  Here he is content.  Like someone I know who spent weeks living beside refinery and tolerating it by imagining the hiss and roar emanated from a pristine jungle waterfall.

aaarb7Charm:  the Hudson River Valley happens to be a place of profound beauty and it mesmerizes me.  But the eye of the beholder generates a portion of that charm.  Open eyes will find it anywhere and in everything.  A resident of this Valley published THAT BOOK on this date in 1851 . Know which one?  Answer at end.

aaarb6Curiosity:  the sixth boro is a complex place geographically, historically, … you or I could continue this list.  Here, like anywhere, it seems the more you notice, the less time remains to wonder about all the new things.  What is this cove called over just north of Fresh Kills?  Writing on vessels from foreground to back say RTC1, Crow, Relentless, and Cedar Marina.  Does a road lead here?

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More curiosity:  What is this vessel that traversed to the north in front of Bowsprite’s cliff this summer?  What cargo did it transport?  What time warp did it emerge from?

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Craziness: since writing about faces as prompted by the Robert brothers tome, I’ve had a blast with this.  This one . . . an orange boar (not bore) with tusks in place of dolly partons.  May some craziness–and a sense of humor about it– be evident everywhere.

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Constancy:  1965  Near the St. Lawrence Seaway my father took this foto of a 13-year-old who became tugster.  I was already out tracking down info for the yet-to-be blog back then, way before blogs, digital cameras, computers of the wonders we know.  Some stuff doesn’t change.  Shouldn’t disappear.

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It’s unrealistic to stop after a half dozen fotos, but . . . discipline is imposed.

My last post fer a while . . .gone fishing for something.  See you in a few with new tales.  Sindbad calls us to muster.   I tried unsuccessfully to find a Gordon Bok video-version of this, but this and this . . . a nice  innocent feel too.

All fotos, except the ones by bowsprite and my father, by Will Van Dorp.

Moby Dick. Thanks, Herman.  And apropos of nothing in particular except nature, see this video.

My sentiments of more than two years ago amuse me here, and “full frontal” isn’t even really.  So in connection with a project I’m considering, here’s really  fully frontally.  Let’s start with HNLMS Tromp.  Now in those twin radomes, I see teddy bear’s ears.

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BNS Lobelia is harder to read.

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Of all the vessels in the Standing NATO Mine Countermeasures Group 1 (SNMCMG1), the most unusual was HNoMS Rauma.  Ever-reliable Jed sends these links here and here on vessel and hull design  Although Rauma traversed the Atlantic with the rest of the group, she seems marginally seaworthy.  But what do I know?    For all the SNMCMG1 vessels, visit Bowsprite.

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Peacemaker .  . spider be-webbed?

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Crow, (1963, Brooklyn, NY!) as seen at the bulkhead in Waterford last Saturday.

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Evening Mist, (1976, Houma, LA), big square house.

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Gulf Service, 1979, Amelia, LA) taller, hourglass houses.

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And this circles us back to Tromp, here following the egg-shaped Onrust, (2009, Rotterdam Junction, NY), featured many times on this blog.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who leaves soon for Kingston for . . .

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“Kingston Waterfront on the weekend of September 19-20. From noon to 6 p.m. both days, the WOW (Working on Water) event includes a tugboat bootcamp, trolley rides, lighthouse tours, sea shanty singers and more including “wandering tug geezers” and a “Working Hudson Picture Show.” The event is funded by the Ulster County Quadricentennial Commission, NYS assemblymember Kevin Cahill, the City of Kingston Quadricentennial Committee, and the Historic Kingston Waterfront Revival (Robert Iannucci and Sonia Ewers). For more information, check out the website here [www.workingonwater.org]. Meanwhile, from noon to 7 p.m. on September 19 at Cornell Park, which is located on Wurts Street, there’s a free outdoor drum music festival. Jack Dejohnette, the famed jazz drummer who played with jazz greats such as Miles Davis, and Jerry Marotta, who has played with Peter Gabriel and the Indigo Girls, among others, are scheduled to perform”  as quoted from   the http://www.ci.kingston.ny.us/

“Working Hudson Picture Show . .. ”  OOps!  That’s me.  Gotta run.  I’ll be at the Picture Show collecting ghost stories.  If you got one, tell it to my video camera, please?

So here is most of the rest of the fleet.  Of course, Half Moon was the flagship, the raison d’etre of the event.  Following behind is Onrust, its first season teaching history.  Use the search window to find more on both.  For a creative-nonfiction account of Henry Hudson’s journey channeled across 400 years, click here.

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Tjalk Hoop en Vertrouwen (Hope and Trust, Confidence) dates from 1913!

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Check out the four rows of reef points in the sail!

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Lemsteraak LE89 dates from 2005. Partly obscured is Windroos, the hoogaars from 1925.

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Check out the crew shirts that read “Touch of Dutch.”

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Ommeswaaij is a Lemsteraak from 1995.

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First in this pack is the tjalk De Tijd zal t Leeren (Time Will Learn It), dating from 1912.

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All in all it was a lovely parade.  Standing on Pier 84 I was moved to tears, especially during the gun salute as I heard background chatter mostly in my mother tongue.  Given all the preparation that went into these festivities, I have a complaint:  the outermost portion of that pier has been incomplete for some time.  Almost finished but NOT.  That outer portion would also have been the best platform for fotos, which a lot of people recognized to be true.  Since no signs prohibited access, a few dozen folks stepped over the fence and started snapping fotos and cheering friends and relatives–yes, relatives–on the boats.  Until various authorities arrived, threatening $100 fines.  It troubled me to hear threats used against tourists who might have marginal control of English.

My question is . . . why is this decking work not complete in time to be used for such high-profile events as this.  After all, less than 300 feet away were the Mayor, the US Secretary of State, and the Crown Prince and Princess of the Netherlands?

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And when a certain boat blocked these fotografers, some of them were unhappy, especially that tall guy, arms akimbo.

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And what view was this certain boat blocking . . . you ask?  Check this out!!  And please finish the pier decking!  I’ll even volunteer to help with the installation.

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I have a request:  certain folks would like the opportunity to photograph and sketch these classic and exotic boats in all their lush detail.  There is a viewing scheduled on Governors Island on Sunday, but the time is short.  Also, might there be a back-up time if –say–it rains?  For specifics on each of the Dutch boats, click here.

Arms akimbo-guy . . . oh, that’s tugster.

All fotos except the last two by Will Van Dorp.  The last two come from Bernard Ente.  Thank you!

X . . . no xebecs sail the sixth boro, and my 2100-page dictionary has only 2 and a quarter pages devoted to words starting with “x.”  Yet, when X lives  in a word, it intensifies.  Consider the difference between the mundane “tacks” and the pulse-quickening “tax.”   I’ll get back to this deck barge in a moment.

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From math we learn that X is the unknown.  Of all the steel beyond the eastbound tug Norwegian Sea, backlighting “x’s” out all the details except silhouette.  From AIS, I know the ships are tankers Tanja Jacob and Kinaros (member of the elite AMVER group), and beyond them MS Explorer of the Seas.

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X . . . experimental, except Twin Tube is not a sailing prototype; rather, it’s half of the Reynolds lightering fleet.

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Dutch replica vessels like Onrust and Half Moon often sport XXX somewhere, which some attribute to the laissez-faire of Amsterdam, but in fact,

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the letters are crosses and arranged vertically.

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Xcentric . . . might be an exhilarated adjective for this twin-telephone booth truckable tug.

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X marks the spot . . . the X generating much more excitement than A or B or C  . . . marks the spot.

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I haven’t seen Treasure Coast in a spell.  Check this link for a great high and dry foto of  Treasure Coast‘s hull.

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Yeah . . . how could I not go here.  You knew it too, right?

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X . . . the ecstatic letter;  English really could function as well with “eks,” but the energy level, the fuel that drives ambition, would be diminished.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

E . . . enigmas.  I encounter many in my daily walkabout.  Although I  understand what happens if I don’t pay bills and what to do when I see a fury of red lights in my rear view mirror AND I understand “No” or “Oui” or “Sayonara” or their opposites, I rub shoulders and bump heads with lots of enigmas.   Sometimes I fail to understand my boss, my best friends, certainly the parrot living in my house, and even myself.  But if I had another life to live, I’d make it my business early on to understand engines.  My brother works on truck diesels and seems just to love them.  Some of you know tugboat engines well, but then others of you  have never seen one.

So here are a few.  Pegasus, which you’ve seen here and here.

aaaae2Cornell, which you’ve seen here and here.

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Orion, which you saw here and now works in Boston.  Notice the polished aluminium head covers!  For a similar engine room, see Fred Tug 44‘s fotos here.

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This is the block of an engine that once powered a 150 . . . or so foot tanker that sank;  it was salvaged and will someday provide parts for a repurposed work vessel that might just catch your eye in the sixth boro one of these years.

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Decreasing in size seems to decrease the enigmatic value of engines for me;  this relatively small Deere diesel powers Onrust when it moving without wind power.

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I’m guessing the huge block just behind the crewman in the center of the foto is a transmission rather than an engine;  the block along with the assembly and head supported by the gigantic chain all submerge when this dredge assembly is lowered into its work environment, the bedrock beneath the sixth boro.  For a charming watercolor of the business end of this unit done in boiled crawdad red,  see Bowsprite‘s latest here.

aaaae1Having called engines enigmatic doesn’t of course preclude my using them.  Something I really don’t understand is computers and the internet and cell phones and flip cameras . . .  and yet . . .  (Double click on a foto here and it enlarges;  I learned that today with ZeeBart’s help.)    If you know stuff about these or other engines, please share.  If you’ve a lot to say and fotos to go with, email me and you can do a guest post . . . fame and glory and big bucks . . . maybe even.  Otherwise,  engine room beauty shots . . . please send them.  From Steve, see the world’s largest diesel (maybe) here:  89′ long by 44′ high and generating up to 108,000  horsepower.

If you’ve never seen the engine room of a tugboat before, would you have expected a “white room?”

One things these fotos don’t represent is the deafening noise, but one of these days soon, I’m going to learn how to make these fotos talk and roar and maybe even sing in French.  Eh bien!  Till then, check out this tour of Moran tug Cape Cod‘s engine room.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Let’s backtrack . . .  is it only a month ago, less than a month ago, that Onrust launched?  Its inaugural trip down to the sixth boro and back evidence that Onrust the restless has reincarnated.   On that launch day, as Onrust settled to its level, tug Waterford and SPS-60 (in the distance) stood by.  Onrust‘s Deere engine waited patiently here, mere hours from propelling the sculpted oak through water for the first time.

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Tug Waterford has–like Governor Cleveland–a modern Caterpillar diesel, although I know nothing about the specs for either.

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Waterford arrived first on the launch site that morning dragging quite a puddening, like a grass skirt and elongated breadfruit or durians?

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SPS-60 (self-propelled scow) moved in with its crew of at least five, but

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not until it spun its stern toward me did I see this blue box and tube.

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Clearly it drove the scow, propelled it into position next to Onrust, but I had little sense of the “heavy duty outboard” until the next day when I stopped at the dry dock in Lyons.

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Older model maybe or rival manufacturer?  But no one there could tell me the name.  Of course,  the only people

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around were state highway workers.

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Then last week I found my answer from the captain of Governor Cleveland:  Thrustmaster . . . er Thustmaster of Texas.  Check out the company link here.  How’s that for a corporate name?

Check out the NYS Canal Corporation site.  Here’s Tug44’s Canal Corp site.  For unusual sail, check here.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Unrelated: “Unusual” is the mildest adjective to describe Saturday’s Mermaid Parade.  Drive, swim, subway, cycle . . .  come any way you wish . . . you won’t regret it.

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River Day 2 happened today, but I stayed on shore, among other things revisiting day 1.  My attempt here is to impose chronological and spatial order.  For starters . . . off Global Terminal in the Upper Bay, could there be a more diverse set of onlookers?  If the original Henry had seen indigenous equivalents of these, he’d have gotten his artillery out.

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Lined up just south of the Statue before 9 am, helmsman of Shearwater resorts to an ancient coping device.

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Around that time, Gateway Towing’s Navigator exited the Buttermilk Channel with an unidentified cargo on barge Sea Shuttle, which

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looked like this as it passed.  Anyone hazard a guess?

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Around 9:30 near Pier 82ish, this avian-wannabe brown truck cuts through the procession, triggering a siren/horn/hailer reaction in Lady BNYC Ducks simply continues and Lady B relents, all the official noise notwithstanding.  I suppose Ducks is commercial traffic and as such immune.

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Near Inwood a half dozen or so swimmers, each one escorted by a kayaker, make their way out of Spuyten Duyvil Creek and southward toward Battery Park City.  Swimmers and River Day processionistas remain largely indifferent to each other.  Can it be that New Yorkers have such passion for swimming that they spontaneously make their way in numbers around the island?

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This is lo-res, but after watching Onrust grow for over a year, I enjoyed recognizing its jolly crew, but who’s the guy in the red jacket and enormous feather in his cap.  Doesn’t the whole crew get ginormous feathers in their caps?

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If you read Juet’s log for June 1609, you learn that storms carried away Half Moon‘s  foremast.  What would that look like?  In my other blog, I try to channel Hudson’s thoughts, using what’s recorded in Juet’s journal to speculate on rambings in Henry’s head . . . historical fiction, of course.

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Yonkers gives each vessel a cannon salute.  Some return the salute.  I believe Onrust doesn’t, or maybe I was just not hearing things.

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Here a lone canoeist watches the procession from near Alpine, off the Palisades.  Does anyone know the design of local Lenape canoes of Hudson’s era?

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Large exploreNY400 banners hang from the vertical supports on either side of channel under the Tappan Zee Bridge.  Half Moon shows the scale.

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I regret I couldn’t follow Day 2 . . .  but I hope to catch up for Day 5.

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For a short video of the procession passing Battery Park City Day 1 around 9:15, see old salt blog here.

All fotos taken Day 1 by Will Van Dorp.

River Day is eight days if you want to be technical.  I’d like to do all of them, but . . .  The fotos here are roughly chronological and exclude relatively new active duty government boats.  Most of these vessels have appeared on this blog before;  use the search window if you wish to locate these posts.  Minimal prose today.  First, the raison d’etre, Half Moon passing Robbins Light.

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The “other” Dutch boat Onrust, not actually a replica of a boat made in the Low Countries.

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Shearwater passing in front of MOT (or MOTBY) and Explorer of the Seas.

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Fireboat John J Harvey.

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Vintage sky traffic.

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Mystic Whaler

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Clipper City

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Clearwater

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R. Ian Fletcher

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Governor Cleveland

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Adirondack

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Harvey again

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Onrust again

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OK, this is the quiz portion of the post.

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Quiz continues. . . .

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. . .

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A little over 25 miles (and six hours)  from the starting point, Half Moon passes the Tarrytown Light.

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And judging from the “face” in the stern of Onrust, launched less than a month ago, she’s a happy yacht.

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River Day will give Bowsprite so much fodder for continuing her sailing ship guide that she might not know where to begin!  Tomorrow’s itinerary is the 30 miles approximately between the Tappan Zee and Newburgh.

Many thanks to ExploreNY400 for the press passes and to Nicole for going the extra mile so that we got got the best fotos as well as to the staff of Circle Line who ran the very hospitable but unpictured vessel we were on.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp on River Day 1.  More to come.

So . . . can you think of any sixth boro schooners NOT depicted here?  I can think of a handful.  I wonder why they didn’t participate . . . .

Also, given the dearth of historical detail on the real Henry Hudson, Bowsprite and I have been reading his mate–R Juet’s log–and “interpreting/extrapolating Henry’s thoughts here.

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