You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Ojibway’ tag.

The year is in its last hours, and these vessels saw their last hours in this year as well.  Of course, this is a subjective list, made up of mostly photos I’ve taken over the years of sixth boro and Great Lakes vessels. This list is not definitive.  If you know of others, you might add them in the comments section.

Many photos of Helen McAllister have appeared here over the years, but time caught up with the 1900 Helen, who began and ended her life on Staten Island.  I caught her doing her last dance –a tango or a waltz– here.

More than 10 years of silence passed between the photo above at the McAllister NY yard and the one below in Tottenville.  Eagle-eyed Tony A. caught her stripped of her identification and ready for the scrapping jaws last month.

The 1907 Pegasus saw her end this year as well.  I spent many hours on Pegasus, and regretfully, sometimes the scrappers’ jaws are the most humane end for boats. 

The 1970 Joanne Reinauer III also saw its end.  I learned a lot about the modifications made to tugboat from her and from photos of her tranformations supplied by readers.  My photo below is from 2009.

The 1972 Viking also saw a series of modifications.  You might think a powerful machine like this . . . like these . . . would never wear out, but like you and me, they do.  I believe it was 2021 that she was scrapped, but it may have been earlier.  The photo below is from the September 5, 2010 tugboat race.

The Great Lakes shed some vessels also.  Mississagi began work in 1943.  I took the photo in Lake St. Clair in August 2016. She was towed to a Sault Ste. Marie scrapyard in October 2021.

Manistee dates from the same year and has the same dimensions–620′ x 60′– as Mississagi.  This photo I took in Toledo, where she had been laid up for some time.  More on Manistee here.

Ojibway, a 1952 bulker, is currently underway in the Saint Lawrence River, bound for Port Cartier with a load of grain.  After that, she’ll lay up awaiting an uncertain future.   For what it’s worth, she came off the ways the year I was born.

And on a sad note, the 1975 St. Clair was relatively new for a Great Lakes bulk carrier, but a devastating fire during winter layup  in February 2019 condemned her; she arrived at the scrapyard in Port Colborne just a few weeks ago. Photo here is credited to Corey Hammond.

Thanks to Tony and Corey for their photos;  all others, WVD, who wishes you all a healthy and happy 2022 and the fulfillment of all your goals.

And unrelated to this post but entirely germane to this day of reflection/new goal setting before a new year, check out Ellen Magellan’s expeditions.  That’s not her real name but it’s so clever I wish I’d come up with it. 

 

Daybreak finds us entering the Welland Canal, taking a pilot from J. W. Cooper.

The past few weeks at MRC have brought the decapitation of Algorail.

Tecumseh is docked just below lock 8.

Algosea slips into the parallel lock chamber at lock 4, upbound.

We encounter NACC Argonaut as she heads upbound below lock 2.

Then we switch pilots at Lake Ontario level and

we pass Ojibway as we make a course for Toronto.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Ice causes major disruptions, like the ones in Troy NY this morning.

Most of my previous posts featuring lakers were ice-free.  Even ones from a road trip I took specifically to see ice were ice-free.  Alpena had just lost her icy jacket.

Yet, I’m fascinated by navigation through the ice.  These photos give a sense of two weeks ago;  not it’s worse although most of the navigation has ceased here for winter hiatus.  I caught photos of CSL Assiniboine about 50 miles from here last September.  I love the curve she makes here in the icy St Marys River.

The classic Wilfred Sykes makes the turn down bound out of the Soo, where wind turbines catch power on the ridge. I’ve seen her before, but these are the first good photos I’ve gotten.

You can hear Sykes here in this video from almost two years ago, as she becomes the last laker to depart Escanaba with a load of ore.

And finally, for this installment, these shots of Ojibway in the Poe Lock show

what locks in winter look like.

As she heads down bound, she passes USCGC Katmai Bay WTGB-101, the first of the 140′ ice breaker class,

a 40-year-old vessel based in the Soo.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

One of these days I’ll do a post on Great Lakes moods, as I’ve so far seen them.  Actually, an essay on the range of conditions might be fun…

CCGS Samuel Risley, an icebreaking tug, hints at moods in months to come…

Lower Lakes Towing’s Ojibway makes for Hamilton, appearing almost a cartoonish version of itself thanks to fata morgana.

This view is looking at Sodus Point, where I learned to swim,  from just over 10 nautical miles.

 

For the first time, I see Donald Sea under way.

Science ship Ontario Explorer is also a first-timer.

 

And I’d love to know Rascal‘s story, tied up here in Oswego near Ontario Explorer.

Working on the breakwater is Madison R, home-ported in Duluth.  I’ll post more of her later.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

. . . meaning lacking self-unloading gear, which makes these vessels less versatile.  Manitoba was in exactly the same location–and similarly high in the water–a year ago when I was here.  With her traditional “‘house forward” design, she’s fearless and called a straight decker–having nothing but holds between the ‘house and the engine compartment .

Ditto Ojibway, only slightly younger than I am,

with some quite serious lock, ice, and dock rash.

Contrast them with Algoway, traditional design but with self-unloading gear.

Tim S. Dool, although gearless is generally not considered –as I understand it–a straight decker because it has its ‘house aft.

And what an attractive rake the forward portion of this house has.

Built in 1967, she’s starting to show some age,

on her graceful lines.

Finally, one more gearless vessel, Spruceglen.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who is grateful to boatnerd for the linked info.  Soon it’ll be time to order your new KYS “boat watching bible.” 

 

The cities of Sorel and Tracy surround the Richelieu River –flowing under those bridges–at the point it empties Lakes Champlain River into the Saint Lawrence.  I’ll admit from the start that I can hardly say I know this place, but here are some photos taken as we passed.

Sunny Young was taking on a grain cargo, I believe, and

 

Federal Caribou was tied up across the river’s mouth.

Laker Ojibway–a straight decker–I’m guessing was having its cargo discharged.

Sorel-Tracy is a steel and metallurgy center, although I can’t tell you much more than that.

 

Florence Spirit was at the dock slightly south of town.

What product is generally stored under these domes . . . can I get some group-sourced info?

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

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