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I should rename this post “Time Warp.”  I started it in May 2008 and this morning–in response to some Facebook exchanges–resurrected it.  Maybe I will begin a series called “Time Warp,” though, and any photos no more than 20 years old–to pick an arbitrary boundary and to keep the series from becoming ancient time warp which could be its own thing– . . . any photos you wish to contribute no more than two decades old would be welcome.   Maybe I gave up on this post six years back because I had too many unanswered questions.

Anyhow, to plunge back in . . . Robert Silva and Harold Tartell provided foto of Manhasset from way back, when it sported a flying horse on its stack . . . .  I assumed this vessel was long ago scrapped.  I’m also assuming the location of this shot can be pegged by the two LNG tanks in the background.

 

Here’s another shot of the vessel (1958) (or 1952) in transition, I presume, sent along by Robert Silva.

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Here’s a photo I took in 2008:  a different small tankship Mostank (1950) maneuvers close to a tanker.  I don’t know if Galahad is still in service, and

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Here in Arthur Kill to resupply, I suppose,  Mostank . . . M O S being Marine Oil Service.  Mostank shows up as registered until at least a year ago.  Emma Miller now serves the sixth boro.

Here’s where the time warp impinges on this post.  Great Gull was around still six or seven or eight years ago.  Time flies.  The Gull has flown south.

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Back then, John B. Caddell was still working.  Is she still intact?

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Nathan E. Stewart was still in town and here moving Mary A. Whalen to the Brooklyn Navy Yard.

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The unique Odin still worked here, and

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Weddell Sea was still known as Scott C.

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All photos here by will Van Dorp unless otherwise attributed.

 

 

Tis the season for giving, and what might be best to cool the friction, soothe the raw, heal the wounds, and soften the chapped?

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If you need it, it’s time for Sunny, launched in May ’08 from C & G.

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Or Rolf, the slightly older (identical?)  sibling.

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Lube, balm, antifricative . . .

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delivered by double- or single-hulled vessel, we all need it sometimes.  Even Galahad, and

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this has been a set-up for this song I hadn’t heard in a looong time.  Enjoy the soothe.

Unrelated:  Click here to see what pirates look like and what their repellers aboard the Chinese crane ship look like.

Channeling Galahad, Tennyson wrote: “My good blade carves the casques of men,/My tough lance thrusteth sure,/My strength is as the strength of ten,/Because my heart is pure.”

Mostank delivers the lubrication.

Diana plays lead romantic interest in my own personal mythology. In foreground, the tug Lee T. Moran walks her Norwegian tanker like a dog on a leash, or vice versa.

Daedalus, who built some really imprudent toys for his son, otherwise plays hero in my imagination. The tiny workboat Becky Ann zooms chooses not to linger nearby like a tool.

Hero was the ancient engine guy whose work we’ve mostly all seen.

We all know about Poseidon, although it might seem arrogant of titanic proportions to name a ship so. But where’s the Kafka?

Recently a good friend inspired me to pick up a Franz Kafka anthology, and I saw a short piece called “Poseidon.” Dedicating this to kennebec captain, whose blog about a recent voyage I’m really enjoying, I quote the first and then the best lines from Kafka.

“Poseidon sat at his desk doing figures. The administration of all the waters gave him endless work. He could have had assistants, as many as he wanted–and he did have very many–but since he took his job very seriously, he would in the end go over all the figures and calculations himself . . . ”

For all the hilarious set-up, the ending disappoints me: “Poseidon became bored with the sea. He let fall his trident. Silently he sat on the rocky coast and a gull, dazed by his presence, described wavering circles around his head.” Only Kafka would imagine the seagod as a frustrated pencil pusher.

Click here to read the short Kafka but complete text.

Call this the March 1 version. Even cold fanatics feel starved for more sunlight, blossoming perfumes, bright colors, and shorts. Iron Wolf below has that lean, post-winter hungry look.

 

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And Mostank needs some bright color, or does the 1950-launched tanker seem so forlorn because of the monochromatic background? By the way, that’s the west tower of the Verrazano Narrows Bridge beyond the ridgeline of Staten Island.

 

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Imagine Jay Bee V with bright paint and a tanned crew.

 

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Spring happens in March. For me, sooner is better.

This link on the history of tugboats as depicted on postage stamps cheered me up a little.

Photos, WVD.

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