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Check out the light exactly two years ago . . .  here.   And my first greetings this morning came from the Easter ducks, who’d heard about an egg hunt, I believe.   Mergansers passed too, but dove each time to hide bright colored bills.

Norwegian Gem, her bow painted like a post-modern Easter ovoid,  sailed into a harbor entirely tinted with the rosy fingers of dawn, ending a passage from Cape Canaveral.

Bavaria made an attempt to get out to sea.

Nor Gem shrinks the closer she gets to Manhattan’s passenger terminal.

Sea Lion (1980) heads Jamaica Bay bound to deliver a crane.

Buchanan 12, (1972) herself made over and painted anew for an Easter parade, enters the east end of the KVK.

Pathfinder charges forward between MOL Express and Overseas Atalmar.  Express left the Panama Canal 12 days ago, and will spend next Sunday in Europe.

A mariner stands watch.  What I’d give to be able to tell you his name, history, and his thoughts as he heads for sea on a Sunday morning . . .

And two last beasts  . . . unicorn and Oliphant . . .  round out our marvelous menagerie

I hope you enjoy this day . . . All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Superlatives:  Ti Oceania, largest working tanker at 441,000 dwt and 1246′ loa.  Oasis of the Seas, largest cruise ship at 1181′ loa and 234′ air draft;  ie., it cannot be shoehorned under the Verrazano Bridge.  Berge Stahl, largest bulk carrier at 365,000 dwt and 1125′ loa and draft of about 75′.  Here are other sites on this trio:  TO,  OS, and BS.

Immense!  Like these cranes, the likes of which you saw arrive in this March 2007 post.

Look closer and

eventually you see a dock worker, miniscule way up there.

And considering the scale of machinery and vast number of containers that need to be moved, it might interest you to see

what a crane operator sees, between his or her shoes.  Really . . . the operator booths have glass floors so that the spreader bar with flippers seems to shrink as it descends toward a container.

Sorry there was no ship in place when this foto was taken.  For an outside view of the operator booth, see the last foto here.

Here is scale difference of another sort, and because of

foreshortening, the distance between these two ships–Cielo di Napoli and Americas Spirit–seems recklessly small.

First three fotos thanks to Jed;  last four are mine.

Cargoes past featured–besides plain colored containers–trucks, and boats like this. Anyone know the cargo of a rowboat called Liv?  Unrelated to the sixth boro, but the answer follows at end of post.   Some of these

traveled to sea yesterday on

President Polk.  Military colors?  Some engines or generators traveled a little farther back.

No . .  cargo here is not cobalt.  But can anyone tell me the types of oils or chemicals she carries?  For pics of her launch, see here;  scroll down a bit.

As to cargoes or potential ones here, use your imagi . . .

nat

ion. I still have no confirmation what this fishing boat catches.  MOL Express, 964′ loa.  Bering Sea (ex-Stacy Moran and ex-Cougar) stands by barge in the distance.

E-Bos undergoes lightering.

Cargo on Padre Island . . . rich Hudson Valley silt, soon “dissipant” on the  seabottom.

And more on this later:  a group a thirsty folk in matching red uniforms evoking a certain cargo-delivery outfit from up north . . .  .  Could they have liberated themselves from the hold of Ambrose?  Would they be carrying TWICs?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  Liv . . . . info here.  Cargo/powerplant is a young woman named Katie Spotz.

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