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Three and a half years ago I started this series.  I realize now I should just have called the three posts for the ports in question:  Guaymas in Sonora, Manzanillo in Colima, and Lázaro Cárdenas in Michoacán.  Having started the way I did, the Ensenada post will then just follow the pattern.  With half a million people, Ensenada is the third largest city in Baja California.  Besides being the starting/ending point for the Baja 500 and 1000 races, it’s also an important fishing port, although less so than it was prior to the US tuna ban.   I have enough pics for a second post on Ensenada, so I’ll call this the fish and road version, with another to follow.

I took this photo from the road. Down there but out of sight at that moment were tuna pens.

Translate whatever you want on this menu.  I can vouch for the marlin ahumado, smoked marlin soup!  The $45.00 Mexican converts to about $2.25 US, and it was realmente delicioso!

Southern Horizon is inside the port tied up to a floating drydock. 

Galileo is too common a vessel name to locate.

 

 

From my conveyances, I was witness to the arid and steep terrain.

Other fishing machines lounged on the moorings.

This is the rocky shoreline south of Rosarito.

A few days later, I got lots of photos through a bug-spattered windshield.

 

 

All photos, WVD, who is back in the sixth boro, behind in work, but for now successful in reclaiming the reins from the robots.  I hope you enjoyed their tenure.  They will be back for an extended period in June.

I’ve been social distancing in Queens, but this didn’t prevent me from telecomexchanging the news with my sister.  She took these photos and told me about her experiences sailing in the Sea of Cortez.   You can click on the link to the article at the end of this post.

I hope to get to the Sea some day;  parts of it are designed a UNESCO World heritage site.

 

 

Isla del Carmen is a refuge for bighorn sheep whose future was threatened in mainland areas of Baja California.

The plethora of wildlife notwithstanding, the gist of the article was . . . the Sea for people in the time of COVID.  That is the link to the article.  I’d been arranging to get to Mexico a few months back, but it’s not going to happen for a while.

All photos, John and Lucy Knape.

For more of their photos, click here.

Quick . ..  name the oldest (or first) verifiable European settlement in current US territory?  Answer follows. Giovanni da Verrazzano visited the bay that became the sixth boro in 1524 but he didn’t settle.

This is the port of Guaymas, visited and claimed for Spain in 1539 by Francisco de Ulloa.  I can’t tell you anything about the tug here, Tolteca-1.  She looks like she could have been designed up north.  Anyone guess the La Paz BSC port of registry?

Click here for info on this port, and  connections between this port, 200 miles south of the Arizona border, and the US.  Here is an article on hopes for the port from the perspective of a few years back.

Rio Balsas is a crude oil tanker.

I’d love to learn more about Tolteca-1.  BCS is an abbreviation for Baja California Sur. 

Meanwhile, if you want to know more about Guaymas and the following:

-the first* ever aerial bombardment of a naval target,

pearls,

Rey Feo

and NASA . . .

 

click here.

And the answer to the question on the oldest settled current US city . . . . is St. Augustine, 1565!!

Many thanks to the Maraki crew for these photos.  More Maraki here.

 

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