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Since starting the blog, I’ve noticed constant change in the sixth boro, shorelines of the five boros and NJ, and a few other places I get to repeatedly.  For example, a year and a half ago Bayonne Dry Dock added their marine travel lift, and anyone looking in that direction gets treated to a rotation of work boats, revealing hull lines and wheels, the usually invisible parts of a boat. 

Saint Emilion (SE) spent about a month on the hard;  in fact, I caught her in the slings about to lift here a few months back.   In the photo above SE shares the yard with NRC Guardian, an oil spill response boat one hopes never to need.  Below the other boat is McCormack Boys. Seeing them juxtaposed like this illustrates the difference in scale between a 73′ tug and a 105′ one.

Beam on the two boats is a less dramatic difference of 38′ v. 26′.

Charleston, 95′ x 34′, has interesting five-bladed props, aka wheels.  For some sense of the variety of props, click here

Recently Alex McAllister was out of the water for a period of time, which could be as routine as you own car going up on the lift now and then. 

Note the Kort nozzles (ducted propeller)  that enclose the props on Alex. Nozzles can also be seen above on McCormack Boys.

All photos, WVD, whose previous high-and-dry posts can be seen here

I mentioned in yesterday’s post that this is the week tugster launched 16 years ago.  Back then and sometimes since, I sometimes describe this blog as a research project without a defined end point or goal;  observe, photograph, sometimes chat, analyze, repeat  . . . is the method. If analyze means reading, then google or whatever search engine you prefer . . .  is your friend.

That there are patterns is clearer now, even with and maybe because of occasional wrong deductions along the way.   Despite my frequent use of “random” in titles, my “patterns” geek level has climbed such that a newbie to the site might wonder about the minutae, the invented words and acronyms.  Trust me:  I still am (mostly) a sociable, balanced person albeit with the more maricentric perspective I strived for.  

In case you’re wondering, some video sources these days are What the Ship and marktwained, other maricentric and rivacentric sites.  Rivacentric . . . I like that   because seeing life from the perspective of rivers is not the same as seeing it from shoreless seas or  trails, roads and highways.  

I’ve been kicking a rival idea around in my head . . .  using the method described above, I’d love to do something–likely not a blog–about various agriculture/food production sectors now compared with how they were 50 or so years ago, the time when I was growing up with agricultural chores all year long on a family farm.  My brother dairy farms the “old” way on the land where I grew up, and friends work for today’s east coast megafarms.  Then there’s farming with poultry, beef and other meat animals, apples and other fruits, grains and other cash crops, produce, mushrooms,  . . . that’s only land farming and the list of farming types can go on . . .

I think about doing this ag then/now project a lot, but I have time to do only one research project, not both.

 

Lightning is here and has been for at least four years, and Thunder is on its way.

From 2014 and therefore two years newer than Lightning, Adeline Marie, previously Denise A. Bouchard, was heading over to the Industry Day on Wednesday. I caught a few photos of her as Rubia in between her original and her latest livery. 

The 2006 Kristin Poling first came to the sixth boro as the 5000 hp 111′ x 36′ Chesapeake.   Here was my first good view of her as a Poling/Cutler tugboat.

Atlantic Enterprise has been keeping busy with runs with dredge spoils from the North River passenger terminal out to the dump site aka HARS.   For a day’s worth of reading, click here for a July 2022 report on HARS. 

The 1981 Susan Miller pushes a small deck barge through congested waters here. She’s been working in the boro for as long as I’ve been doing this blog. 

The 1968 Marie J. Turecamo has worked in the Moran livery for over 20 years. 

Scale is clear from this side-by-side photo of the 2007 Saint Emilion (105′ x 38′ and 4800 hp) and the 1982 McCormack Boys ( 74′ x 26′ and 1200 hp), both hauled out over at Bayonne Dry Dock. 

The 2007 Normandy (79′ x 27′ and 1900 hp) has been in the boro since 2015. 

The 1981 Navigator (64′ x 24′ and 1200 hp)  has to be one among the busiest boats in the harbor and the region.

The 1975 Mary Emma (100′ x 31′ and 3900 hp) has worked under this livery since 2021.  I caught her transformation here about a year ago. 

All photos and any errors, WVD, who thanks you for continuing to read this blog. 

Thanks to Tony A, behold Patriot Marine’s Mulberry, still in the USAV livery from when she was ST-914

Photos are from New Haven, a port I’ve not visited, and with those raked masts . . . that appears to be Amistad along the shore in the distance.

I’ve looked unsuccessfully online for a list of USAV ST-900 series tugboats.  Anyone help?

Also, McCormack Boys has worked locally, ie, in the sixth boro, recently.

Here Boys tows some dredge equipment out of the KVK, as seen from a different angle.

Still another from Tony, Crosby Trojan appears to have done some assist work while in the sixth boro on its way to Maine. Trojan is currently enroute between Maine and Narragansett Bay.

 

I’m not sure which Genesis energy unit she is assisting.

And to close out this post, here’s an extraordinary set: USS Yorktown ( CG-48), a Ticonderoga-class cruiser being towed in the direction of the breakers in Brownsville by Miss Rui, which folks in the sixth boro might recognize as the former Norwegian Sea, and tailed by Annabelle Dorothy Moran, appears to be delayed.  As of this writing, she might be heading back to Philly.

Photos thanks to M’r Polychrome, who just happened to be transiting the area.

Miss Rui had been laid up herself near the Philadelphia Navy yard for some time before being purchased and rehabbed by Smith Maritime Ocean Towing & Salvage.

Many thanks to Tony a and M’r Polychrome for sending along these photos, extraordinary all.

April 1, 2011 … and this was not a joke.  More on this distressed vessel at the end of this post.

McCormack Boys and

Turecamo Girls with Barney Turecamo.  All three are still working in the same liveries, I believe.

Long Island-built Escort was phased out as a certain coal-fired power plant shut down.  She’s taken on new life as Northstar Innovator, based on NJ’s

Maurice River, although I’ve yet to see her. 

Stad Amsterdam is not currently in Amsterdam;  she’s not far away though in Scheveningen.  If you want to pronounce this shibboleth as a Dutch speaker would, have a listen. 

Spring sunrises . . .  Coming into port is the 2017-scrapped Atlantic Cartier

escorted by Ellen McAllister and

passing Bow Clipper and Maria J.  That tug is now Nicholas Vinik. Bow Clipper is now in Santos Brasil. 

The venerable Chemical Pioneer was ushered in by Ellen McAllister and McAllister Responder. I say “venerable” because she was built using the stern of Sea Witch, after a massive conflagration in the port, told here by the Fire Fighter site.   .

Two small USMMA boats made their way through the fog.   I’m not sure the name of the vessel to the left, but the one to the right was Growler and she’s back (though hidden away) in the sixth boro.

Of course, I post a photo of Kristin Poling, which had only a few months of service left at this point. She started service in 1934 as Poughkeepsie Socony.

Marion M . . . I’ve been told she was sold to parties in the Chesapeake who planned to restore her and put her up for sale in 2018.  Does anyone have an update on that?

And finally, we return to Le Papillon . . .  the 48′ steel schooner was dragged off the beach but I lost track of her after that.  I believe she was cut up.

It all seems like stuff from long ago . .    all photos, WVD.

2011 began in Charleston, a great place to welcome a new year.  Strolling around, I encounter the 1962 75′ buoy tender Anvil, 75301, here made up to CGB68013.  In the background, that’s cutter Cormorant or Chinook.

Heading farther north a day or two later, it’s Hoss, sister of Patricia, and now habitat for fish and other sea life.  Click here to see her sink if you do FB.

Still farther north, I see this T-boat, a 1952 Higgins named for a high point in Ireland.

Lucinda Smith, then based in Maine, is currently based on Cape Cod.

Bering Sea, like a lot of K-Sea boat, has become a Kirby boat;  it is currently in Philadelphia.  According to Birk’s invaluable site, this boat was Stacy Moran for a short time.  I never saw it in Moran red.

Thanks to my friend Paul Strubeck, this Kristin Poling needed an assist from Cornell to get through an ice jam.  This is one of my all-time favorite photos.  It looks to me like a submarine in the very deeps.

McCormack Boys was active in the sixth boro back in 2011, and although she’s still working, I’ve not seen her in years.

I glimpsed Stephen Scott in Boston a few months back, but since this photo was taken, she’s lost the upper wheelhouse.

There’s classic winter light beyond Torm Carina, provisioned here by Twin Tube.  Torm Carina is currently in the Taiwan Strait. 

Later Margaret and Joan Moran assist the tanker westbound in the KVK while Taurus passes.  Taurus has become Joker, wears Hays purple, and I’ve not even seen her yet.  I guess it’s high time I hang out in Philadelphia again.

A wintry photo shows McKinley Sea in the KVK eastbound.  In the distance,

notice the now foreign-based Scotty Patrick Sky.  If you want to see her, gallivant to St. Lucia.  McKinley Sea is currently laid up in Louisiana.

Erie Service, now Genesis Valiant, pushes her barge 6507 westbound. 

And on a personal note, it was in January 2011 that I stumbled into a locality that had been attracting me.  I suppose if ever I created a retreat, I’d have to call it Galivants Hideaway.   Here‘s another Galivants Ferry set of photos.

Thanks to Paul for use of his photo.  All other photos, a decade back, WVD.

 

This is an exercise in non-random fotos with word associations and any additional required info.  So, here, left to right move Margaret Moran, Admiral’s Launch, and Big Toot (the bright red one).  Big Toot?  Big anything?  Over-compensation.  Unconvincingly so.

Penn No. 4 foreground and USS New Jersey background.  If I’d snapped the foto a second earlier, there might be the illusion of the world’s first tug with six Mark 7 guns.   Signaling devices?    This foto is dedicated to she who’s drawn to such shades of gray.

Foto thanks to Allen Baker.  Atlantic Coast and McCormack Boys, Thanksgiving Day 2009.  Dredging:  unstuffing the belly of the harbor, doing the orukter.

Tasman Sea.  I love the eye at the waterline.

Amy C. McAllister.  I was going to say “tireless” but change that to indefatigable.

Buchanan 1 passing Coho.  Rusty and gray.

A slightly different shot of Grouper (ex-steamer tug Green Bay (see youtube clip below), still for sale. Patience and

fortitude.  According to Jeff’s comment, one of her captains is still alive and getting better at driving tugs at the young age of 89.  Could you have him write a comment or at least send along a foto of the unflagging captain, please.

All fotos but Allen’s by Will Van Dorp.

Click here to see posts for the week before the race in 2008.

Below, and occupying the notch, Lincoln Sea, participant with all 8000 horses in the 2006 race here.  I don’t know if Lincoln Sea (ex-S/R Everett from 2000)will be free to compete next week.

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I don’t recall either Joan Moran (1975) or Gramma Lee T taking part in years I’ve watched.  They showed fantastic torque yesterday spinning Andre Jacob on her axis.  Interestingly, see the last foto here a year ago with Andre Jacob then bearing the name Margara!!   Some vessels disappear to Alang;  others disappear but reappear hiding in plain sight with new names.

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I also don’t recall Hornbeck boats like Liberty Service (ex-Mac Tide 63 and Jaramac 63 from 1983) taking part.

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Or Witte boats like Thomas D. (from 1961 and formerly holding such names as Kendall P. Brake, Reliance, Tammy, Matty J, and  June C) , fotoed here at the Salt Fest yesterday.

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Ellen McAllister (1966) may have.

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I don’t recall Dann Ocean Towing boats, like Shannon (ex-Alice H and Chelsea from 1971) here,  competing.  That’s Captain Log off starboard and Houma off port.

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Greenland Sea (ex-Emma M Roehrig, S/R Providence, Tecumseh, and Doc Candies from 1990) I don’t recall.

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Or Great Lakes Dock and Dredge boats, like McCormack Boys (1982) here.

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I have friends who, when “talking” baseball or football can pull the most arcane details and statistics out of the air, as if they’d spend hours memorizing the stuff.  I hope someone following the sixth boro tug races has a  better grasp of statistics than me.

Bowsprite fotoed the vessel below a few days back from her cliff.  I’m intrigued.  Can anyone identify this yacht?  It’s Atlantide!!

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Remember,  Working Harbor Committee annual Tug Boat Race & Competition will be held on Sunday, 6 September from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. Pier 84 on the Hudson River.  Here’s a note from them: “In addition to selling tickets on our spectator boat (a Circle Line 42 vessel) we are offering 12 tickets for sale to be in the race on a tug TBD.  The price of a ticket is $250 per person.  The number of passengers is limited to 12.  Please email Meg Black —   meg@workingharbor.org — to purchase tickets.”

All fotos except the last one by Will Van Dorp, who waits with bated breath for Flinterduin.    Get your cameras ready; she arrives in the next 24 hours.

I’ll never forget the disappointment I felt when I first saw the Red Sea. A co-worker drove me to a beach south of Jeddah to snorkel. The “Red Sea” had lived in my brain since hearing the stories of Moses parting it to make a dry bypass, and to my surprise, it had grown to proportions of spectacle it couldn’t match. It dismayed me that the Red Sea at first glance looked no different than the Lake Ontario of my youth. Yet, once I waded in, dove, and looked around, I could have been on a different planet. The mundane was transformed.

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Now I don’t mean to say corals and tropical fish flourish at the bottom of the harbor in our sixth boro. Not at all. My point here is that the harbor bottom gets shifted around a lot, as molded and transformed to fit our needs as the dry space in the other five boros.

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I am curious about the tug Little Bear shown here. What company does she work for? Is it the tug built in Florida in 1952 by that name? The size and design look right, but where is she based?

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Foto quality suffers here because this procession headed eastbound on the East River on a hazy day. It’s the bucket dredge New York belonging to Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company.

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I’ve no idea what bottom of which harbor they work in now. Actually, GLDD Company has projects worldwide; they may be dredging the Red Sea, bringing up bottom and drying it out.

Thanks Richard for the top two fotos of Little Bear, taken along the Manhattan side of the Hudson.

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