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Although I have many more “oldcarcity” fotos to share soon, John Watson got the following fotos from his sixth boro cliff yesterday, and they must go up.  Kudos , John!

John’s fotos are physical manifestations of the renaissance of South Street Seaport Museum.  Lightship Ambrose (LV-87), built 1908 . . . a year after  Pegasus, is headed to Caddell’s for some love aka life support.

She made her way across this stretch of the sixth boro escorted

by the gracious Charles D. McAllister.

as well as Elizabeth McAllister.  I can’t identify the smaller boat out front.

Again, thanks much, John.    Here’s a question from a tipster . . . not me! in ny.Curbed.  This is very promising news for the renascent museum; however, like all newborns AND reborns, it needs ongoing support . . . benjamins and members and volunteers.

My last fotos of a lightship in the sixth boro came here exactly two months ago.

Meanwhile, tugster continues a gallivant in the south . . . today off to a high point between Nickajack Lake and Chickamauga Lake.

Unrelated to this post but to one previously, here’s (thanks to Michele) is an interview/TV report from on-board Giulio Verne.

Two and a half decades ago (almost) I was entering New Hampshire from Quebec and was stumped:  the US border agent brought his face to about a foot from mine and asked: “How does someone from Massachusetts (my drivers license) and someone from Maine (her drivers license)  meet?”  I knew he wanted a short, convincing answer, and I thought in paragraphs and chapters even.

This shot immediately reminded me of  that experience:  how does a tugboat from San Francisco and one from New York end up lashed together, no longer floating,

cradled on the broad back of Mighty Servant?  The answer is . . . it’s complicated and it’ll take paragraphs and chapters to relate.

And I certainly don’t know much of the story.  What I do know is that at 0902 today, here’s what I saw.

The barges loaded yesterday were still being secured, crew fine tuning as they would a huge

musical instrument.  What music would you like the Mighty Servant to play today?

0951 hr . . .  Charles D. McAllister and Gabby Miller brought their various powers to bear on the travelers.

Centurion and Hercules have pleasingly different bows.

Note the small boat (Bobby G?) preparing Centurion’s entry.

Even Bohemia comes by.

1047 hr . . .  shoehorning is happening on the far side as Albermarle Island passes with a load of Ecuadorian fruit.

From this angle, Mighty Servant thusly loaded reminds me of an ocean going sidewheeler, like SS Savannah.

By 1047, she seemed loaded and I couldn’t tell if

the deballasting aka raising had begun.

More may follow.   All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Oh . . . sorry, Johna.  I could say I picked her up hitchhiking . .  . to spice up the story.  The truth is we were coworkers in a publishing company and that led to some fairly spiced up waterborne adventures;  we were just returning from a jaunt up the St. Lawrence northeasterly from Quebec City.   If you want more on her . . . Diana, a major true love and heartbreak, you’ll have to read My Babylonian Captivity.  Diana is not her real name.

So, I watched today until a bank of clouds slid in and turned all light monochromatic.  While watching, thoughts that came to mind included . . . “mighty patient” you have to be to load such a vessel, or watch it.

0851 hr . . .  Gabby floats all alone on the Bay . . . that bodes well.  Mighty Servant 1 has been in port less than a week.

0922h.  Mighty Servant spins with the beginning of the flood tide.  Once in place, she will be mightily served.  Note the orange tender hanging from Mighty’s port side.  I’ll call it Lesser Mighty.

And some lucky end-o-seasoners heading south catch a rare view.

0943 hr . . . RTC 105 arrives, pushed by Bruce A., house up, and then

0954 . . . house down and she leaves the barge in the able hands of Gabby and Linda L. Miller.  There’s an invisible Ellen on the far side also.

At the same moment, the orange tender aka Lesser Mighty  delivers

the tower crews to their stations to winch the load into place.

1002 . . . Lesser delivers line handlers onto the RTC 105 as well.

1021 .. . Ellen and Bruce approach

with mighty patience and care.   Note the gray towers on the far side.

1058 . . .  Note the additional Miller boat, Barbara,  in the foreground and the next barge in the distance.

1107.   Lines gets shuttled between RTC 105 and Servant by Lesser.

Whatever was the snafu, the barge gets hauled off, then back on, and line shuttling gets shifted to Bobby G.,  a small Miller boat,

who makes stuff happen,

who weaves a web, and who earns the nom-de-guere More Than Lesser Mighty Servant.

1225.  By now, the lines get snugged, Ellen, Bruce, and Bobby G move over toward the next barge.  And a thick winter cloud moves in.  With cold fingers, I leave for other projects, but the loading goes on.  Maybe I’ll return tomorrow early.

Mightily done, crew!

Are there shadows when you can’t see them?  Others forces exist though invisible like tides, winds, markets, seasons, combustion,  zeitgeist, …

inertia, gravity,

attitude, determination, pheromones,

friction, electromagnetic fields, stardust,

love potion #9, entropy, tea leaves . . ..

Why things happen . . . a soup of forces govern this, too many to keep track of, unless you have to. 

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who has forces tugging at his heels today.

Maersk Kentucky turns at least 90 degrees to starboard after passing under the Bayonne Bridge.  Beyond Shooters Island lies the city of Elizabeth, NJ.  More close-ups of Maersk Kentucky–eleven years running and a fifth of a mile long tomorrow, but for now, she draws more than 30 feet max . . . and notice the mud trail she stirs up.

Here’s a satellite view of Shooters Island;  I believe the vintage foto of Shooters I posted the other day was taken from midway between the A pushpin and the New York ramp of the Bayonne Bridge.  Click on the satellite foto to see where things lie in relation to Manhattan.  Most of the container traffic through the port of “New York” operates through Port Elizabeth.

Again, here’s a tightly-cropped foto of Shooters around World War 1, and here’s a

foto I took from mid-Bayonne Bridge pedestrian way this morning, where I got my exercise.

As I walked over, Maersk Kentucky traversed beneath, tugs Resolute at the bow and Elizabeth McAllister near the stern, making the turn and then


heading into Newark Bay, a half an hour

or so behind Sea Land Eagle, roughly the same size as 1997-delivered ‘Kentucky.  The land in the foreground is Bergen Point.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Related:  See Johna and Vladimir’s homage to the Bridge here.

There always needs to be a first time, for everything.  Maria J (ex-Jesus Saves)  did it for me . . .

my passing from innocence to experience.  I picked the day, bridge dedication plus 80 years with vivid bridge shadow on the water.  Land in the distance is Elizabeth, NJ;  point on right is Bergen Point . . . a section of Bayonne, NJ that once was a farm of tanks . . . an orchard if you prefer.

Zim Virginia was the first ship

to pass beneath me.  Anyone know of fotos of traffic through here 80 and 75 and 50 years ago?

Charles D. McAllister assists port side, and

besides the hard over rudder,

Maurania III, starboard, nudges the vessel to starboard to

avoid Shooter’s Island and head up to Port Elizabeth.

Happy dedication day!  If you missed the link to the pdf published by the Port Authority upon the 75th anniversary, click here.  Great vintage pics.  If you missed the diagram of the planned approximately 80′ raising of the roadbed, click here.

All foto by Will Van Dorp.

So concludes this series . . . with total time elapsed from Qatar nosing around Bergen Point until Suez Canal Bridge‘s stern clearing the west side of the Bayonne Bridge  . . .  about 50 minutes.  Furthermore, a fourth vessel–Seatrout–traversed in that same time period, as did RTC 135, moved by Nicole Leigh Reinauer.

So while you’re enjoying –I hope–these fotos, let me do some math.  Using deadweight tonnage info available in that magic library called the internet, I total the cargo capacity of these four ships and one barge as  . . . 223,157 tons.  And I’ll assume (just an assumption for sake of discussion)  that each of these vessels was at its peak capacity.

While the math process is going on, enjoy the fotos of Ellen McAllister helping rotate Sea Land Mercury at Bergen Point.

Assuming that an average semi-trailer carries 20 tons of cargo, I come up with the equivalent of 11,157 truckloads of cargo passing below this bridge . . .   in 50 minutes!!

Now I’d love to see my illustrator or modeler/gamer friends depict the KVK as a highway and

run 11,000+ trucks under this arch in 50 minutes!  Read the thoughts of  Ellen McAllister captain here, thanks to gCaptain.  Another article on Ellen appeared here  in the Wall Street Journal today!

Imagine noise and fumes of 11,000 trucks/per hour . . . and impact on traffic flow.  The final shot here shows the stern of APL Qatar, Marion Moran, Seatrout, and the bow of RTC 135.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  As of this writing, Sea Land Mercury is already between Savannah and Mobile.

And if you’re wondering why none of these fotos were taken by the new camera, I was lugging it, but it confounded me by moving one of its own buttons and not working until I got home.

I took six of these fotos with my camera and four with another, given to me, that costs three times as much as mine.  Can you distinguish which is which?  I realize I might NOT YET be able to get top performance from the second camera.  Or maybe in this format it’s impossible to distinguish one from the other . ..  because they’re like oil and oil.  Or like these two tankers, contorted together like slugs in love.  Ever seen slugs in  . . . love?

Mahanadi Spirit gets assisted from her berth by

Charles D. McAllister, spun counterclockwise and

sent out

to sea with additional assist by Maurania III.

Next to move was Chemical Pioneer, with the same

assist team.

A bit later, sibling tankers came in to the dock.  Noble Express came in followed by

Silver Express.

Docking looked like this, one vessel almost merged with the other.

And can you tell which fotos were taken with camera A and camera B?

Answer is down a bit.

Slugs in love . . . I first saw it waiting at the commuter rail station a few weeks back at 6:15 am, thinking I should have had more coffee . . . .

Please . . . some feedback.  Be blunt and frank about the quality of fotos on this blog.  Pass the link onto any professional photographers even.  I’m re-examining my aesthetic.  And after seeing slugs in love, I can handle anything, even dragonfly love.

Answer:  The first three were with my usual camera, then three with camera B, then two one with mine, then one more with camera B, and the last two were with mine.    The two cameras in question were mine (SP 590-UZ Olympus) whose weight and zoom capability I love and a Sony Cyber-shot DSC R1.

is a 45-year-old hottie.  Just look at the heat shimmer enveloping her.

She first appeared here in 2007.   I’ve also referred to her “bucket fenders” aka training wheels here.

This may be repetitive, but Ellen was built in 1966 and rebuilt in 2007.

When watching assist tugs like Ellen, it’s hard for me to avoid anthropomorphizing.  Ellen strikes me as a hunter who always returns with her quarry.

Note the position of her bucket fenders in relation to the flare of the ship’s bow.

If it is about hunter and prey, these Sea-Land Racer crew seem not displeased to be captured by the likes of Ellen.  I’m guess Racer carries an all-US crew.

I understand.  Fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Where might that gull go if it were to tag along on this vessel with exotic names for  the rest of the year?  Guesses?

I took this foto as it entered the KVK this morning from Savannah bound for Port Elizabeth . . . aka Port of New York/New Jersey.  Well, it leaves here tomorrow bound for sea and will be back just before New Year’s 2012.  And before returning, it’ll have done the following ports in this order:  Halifax . . .

Kingston, Panama Canal, LA, Oakland, Vostochnyy, Ningbo, Shanghai, Pusan, Balboa, Panama Canal, Kingston, Savannah:  voyage #28 for Zim Beijing.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who wishes I could tag along.    The escort tug was Charles D. McAllister.

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