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Meagan Ann, Seattle-built in 1975.  Note the glazing and  icicles.

For more info from Birk and Harold’s site, , click here.

McAllister Responder’ s name alludes to its former role as an oil-spill response vessel.

Until 2009, the Florida-built vessel was immediately distinguishable from Charles D. McAllister by her boom spool.

Tasman Sea comes out of Louisiana in 1976.

Click here to see her as Ambassador.

Magothy is a Patapsco-class 4200 hp vessel launched in 2008.

Hornbeck Tidewater equipment seems less frequent in the sixth boro these days, but last weekend I caught

Gulf Service and

Huron Service, 1979 and ’81 respectively.   Astern is the unmistakeable Atlantic Salvor, itself a former Tidewater boat.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was 10.

And here, from John Van Staalduinen,  are fotos of Legend, a sibling of the virgin tug Liberty I posted about a month ago.  Doubleclick enlarges. The size of this behemoth can

measured using the load line (draft markings) on the stern.  Eyeballing it, I’d say that from the top of the stern bulwarks to the top of the brownish bottom paint is almost 20′.  I.e., if (post-launch obviously) I dove from the bulwarks into the water, it would be a long way just to the water!  ??  Stern anchor is already in place.

Also at the shipyard in Anacortes, John got this foto of a dry-docked Nanuq, a 301′ loa oil recovery/platform supply vessel build by Edison Chouest.  Nanuq was delivered in May 2007; here’s a youtube of its launch.   Click here for a foto/info on the newest vessel Edison Chouest is undertaking for Shell’s Arctic drilling.

And from Isaac of the tugboathunter blog, this foto taken in Toledo. OH, (it reminds me of those shots taken by “future car spies”) of the former tugboat Cleveland, possibly headed for the sixth boro as the new (and third) Patrice McAllister.  Another shot of the future Patrice can be seen in the last foto here on this post from Isaac’s blog.  For archival shots of the vessel, check out Birk and Harold’s site, of course.

Thanks again John and Isaac.

Related:  If you haven’t seen Jed’s blog, Cumberland Soundings, check it out here.

Also related:  I’m suddenly thinking seriously about visiting the Panama Canal.  A site like this one gives me the impression that there is an Canal/shipping enthusiast-friendly tourist infrastructure in Panama.  Can anyone who’s been there comment?  Would it be better to use Panama City or Colon as a homebase for a four-day trip?  The “screen capture” below is interactive but time sensitive.  When I studied traffic just now, I quickly recognized a half dozen vessels I think I know from their transit through the sixth boro.   One is NYK Meteor, which I got fotos of eight days ago exiting the KVK.  Is this possible?

Here are 4, 3, 2, and 1.  Ooops . . here’s another 1, featuring a June K.

Winter’s not over, and there has already been SOME call for salt on roads and walkways, but mostly it’s been a low-salt season around the sixth boro.

The other morning I thought I’d see bulker Irene rotated by Ellen McAllister, but it turns out

Ellen was lying in wait for the container vessel appearing

around the bend.

The salt trade is ancient.  Since I’m thinking about gallivants a lot these days, I recall hearing about salt caravans out of the Sahara to ports in North Africa for trans-shipment to Europe.  Even if I didn’t travel on a camel, seeing salt slabs in traditional boats on the Niger River . . . would suffice.  Back in 1977 I was finished with a job in Cameroon and had the option of adventuring across the Sahara (hitchhiking) through another desert city called Agadez, and opted out.  I still regret that choice sometimes.  Two friends did it.   I thought of this again recently while reading Vuvuzela Diaries.

What traveled north for centuries was salt as well as gold;  what traveled south to Timbuktu were European “luxury” goods, including books.   Here’s another BBC video on the scholarly libraries of Timbuktu.

If mild and dry weather prevails for the rest of this winter, Mt. Salt will remain here along Richmond Terrace.  The small vessel off Irene‘s stern here belongs to the NYC DEP.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

But first, bowsprite’s talked about her online art store for some time, and yesterday . . . officially, she launched it.    Please traffic it.  I wouldn’t want her till to look like the one I found along the KVK yesterday.  See the jam-packed cash drawer below.  Come spring it might be full of green.

I love it when traffic in the KVK is dense:  here (l. to r.) Mediterranean Sea, Siberian Sea (?), Margaret Moran, and Cosco Tianjin.   In the distance is Robbins Reef Light and the old Williamsburgh Savings Bank tower in Brooklyn.

Dubai Express, Austin Reinauer, and Brendan Turecamo.   Invisible on the starboard side of Dubai is James Turecamo.

Here a small Triple S Marine (Aren’t they based in Louisiana?) boat bounces past Lucy Reinauer.

APL Japan, Elizabeth McAllister, Marion Moran, and McAllister Sisters . . . I believe, with the Brooklyn skyline in the distance.

Meagan Ann and OOCL Norfolk . . . with cables of the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges in the distance.

Sea Lion pushes a barge of equipment ahead of MOL Endurance.

Among the pieces of equipment on this Mobro barge, what intrigued me was this Caterpillar designed to operate in wet places.

Finally for now . . . Beaufort Sea tails Maria J and Frederick E. Bouchard.

With traffic this heavy, I can see bowsprite will be very busy drawing and sketching while the robots staff the store.   Or maybe she could have robotos out sketching while she keeps the rust off her cash register?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Saturday mornings are slow in some places, but not in the shipping channels of the sixth boro, Pearl River 1 enters the Narrows, passes Morton S.  Bouchard Jr., arcs to port into the ConHook Range,

and navigates the KVK with assistance from Ellen McAllister.

At this moment, opposing container ship traffic about 15 minutes away appeared under the Bayonne Bridge, behind Stephanie Dann and an unidentified tug.

It’s a heavy-laden Cosco Osaka, tailing Catherine Turecamo.

As Cosco Osaka aka IMO 9400291 passes the Green 7, it crosses Jane A. Bouchard.

Fifteen minutes later, Ance enters the KVK.

That’s A-n-c-e . . .  not A-n-K-e, which came through the harbor a mere two weeks ago.   Ance . . .

or “Ants,” as I heard it.

Less than 10 minutes behind Ance was this beautiful-orange vessel, here flushing out the starboard hawse.

I wrote about Twinkle Express here a mere two years ago, but that time I didn’t get as close.

And ten minutes behind was this vessel.  Doubleclick on any foto to enlarge;  if you do that here, you’ll see the builders plate proudly announcing this vessel as a June 2010 product of Yangzhou Guoyu Shipyard.

Now . . . given the name and given the frequency of  livestock carriers in the harbor like Shorthorn Express near the end of this post, what do you suppose this vessel carries?

Answer tomorrow.  All fotos (except Anke . . .  sounds like the end of  Yanqui )   taken today in a short two hours on the KVK by Will Van Dorp.

For a distinctly unglamorous view of shipping cleanups after “stuff goes wrong,” watch the slideshow on the TitanSalvage page.

This short dozen tugboats chosen because they passed on a given part of a morning recently differ in size, age, tasks, and number of fleet siblings.  Less visible are their differing histories and crews.

Laura K Moran, 2008 built in Maine 87′ loa and 5100 hp here escorting in Ever Devote.  Below her is Caitlin Ann, built in Louisiana in 1961.  70′ loa and 2400 hp.

Vane’s Bohemia and Quantico Creek differ in many respects:  2007 v. 2010, 4200 v. 3000, Louisiana v. Maryland, and 96′ v. 90′ loa.

Below them, escorting Dubai Express,  is James Turecamo, 1969 built in NY, 92′ loa and 2000 hp.

Greenland Sea, built in Louisiana in 1990, 4200 hp and 112′ loa.

Below her is Barbara McAllister, 1969 built in Louisiana, 100 loa and 4000 hp.

Charles D. McAllister, 1967 built in Florida, 1800 hp and 94′ loa.

Margaret Moran, shown twice escorting Cosco Tianjin, 1979 built in Louisiana, 99′ loa and 3000 hp.

Two former SeaBoats tugs are now Mediterranean Sea and Weddell Sea, both built in Massachusetts and powered by 4500 hp.  Mediterranean Sea (110′ loa)  was launched in 2004; Weddell Sea  (105′ loa) launched 2007.

Finally, it’s Nicole Leigh Reinauer, Alabama-built, launched in 1999, 119′ loa, and 7200 hp.

All fotos this week by Will Van Dorp.

Friday afternoon I timed a foray on the harbor perfectly with respect to light.  Here’s a previous “golden hour” post, from over four years ago.   And although I’m not a literalist with much, the “hour” the other afternoon lasted less than 20 minutes.

16:24 . . .  guided by the new wind turbine, Hanjin Albany and two unidentified tugs catch the beginning of the gilded light. I’m not sure what Hanjin Albany carried in or intends to carry out.

16:25 . . .  in a different area of the Upper Bay, APL Turquoise and Charles D. McAllister (or is it McAllister Responder??) have not quite entered that enhancing light.

16:37 . . . same APL Turquoise and Charles D. (I’ll assume) are now fully adorned in gold.   Solomon Sea pushes a set of scows with golden sand.

Too short this light lasts;  in 30 minutes it’ll be winter night.

16:36 . . . Giulio Verne in a different part of the harbor bathe in lesser amounts of this light.

Solomon Sea‘s sand piles could not be more embellished.

But by 16:42 . . . the brilliance diminishes already unless

here, at 16:42 and beyond Staten Island’s shadow, Samuel I. Newhouse and RBM 45612, still linger in the golden light.

All fotos during this 18-minute interval, by Will Van Dorp.

Wow!  Almost 40 years ago, another 18-minute unit was significant.

Late first snow this season unless you count the few flurries over the sixth boro last October, but flakes did obscure vision this morning.   Of course, Cheyenne is always recognizeable and busy, but Arabian Sea (in green) I had to guess at.

Laurie Ann Reinauer  . . . well, I could read the name on her derriere.

But Barbara McAllister I had to guess at.  (Harold corrects me . . .it’s Amy C. McAllister.  Thanks, Harold.) Snow flakes just blocked out the name.

Franklin . . . I know the profile AND can read the name even with my cokebottle glasses.

But I was looking for a good 10 minutes at this right in front of me and did not even SEE it.  No, not Sanko Blossom, but that new feature beyond her . . . that light colored structure obscured

now and again by a squall.  It wasn’t there a few days ago.

It’s good for my self-confidence that I saw the tower yesterday also, and got fotos of the 260′ tower then, over beyond Hanjin Albany.   Otherwise I might have suspected it came with the storm.   The blades weren’t turning, though, in spite of the wind, since it won’t go operational for a month or so yet. 

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s already wondering if Bayonne can be convinced to put bright colorful lights on the tower next December.

So many places and vessels, so little time.  Wilmington, NC . . . you’ve taken a piece of me, and I’ll be back for it.  Margaret McAllister sees Louise Knutsen toward the Cape Fear mouth.  See Louise in the sixth boro here a year ago.

 

Capt . George here at the dredgers’ pier.

Two Southern Dredging vessels assist two barges to the work site as hunters return to the boat ramp.

Left to right:  Cape Henry, Fort Macon, and Turecamo Boys.

Excursion yacht Mary Elizabeth seems to have a vintage that’s covered over for business.  Anyone know when she was launched?

This plant, which I’ll call just Venus or Dionaea muscipula, is native to areas within a 60-mile radius of Wilmington!!  Who knew!  The city has devoted public art to this carivore.

And the final fotos here I dedicate to bowsprite, who bedazzles with her art.  BB-55

is the epitome of bedazzling armor.  But if

ever she needed to float out of her cove, she’d need all dredgers and then all tugs available along the Cape Fear and from all ports within a few hundred miles.

Cheers from the road.   All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I wouldn’t dream of missing Bowsprite‘s lead, so here goes.

My latest gallivant has found me here,

a location I zoomed through last year.

The vessels in this post

reveal this river on the East coast

Whose name most know as  ___ ____r.

So here are the clues:  Margaret McAllister and a warship in the distance.

Kathryne E. and another shot of Margaret McAllister.  The appearance of “arms” is given by dredge Cherokee.

Dredge tug Fleming passing an unidentified wreck, whose identity I of course want to know.

R/V Dan Moore and Cherokee.

Cape Henry escorting in Petrochemical Supplier pushed by Corpus Christi.

Closer -up of Cape Henry.  All these are just SOME of the activity on New Year’s Day on the river called

Cape Fear.    By the way, R/V Dan Moore docks at the CFCC Technology Pier, part of the Cape Fear Community College offerings.

Bonne annee . .  . more soon.

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