You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Maersk Vilnius’ tag.

They come, they go . . . and we never get to know more than the names, unless something unusual happens, as was the case with Ever Forward.  More on that at the end of this post.  Some names are intriguing, like CMA CGM Osiris, likely among the newest cargo ships calling in the sixth boro, part of the CMA CGM Zephyr class. 

 

Chipolbrok–the name– made no sense until I looked up its origins.  The agreement has been around longer than I have!!

Bulk carriers have the best names . . .  like Common Luck. 

Maersk Vilnius is a regular in the boro, last posted here in January. 

So is MSC Tomoko, although I’ve not posted any photos of her before. 

Fairchem Copper has never appeared here before, although sister Fairfield tankers have

Ortolon . . . that’s a word origin I never suspected!  Making sense of Ortolon Coco, that defeats me.  

Ice Fighter . . .  I saw this and immediately thought of Ice Babe Base of many years ago.

I started with a CMA CGM Zephyr, so it’s a good place to end . . .  and they crossed paths in the boro:  Osiris, meet Apollon.

 

All photos, WVD.

Here’s the story I alluded to earlier:  a graphic novelist —Jordan Crane–had his latest book printed overseas and it–along with other new books–was traveling back to the US aboard Ever Forward.  Crane also had a book tour planned, where he would distribute copies of the new book.  Well, Ever Forward messed up those plans!  Long term though, this delay revealed this story, and that may just boost his sales, like a double-printed postage stamp or doubly-struck coin. Well, if I were Crane, I would play up this angle.  And Ever Forward, it appears she’s back in Baltimore.  I’ll bet the pilot and crew will be very nervous around the Craighill Channel. 

 

January is named for Janus, the one who looked forward and backward . .  . transitions, this Roman.  The connection is this . . .   one day i post photos from 2022 and the next or two I post photos from the 1950s, supplied by Albert Gayer.

Charles James, framed here by the big green Tokyo Triumph and an Apex barge, pushes a bow wave in front of her.

Here’s the 13, 600 teu Tampa Triumph class ULCV that followed Charles James.  You also notice Maersk Vilnius following the ULCV. 

I know that names are just for convenient, but I wonder why this class of five Costamare ships carry the names Tampa, Tokyo, Toledo, Taipei, and Texas Triumph.  Surely there are larger cities starting with T. In fact, Tampa and Toledo don’t even make the top 50 by population.  And if Texas,  then why not Tennessee?  Taipei is fine because it’s home to Evergreen, the operator.

She’s deep, although I’ve seen deeper.

From the time she starting moving from her berth to the time she departs through the Narrows takes avbout an hour. 

The fact that all those containers can leave safely makes an hour a short time.

She meets Oleander coming in for her usual Thursday appointment, and this meeting shows relative scale of these two cargo ships.

I mentioned Maersk Vilnius earlier in this post;  I don’t recall ever seeing one container ship overtake another as they race out toward the Narrows.

All photos, WVD.

Melville explains Ishmael’s signing onto the whaling ship as related to that damp, drizzly November in [Ishmael’s] soul, but this series shows that a windy, dark October can trigger running away too.  I’m thrilled that today’s forecast calls for sunshine, and some reason for optimism.  Here are previous weather posts.

A few days ago we arrived in the sixth boro under clouds swept along by winds.

Someone who’s not been along Manhattan for a few decades would not recognize the city.

Rebecca Ann assists a scrap scow alongside Nordic Barents, a bulker I saw on the Saint Lawrence discharging ore less than month ago.

 

Joyce D.  is likely over to assist James.

DAT’s Dong-A Metis and Humen Bridge transfer cargoes in Bayonne. DA

T (Dong-A-Tanker) seems an odd name for a PCTC RORO.

A container ship, rusty from the oceans, passes the salt pile over along Richmond Terrace.

RTC 145 moves out of the Kills

with all the horsepower supplied by Christian.

All photos last week by Will Van Dorp, who’s now heading out to enjoy the sunshine.

 

xx

Yesterday was a day to hold onto to your hat . . . or tighten the straps.

Ruby M splashed in toward the Kills, where Maersk Vilnius was exiting, but it was the yawl Mah Jong

that appeared to thrive in these conditions, passing Corpus Christi‘s stern.

Meanwhile Caitlin Ann delivered the netted paper to the recyclers.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who stood at a diagonal into the wind while snapping these shots of the sixth boro.

Here–for the most part–are previous winds and windy posts.

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