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By the way, A to P, if you suffer from CRS as I do, expands to Atlantic to Pacific, across the skinny continent of Panama.  Today’s post makes me want to create a “crew finder” profile, as this would be a way to gallivant across the Pacific in style, in exchange for less work than young Melville was expected to perform.

Let’s make this a numbers post.  Yersin, launched 2015, cost $70m.  I don’t know my cabin cruisers that well, but the boat in the foreground with an overload upforward has US boatbuilder lines.

Yersin, when launched, was set up for 20 crew and 20 guests.

Yacht Lionheart runs a cool $150m.  Forty crew attend to 12 guests.

Andiamo is “low end”:  12 guests and 6 crew.  Ice-class hull, she was offered for sale in 2012 for $20m.  I believe I’ve seen her on the Great Lakes or the Saint Lawrence or the sixth boro, but that could be just a common name.

Joseph Conrad (ex-Saturn) dates from 1916, with a major refit in 2004.  She can run with 8 guests with 5 crew.  Priceless.

Azuleta, a Turkish gulet, is also priceless here, and works charters out of Panama City.  For some other gulets for sale, click here.

Rocinante, 2008 with a 2015 refit, has 32 crew for 12 guests.  She recently changed hands for $128m.

Constance dates from 1986, and 10 crew serve 10 guests. Previous names are PAMINUSCH, MONTEATH, MONTIGNE, and JANA.

Wind Star, launched 1986, accommodates 148 passengers with 101 crew.  I recall the excitement back 30 years ago when she was said to be the first commercial sailing vessel of this size built in over a half century.

Dorothea III, $50m, was launched in 2007 and can have 10 crew for 8 passengers.

Lalamanzi is a St Francis 44 cat, crewed by a couple from South Africa, heading home across the Pacific and Indian Oceans.

And finally, Belle Ourse (Pretty Bear) wins my prize for the best name.   She hails from Montreal.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.  And the grand total is . . . a lot of dough!  But while I’m looking over the fence at stuff owned by the Vanderbilts of our era,  I encourage you to read this thoroughly fascinating article about a private jet broker, Steve Varsano, who sells to the same social segment as can afford these yachts.

 

GWA stands “go[ing] west again,”  the next set of posts all attempting to catch myself and maybe you up, if you’re following along, with random and I hope interesting photos from the past almost three weeks.  I realize that catching up is impossible, and in this case while I had vacated the sixth boro, big stuff happened.

A word that comes to mind is protean– named for Proteus.  Type “define: protean” into google and you’ll appreciate why it’s difficult to catch up.  But here goes.

Within a half hour of departing Warren RI, we pass Naema and

Lionheart.  Do check the links.  Either would be worthy of a post in itself.

And still north of the Rte 138 bridge, we see NOAA R/V Henry B Bigelow.

On the cusp of Block Island Sound, we encounter inbound Atlantic Pioneer, where you’d expect her returning from a run. Here’s a post I did almost exactly two years ago when Atlantic Pioneer components still needed to be combined at the shipyard.

A bit further, it’s Carol Jean and Islander, both Block Island bound, although one will arrive much before the other.

By now, we’re into Long Island Sound and being overtaken by darkness.  That’s Atlantic Navigator II as a speck heading toward us.

This dawn photo found us within NYC and approaching the East river.  It’s Fort Totten, designed for the entire US by Robert E Lee.  Here could be a dilemma:  there’s no debate that I know of of striking his name from the credits for this fort.

We pass HuntsPoint Produce Market,

the floating pool,

Marty C–a Weeks tug I’ve never seen,

the “north end” of Roosevelt Island with the Blackwell Island Light,

Gabby L Miller pushing past Cornell Tech‘s yet-to-be used buildings,

the Brooklyn Navy yard with Asphalt Sailor and –I believe– the old Great Point,

swimmers in the water doing a Manhattan circumnatation,

and–let’s end it here for today–a yacht  named  Vava II.  Here’s info on her owner.

Protean  . . . day 1?  It’s not even over, and I think so.

Lots more to come.

 

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