You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Liberty Clipper’ tag.

A decade ago I rode Condor and saw close up the start of the 23rd running of the great! Chesapeake Schooner race.  Covid intervened for a few years and actually changed the format;  now there’s a Bay Race, which begins today, and a virtual race, fund raiser.

In 2012, the starting boat also raised its tugantine sails after all the schooners had passed /checked in at the starting line.

There were too boats many to reprise here, but A. J. Meerwald sailed, as 

did Lady Maryland.  She and Meerwald appeared on this blog way back in 2007 on a foggy summer day.

The Colvin design is evident with Cuchulain. Here’s more on Thomas E. Colvin.

Virginia and Pride of Baltimore II run side by side before the race.

Liberty Clipper and a yawl I’ve never managed to identify pass. I never realized until now that Liberty Clipper was Blount built.

Sultana is a replica of a pre-Revolutionary War  topsail schooner.

Summerwind is no replica;  she’s 1929 Thomaston ME built for a banker just before the October 1929 Crash.

 

Before raising their own sails, the crew of the tugantine shares a libation with the old man of the sea bay.

Then it was tugantine tanbark sails raised and off they scudded to the south end of the Bay.

All photos, WVD, who would love to reprise this race in 2023 . . .

Rake refers to mast slant from perpendicular relative to forward and aft.  Generally, a mast is raked aft of plumb, although in many seas masts are raked forward.  Raking the masts of a sailing vessel, one step of tuning a rig,  ideally serves to balance the center of effort.   The rake here on Liberty Clipper is accentuated by the “perpendicularity” of the buildings over in Jersey City.  Foto taken in October.  Serious sailors and naval architects can talk at length about rake.

Pride of Baltimore II also has seriously

raked masts.  So does Spirit of Bermuda, as seen here back in September.  As do Amistad  and Amazon.

Ditto schooner America.

On power ships, stacks are often raked, although this seems to be  about style.  To rake or not is a “first chicken or first egg” questions of ship design.  Cangarda has a single raked funnel.  Earlier steam vessels appeared to have perpendicular stacks.

Buoys, on the other hand, should not be “raked” this much and on only one side of the channel.  Something amiss here is.

Unrelated:  Some three years back bowsprite took these fotos and gave momentum to my whatzit series.  Here‘s how that “short ship” looks today, just before a radical transformation into something “tall.”

Also unrelated but getting some attention these days, tugster ran this post of Giulio Verne six plus weeks ago.  NYTimes ran this story yesterday, and adds delightful onboard info.

I’m still in Georgia, craving salt water, completing unfinished blog posts when the spirit moves me.

A yawl?  Know the name?

I can’t help with the name, but it looks fun and wet.  It raced today as part of the New York Classic.

The competition seemed fierce.

Slower, but more stately, it’s Pride of Baltimore 2, who’s gone east as far as Lunenburg and west as far as Duluth this summer.

Scarano’s Adirondack here

trails America 2.0.

K-Sea’s Maryland has enough house to qualify as sail.  Here Maryland meets Shearwater.

Clipper City is the larger sailing vessel here.

And Liberty Clipper . . . I don’t know her story.  She breezed in yesterday but was not in the race today . . . Saturday.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,568 other followers
If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Documentary "Graves of Arthur Kill" is AVAILABLE again here.Click here to buy now!

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

December 2022
M T W T F S S
 1234
567891011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031