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Note that I had to retitle yesterday’s post, because I had posted a “seven seas 2” two years ago already.  A conversation this week prompts yesterday’s and today’s post:  the K-Sea fleet in the sixth boro has been changing since their acquisition by Kirby last year.  But as Isaac Asimov and Heraclitus each in his own way said . . . shift happens.    For example, twenty years ago there was no K-Sea.  It emerged in 1993 out of Eklof, which had existed in the harbor since 1910.  In 2008, K-Sea itself absorbed Roehrig.

Anyhow, I decided to see what K-Sea units I’ve taken fotos of in the past half year, and here they are.  Big caveat . . .  I’m not out there around the sixth boro every day or even most days AND I don’t foto everything I see.  A webcam might do that, but although my interest is documenting, I value an attempt at aesthetic pleasure as well, and webcams can’t do that.

So here goes:  Lincoln Sea departed here yesterday, but no foto.  Jan 8 . . . Norwegian Sea

McKinley Sea . . . Dec. 4.

Davis Sea . . . also Dec. 4.

Barents Sea . . . Dec. 2.

Aegean Sea . . .  Nov. 15.

Java Sea . . . Nov. 6.

Maryland . . . Oct. 23.

Viking . . . Oct 16.

North Sea . . . Sept. 20

Ross Sea . . . Sept. 4.

and Baltic Sea, this morning . . . docked along Badagry Creek, Lagos.

Again, I’m making no claims that these are the only K-Sea boats around . . . just that these are the ones I’ve taken fotos of in the past half year.   A quick search on AIS today shows Inland Sea and Houma in Philly; Odin, North Sea, and Volunteer around the Gulf of Mexico, and all others . . . maybe  . .  at sea.

OOoops . .  there was a “seven seas 2” already here.  Here was the first in this series.  Today’s post stems from my inability to identify a very distant K-Sea tug in the second foto here; thanks to Jed and Harold for setting me straight.  K-Sea units that used to be commonplace in the sixth boro are in fact scattered to the seven “seas”:  Gulf of Mexico, Gulf of Alaska, Gulf of Guinea.   So I decided to post today all the white K-Sea tugs I’ve foto’d in the past half month.  There is the new infusion of green K-Sea units, too. Of course, other units have passed through the harbor;  these are just the ones I’ve seen.  After all, I do have other claims on my time.  For the K-Sea story and ALL their units, past and present, check out Birk and Harold’s fantastic site here.

Solomon Sea, passing Barbara McAllister,

Davis Sea, on our only snow storm to date,

Greenland Sea,

Beaufort Sea, 

and Bering Sea. 

Some units are parked at Mariner’s Harbor, and the profitable ones that I didn’t see during this period must be where they should be:  at sea!

If your reading this post from WAY outside the sixth boro and sight a K-Sea vessel and you COULD snap a foto to send along, I’ll post it in a “far-flung” post.

But first, bowsprite’s talked about her online art store for some time, and yesterday . . . officially, she launched it.    Please traffic it.  I wouldn’t want her till to look like the one I found along the KVK yesterday.  See the jam-packed cash drawer below.  Come spring it might be full of green.

I love it when traffic in the KVK is dense:  here (l. to r.) Mediterranean Sea, Siberian Sea (?), Margaret Moran, and Cosco Tianjin.   In the distance is Robbins Reef Light and the old Williamsburgh Savings Bank tower in Brooklyn.

Dubai Express, Austin Reinauer, and Brendan Turecamo.   Invisible on the starboard side of Dubai is James Turecamo.

Here a small Triple S Marine (Aren’t they based in Louisiana?) boat bounces past Lucy Reinauer.

APL Japan, Elizabeth McAllister, Marion Moran, and McAllister Sisters . . . I believe, with the Brooklyn skyline in the distance.

Meagan Ann and OOCL Norfolk . . . with cables of the Brooklyn and Manhattan Bridges in the distance.

Sea Lion pushes a barge of equipment ahead of MOL Endurance.

Among the pieces of equipment on this Mobro barge, what intrigued me was this Caterpillar designed to operate in wet places.

Finally for now . . . Beaufort Sea tails Maria J and Frederick E. Bouchard.

With traffic this heavy, I can see bowsprite will be very busy drawing and sketching while the robots staff the store.   Or maybe she could have robotos out sketching while she keeps the rust off her cash register?

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was SWC 1, and before that there was watercolor 4 (thanks to a burst of sunshine) and 3, 2, and 1 . . . you can seek out if you wish using the search window to the left.

What strikes me about the foto below is how hard it is to distinguish where metal ends and water starts.  Also, the black streaks on paint caused by docks and tugs in ports literally around the watery parts of the globe create a variation on the accidental beauty of Jackson Pollock.

The real beauty is in the water.  By definition it doesn’t exist.  It’s manufactured only

by the camera;  otherwise, it couldn’t be shared this way.  The top vessel was MOL Endurance; this is Twinkle Express.

These rusty love bites are pretty, but if were sailing this, I’d like to have a metallurgist’s reassurance.

The fendering here always reminds me of baleen.

Sunny days on the water always give me joy.  Nearer here is Barbara E. Bouchard with Capt. Fred Bouchard in background, and here

on a glassy Upper Bay is a fairly new Maersk Katarina.

In contrast . . .  fotos taken same day of Manistee off Detroit.  Maybe these are freshwater colors, the non-uniform

shades of gray normally associated with January.

Many thanks to Ken of Michigan Exposures for the counterpoint winter shots.  Today is the last day of January and it’s in the mid-50s!!  Someone told me this morning we’d better watch out in February because lots of snow’s been piling up in the sky ready to surprise and catch us up.

All sixth boro fotos by Will Van Dorp, last Saturday.

 

This short dozen tugboats chosen because they passed on a given part of a morning recently differ in size, age, tasks, and number of fleet siblings.  Less visible are their differing histories and crews.

Laura K Moran, 2008 built in Maine 87′ loa and 5100 hp here escorting in Ever Devote.  Below her is Caitlin Ann, built in Louisiana in 1961.  70′ loa and 2400 hp.

Vane’s Bohemia and Quantico Creek differ in many respects:  2007 v. 2010, 4200 v. 3000, Louisiana v. Maryland, and 96′ v. 90′ loa.

Below them, escorting Dubai Express,  is James Turecamo, 1969 built in NY, 92′ loa and 2000 hp.

Greenland Sea, built in Louisiana in 1990, 4200 hp and 112′ loa.

Below her is Barbara McAllister, 1969 built in Louisiana, 100 loa and 4000 hp.

Charles D. McAllister, 1967 built in Florida, 1800 hp and 94′ loa.

Margaret Moran, shown twice escorting Cosco Tianjin, 1979 built in Louisiana, 99′ loa and 3000 hp.

Two former SeaBoats tugs are now Mediterranean Sea and Weddell Sea, both built in Massachusetts and powered by 4500 hp.  Mediterranean Sea (110′ loa)  was launched in 2004; Weddell Sea  (105′ loa) launched 2007.

Finally, it’s Nicole Leigh Reinauer, Alabama-built, launched in 1999, 119′ loa, and 7200 hp.

All fotos this week by Will Van Dorp.

So  . . . the bright sunshine and 45+ degree temperature coaxed me out to take some fotos, and soon I’m having a conversation with a gentleman whose first thought was wind power device was deck-mounted equipment on the reddish tanker.  Clearly here . . .  t-o-w-e-r   rhymes with power and not lawn mower.  I’m guessing it to be the tallest structure in Bayonne.    Any idea what Manhattan’s first skyscraper was and where?  It lasted only three years (1853–6) before it burnt down.

It’s definitely land-based.  But I thought I could have some fun creating

some alternative-powered shipping, like a wind turbine barge  DoubleSkin 303.

How about a Jane A. Bouchard with a huge air prop, or

this on an extra-tall Quantico Creek?

Ditto Greenland Sea?

Or a turbine atop the tower of the newly-minted Mediterranean Sea?

Closer up, this is what the hub looks like.

Some of the parts are US-made;  others come from Austria.  Here are some introductory  technical details.  If I read Leitwind’s homepage correctly, this is their first turbine delivered to the US.  Here are even more technical details, again from a New Jersey publication.

Northern New York state has a surprisingly large number of such turbines, as documented in tugster here, and “salties” have been delivering components into the upper Midwest through the St. Lawrence and into the Great Lakes, as Marlene Green, shown here . . . although I caught her running empty.  The five states that currently have the highest percentage of their electric power generated by turbine are:  Iowa, the Dakotas, Minnesota, and Kansas.  Atlantic City has five turbines.  Are there others in NJ?  And Staten Island . . . the idea of wind turbines atop Fresh Kills has certainly been discussed.

As of this writing, I’ve not seen any NY papers mention the Bayonne tower.  Hmm.

Oh, the first “skyscraper”  was Latting Observatory, standing 315 feet.  To learn more, click here.   This bit of erudition comes compliments of Tom Flagg, who is also responsible for this great but maybe slow-loading document of the bygone era of marine rail on the west side of Manhattan.  Thanks, Tom.

Friday afternoon I timed a foray on the harbor perfectly with respect to light.  Here’s a previous “golden hour” post, from over four years ago.   And although I’m not a literalist with much, the “hour” the other afternoon lasted less than 20 minutes.

16:24 . . .  guided by the new wind turbine, Hanjin Albany and two unidentified tugs catch the beginning of the gilded light. I’m not sure what Hanjin Albany carried in or intends to carry out.

16:25 . . .  in a different area of the Upper Bay, APL Turquoise and Charles D. McAllister (or is it McAllister Responder??) have not quite entered that enhancing light.

16:37 . . . same APL Turquoise and Charles D. (I’ll assume) are now fully adorned in gold.   Solomon Sea pushes a set of scows with golden sand.

Too short this light lasts;  in 30 minutes it’ll be winter night.

16:36 . . . Giulio Verne in a different part of the harbor bathe in lesser amounts of this light.

Solomon Sea‘s sand piles could not be more embellished.

But by 16:42 . . . the brilliance diminishes already unless

here, at 16:42 and beyond Staten Island’s shadow, Samuel I. Newhouse and RBM 45612, still linger in the golden light.

All fotos during this 18-minute interval, by Will Van Dorp.

Wow!  Almost 40 years ago, another 18-minute unit was significant.

Late first snow this season unless you count the few flurries over the sixth boro last October, but flakes did obscure vision this morning.   Of course, Cheyenne is always recognizeable and busy, but Arabian Sea (in green) I had to guess at.

Laurie Ann Reinauer  . . . well, I could read the name on her derriere.

But Barbara McAllister I had to guess at.  (Harold corrects me . . .it’s Amy C. McAllister.  Thanks, Harold.) Snow flakes just blocked out the name.

Franklin . . . I know the profile AND can read the name even with my cokebottle glasses.

But I was looking for a good 10 minutes at this right in front of me and did not even SEE it.  No, not Sanko Blossom, but that new feature beyond her . . . that light colored structure obscured

now and again by a squall.  It wasn’t there a few days ago.

It’s good for my self-confidence that I saw the tower yesterday also, and got fotos of the 260′ tower then, over beyond Hanjin Albany.   Otherwise I might have suspected it came with the storm.   The blades weren’t turning, though, in spite of the wind, since it won’t go operational for a month or so yet. 

All fotos by Will Van Dorp, who’s already wondering if Bayonne can be convinced to put bright colorful lights on the tower next December.

Thomas D. Witte . . . I did nothing to manipulate this image, no liquification, no DAP . . .

Yet another Mighty Servant 1 foto with four movers of the Miller’s Launch fleet.    As of this writing, the Mighty is still anchored at the Narrows.  Bravo on what appears to have been a flawless loading.

Gustav Schulte passes the loading on a very slow bell, partly because of the tow happening off its port bow also.

I’m not sure what this tow is . . . Sea Lion (?) and a thousand feet tailing it.  The tail boat may be Iron Wolf.    Can anyone help?

December means fishing on the sixth boro . . . here’s a newcomer for me . . . Mary Virginia (ex-Maazee).

Irish Sea moves a barge into the Bay.

Eagle Baltimore and Liechtenstein swing on the hook.

Crystal Cutler does too.

Shearwater motors out the east end of KVK headed, I believe, for North Cove.

Crystal Marie exits the Narrows.

Happy last day of Fall 2011.

All fotos by Will Van Dorp.  And this just in . . . as of noon today, Mighty Servant 1 exited the Bay Nigeria-bound.  I hope the good folks on Meagan Ann get a foto they will share.

Maria J. Turecamo (1968)  and Hercules  (1961), side by side, and my psychic tells me Hercules may be about to set out on a long cold journey, over water.   Given the name, I’m inclined to wonder what Hercules 12 labors were/are and where on that list this journey fits.

Scott Turecamo (1998) and

Reinauer Twins (2011) wait with their respective barges.  Twins holds the distinction of being the newest tug in the sixth boro.

Norwegian Sea (1976) waits, but

Meredith C. Reinauer (2003) is on the move, as

is McKinley Sea (1981).

And most of them could carry Augie on davits as a tender.  Anyone know the age of Augie, here at a dock upriver?

Finally, another foto of Byrce Kirk operating Patty Nolan (1931) and still running.

Foto of Augie by Dave Williams, Patty Nolan by Seth Tane, and all others by Will Van Dorp.

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