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 . .  but first, I know I missed lots of excitement in the sixth boro this morning.  If anyone got photos, I’d love to share them here for folks who don’t do FB.  Now let’s head a few years back and down on the Chesapeake in Baltimore. . . 

Sea Crescent . .  .  I believe she’s a 1981 Stevens Towing vessel, currently in Narragansett Bay.  I took this photo near Annapolis.

The 1970 Capt. Henry Knott operates for Vulcan Marine Services. She’s currently in norfolk. 

In the foreground, it’s the 1975 Indian Dawn, formerly Sea Star at Spentonbush-Red Star in the sixth boro. My notes fail me on the tug beyond the scow. 

Now inside Baltimore, it’s Bridget McAllister. The 2006 tug was built as Leo for Foss and worked at one time under that name for Constellation Maritime, as seen here

Also in Baltimore it’s the 1966 YTB now known as Timothy McAllister. Like Ellen and Steven McAllister, she brings 4000 horses to the job. 

 

Harriet Moran is a 1978 Jakobson tugboat that was heavily modified in the 1990s.

James R. Moran is a 2004 Washburn & Doughty tractor, rated at 5000 hp. John W. Brown is one of the last remaining Liberty ships, off the ways in Baltimore in 1942.  In that link, you see her in the sixth boro in 2016.

Rounding out the Moran fleet I saw in 2017, it’s April Moran and Z-One. They are from 2006 and 1996, respectively, and both rated at 5100 hp. I first ran into Z-One in San Juan, here

Now out of Baltimore and headed for the C & D Canal, I ran into the 1981 Skiffs Creek Towing vessel Justin, with a loaded barge. 

All photos, WVD. 

Enjoy this sampling of boats and the dates associated with their launch starting from Arabian Sea (2007) on Dry Dock No. 7,

Stephen Reinauer (1970) nearby on 4,

Miss Circle Line . . . (1954 as ST 2124 and later Betsy) ,

Alex McAllister (1985),

Joyce D. Brown (2002) headed home after completing the daily chores,

Crystal Coast (1983) and Justin (1981) heading south into the Chesapeake,

JRT Moran (2016) holding onto an argosy,

Ivory Coast (1967) waiting on the next job,

All photos by Will Van Dorp (1952).

Unrelated, for a long interpretation of Moby Dick (1851) and connections between “grammar school literature” like the Odyssea (est. 1000 BCE) and All Quiet on the Western Front (1929) and connections with folk songs, listen to Bob Dylan (1941) making his Nobel Prize acceptance speech (2017)  here . . .  It’s the best 27 minutes of listening you’ll do today, I believe.

 

Actually, only part of this leg is through the ICW, or another way to say this is that from Cape May to NYC you need to be in the ocean.  For a map that shows this, click here. This leg takes us from Baltimore to New York City, which in this case is not the end of the trip.  More on that later.

Below, Key’s Anthem is Baltimore’s new Inner Harbor water taxi, the first vessel of 10, one that’s all local vernacular . . . a Hooper’s Island drake tail.

Tiwai Point prepares to discharge a load of sugar, from Colombia, I think . . .

Bridget McAllister (and other McAllister boats) waits at the dock.

We head out past Natty Boh and Brooklyn . . . ,

Vane’s Carlyn,

and Justin with an unidentified load.

Was it Justin that towed Tamaroa out to the reef site last week?

At the Chesapeake side of the C & D Canal, it’s Dann Ocean’s home base, with (l to r) First Coast, Diamond Coast, New England Coast, Sea Coast, and Gold Coast.  By the way, Gallatin called this the Delaware & Chesapeake Canal and estimated it as 22 miles long with 18 locks.  The current Chesapeake & Delaware is 14 miles long and all water is at sea level, i.e., no locks.  Here’s the history.

Defender (I think) steams inbound for Pennsauken with Cape Cod tailing a Crowley barge.  Depending on which barge this was, capacity is 400–500 teus.

Gulf Venture/Carrier anchors off Salem . . .

And then morning brings a jagged island up out from the deeps and we

line up some towers . . . while Le Grand Bleu waits in Gravesend Bay.

Note the unusual wake and splash pattern on Jonathan C.‘s stern?

And an unfamiliar Kirby vessel– Mount St. Elias–moves DBL 77 upriver.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

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