You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Joan Turecamo’ tag.

By the numbers today, Daisy Mae,  launched in late 2017 and generating 3200 hp.

Joyce D. Brown, built 2002 and 2600 hp.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969 and 2000.

James E. Brown, 2015 and 1000.

Dean Reinauer, 2013 and 4260.

Andrea, 1999 and 3000.

Elizabeth McAllister, 1967 and 4000.

Ellen McAllister, also 1967 and 4000.

Kimberley Turecamo, 1980 and 3000.

Joan Turecamo, 1980 and 4300.

Joan Moran, 1975 and 4300.

Miss Ila, 1962 and 2400.

All photos by Will Van Dorp; all numbers from tugboat information.

 

I’m happy to lead with two photos Lydia Wong took last September when CMA CGM T. Roosevelt arrived on her first voyage into the sixth boro.  Like “new car smell” T. Roos carried an atypically uniform CMA CGM container load, at least along the edges; they’re ALL blue.

When Lydia took these, I was somewhere on Lake Michigan or its edges.  Since then, T. Roos arrived three more times, but it happened in the dark hours, or I was either away or distracted.

So last week, I was ready to camp out just to get these photos.  A camp out was unnecessary, the weather was mild, and –although cloudy–the light was not half bad.

First thing I noticed was the typical mosaic of container color, mostly non-CMA CGM.

Joan and JRT pushed her stern around Bergen Point

while James pulled on the bow;

Margaret did what all was needed on the starboard side.

For comparison, here’s a post I did a little over a year ago of a smaller CMA CGM vessel rounding this bend.

 

Traffic was light, so I got onto Brooklyn turf before she cleared the Narrows.

CMA CGM’s fleet of 74 ULCS, i.e., ultra large container ship, one carrying more than 10,000 boxes, ranks it third;  currently the largest fleet of ULCS is MSC (90), with Maersk in second place with 86 ULCS.  Here’s more detail on those numbers.

Thanks to Lydia for use of her photos.  All others by Will Van Dorp, who can’t help but imagine that ULCS must be a near-rhyme with “hulks” in its gargantuan meaning.

 

 

Here are previous installments.  And here are names and numbers of all who have all paraded in front of my lens recently.

Amy Moran, 1973, 3000hp

Joan Turecamo, 1980, 4300.

James D. Moran, 2015, 6000.

Jonathan C. Moran, 2016, 6000.

Marie J Turecamo 1968 and 2250, and James Turecamo 1969 2000 or 1800 or 1700

Marion Moran 1982 and 3000 4610

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

I don’t care that it’s February, but the number of subsequent days with temperatures over 50 degrees in the sixth bor0 tells me it is spring–or has been.

dscf3201

Notice the difference between Severn and Fort Schuyler?  Here proximity highlights the difference in height of the upper wheelhouse,

dscf3223

but Severn is of the 4200 hp class and fort Schuyler, the 3000.

dscf3224

Ah, the line and boom boats.

dscf3225

Joan is one of the Moran “giraffe” boats and see HR Otter?

dscf3075

She reminds me of the long gone Odin.

dscf3076

 

dscf3073

Here’s a closer-up of the HR Otter, a name that immediately conjures up Kenneth Grahame.

dscf3081

 

dscf3202

Some different pairs are possible here, and they’d be the same.

pairs

See the pair there?

pairs2

a pair of hands.  Is there a word for the painted design centered on the bow of some vessels, like figureheads but not?

pairs3

Hope they clap for mardi gras!

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

I’ve written about summertime and about summertime blues–about beating them.  But since you can’t ever step into the same river twice, or gallivant in the same primordial first boro, here’s the 2016 version of trying to capture the sixth boro with a camera on a hot summer weekend afternoon, looking for shade–any shade will do– as much as looking for novel compositions.

sb1

These days odd juxtapositions can be found on west Manhattan piers and

sb2

beyond, like Eagle and the fast bird and Loveland Island with a pilot on board and some folks gathered on the starboard bridge wing .  For a post I did last year with close-ups of details of USCGC Eagle AND for a book I highly recommend reading about her appropriate by the US post-WW2, click here.  Speaking of piers, here’s an interesting article on the engineering and construction of Pier 57.

sb3

Or come for a tour on Janet D Cruises . . .

sb4

with four sails set.

sb5

Long Beach comes to Bayonne along with a Celebrity ship and a PWC . . . pesky workless canoe?

sb7

Flagship Ivy clings for a spell to the bottom over by the VZ Bridge.

sb8

Margaret Moran heads for the next job–or the yard, with Queens’ current and future tallest buildings in the background,

sb9

while YP 704 sails past Governors Island, which has sprouted some new hillocks frequented by lots of people.

sb6

Joan Turecamo exits the Buttermilk west with a light (?) dry bulk barge Montville, which probably recently carried coal.

sb10

All photos Sunday by Will Van Dorp.  for some contrast, see this winter set and this.   More of the summer selects, tomorrow.

 

Let’s start with Marie J. Turecamo (1968).  And then let’s look at others out around this springtime morning:

0art7

Like Joan Turecamo (1980), built near the confluence of the Hudson River and Erie Canal,

0art999

heading out here with James D. Moran (2015);

0art2

Caitlin Ann (1961) doing a recycling run;

0art1

Emerald Coast (1973) leaving the U-Haul;

0art3

North Sea (1982) heading for the Kirby yard;

0art4

Robert E. McAllister (1969) heading out for a ship;

0art5

Quenames (1982) moving a barge alongside;

0art6

Crystal Cutler (2010) getting some maintenance; and

0art6b

that brings us back to Marie J. Turecamo and a photo taken only a minute of so before the lead-off photo in this post.

0art7b

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

November, port month on tugster, ends here, making this GHP&W 30.  Here’s how the month began.  One thing I learned putting together this post is that Port Richmond and Mariner’s Harbor appear not to share a border, at least according to the wikipedia map.  Between the western edge of Port Richmond and the eastern edge of Mariner’s (the west side of the Bayonne Bridge) is a neighborhood called Elm Park.  I’d never heard of it.  Also, look at the northeast tip of Port Richmond . . . it’s in the water only and includes the Caddell yard.  Furthermore, Port Richmond never seems like much of a port if you see it by road only.  Click here for photos of the land portion of Port Richmond.  Click on the map to make it interactive.

0aappr

A google satellite view shows the northernmost margin of land is port-intensive.  Click here for many vintage photos of Port Richmond, pre-Bayonne Bridge, back when Port Richmond was a major ferry/rail link.

portrichaerial

Although the late fall midday sun backlit these shots, let’s cruise the waterside of Port Richmond, starting at its northeastern point, where the Wavertree (1885) project is ongoing.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Delaware River & Bay Authority’s Delaware is undergoing some major repowering work. 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Frying Pan . . . light of the night vessel from up at Pier 66 is having some work done.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In the belly of Frying Pan, where the engine and machinery used to be, a night club sometimes comes to life.    Click here for some renderings of the vessel by the elusive bowsprite.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Miss Liberty, built 1954, is nearly finished with this dry-docking.  Notice here she is high and dry?  Well, just 45 minutes later, she had been

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

splashed and was being towed to a wharf by Caddell’s own L. W. Caddell (1990).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Continuing to the west, it’s the yards of Reinauer and Moran. From l to r, here, it seems to be Meredith C. Reinauer (2003), Laurie Ann Reinauer (2009), Reinauer Twins (2011), and Dace Reinauer (1968 but JUST repowered). . . and Joan Turecamo with (?) Brendan Turecamo.  The McAllister tug between the Reinauer ATBs . . . I’ll guess is Bruce A. Marjorie B. McAllister.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This photo, taken a half hour earlier and before Joan Turecamo (1980) tied up, shows Kimberly Turecamo (1980), the very new and beamy  J. R. T. Moran (2015), and Brendan (1975).

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

On the west side of the Moran yard, it’s Cable Queen (1952).  Click here for photos of this cable-layer at work through the years.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And for the last shot of Port Richmond–although this may be straying westward into Elm Park waters, it’s Metropolitan Marine Transportation’s newest Normandy.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All the photos today by Will Van Dorp.

So as I said at the beginning of this post, so ends the “gunk holes, harbors, ports, and wharves” series.  However, precedent on this blog makes it really easy to do a Port Richmond 2, 3, 4 . . . . etc. post.  also, if any of you feel like contributing a set of photos from a port of gunk hole, no matter how large or obscure, I welcome it.  Besides, there’s always then possibility of doing an “upland” version of any port, focusing on land-based businesses serving the work vessels.

And as for December, let me reprint this idea for a December theme:

How about  antique/classic workboats, functioning or wrecked.  Of course, a definition for that category is impossible.  For example, NewYorkBoater says this:  ‘The definition of an antique boat according to Antique and Classic Boating Society is a boat built between 1919 and 1942.  A classic was built between 1943 and 1975 and the term contemporary, are boats built from 1976 and on.’  Hmm . . . what do you call an old vessel built before 1919 . . . a restoration project?  antediluvian?

If you take another transportation sector–automobiles, you get another definition:  25 years old or more.    And for the great race, here were the rules for this year:  “Vehicle entries must have been manufactured in 1972 or before.”  Next year’s cut-off will likely be 1973.

So my flexible definition is  . . . photo should have been taken in 1999 or before, by you or of you or a family member, and in the case of a wreck, probably identifiable.  Exception . . .  it could be a boat built before  . . . say  . . . 1965.”

Many thanks to all of you who sent along photos, contributed ideas, and commented in November.

Here are the previous posts in this series.  In today’s post, one word appears in every photo.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

That word–Neutrino— seemed unlikely, given its New York harbor context.  Some of you might remember Town Hall and Son of Town Hall, creations of Poppa Neutrino, inhabitants of Pier 25 a mere few decades ago.

It was all before my time here.  But if you have stories and/or photos, please share them.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Guess the locations here and . . .

0aaaaaart

here?  Answers follow.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

This one should be obvious.  What’s the Philly-bound tug?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

It’s Lucky D.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Here’s Chesapeake Coast, probably North River and then Hudson River bound.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

B. Franklin Reinauer is Sound-bound.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

And some light tugs . . . Elizabeth,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Joan Turecamo,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Chesapeake,

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Megan McAllister, 

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

. . . Margaret Moran and Pegasus.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The top two were . . . locations were Chao Phraya River in Bangkok and the Staten Island side of the Narrows, with tug Gulf Dawn outbound.   Click here for some Thai tugs from almost seven years ago.  Thanks much to Ashley Hutto for the first photo.

Here was the first time I used this title, which clearly needs to be used again.

Let me start here at 13:38.  Note from far to near, or black hull to black hull . . . Cartagena, Four Sky with Lee T Moran, Red Hook, and Genco Knight.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Twin Tube slides through the opening between Bow Kiso and Genco Knight.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Even the bow of Genco Knight is crowded as their vessel prepares to dock and resupply the salt depot.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Kimberly Turecamo works the bulk carrier’s stern as Evening Star passes with B. No. 250.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Add McAllister Girls in the foreground and Ellen McAllister in the distance against the blue hull, which will appear a bit later.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

McCrews heads westbound and Four Sky now seems to be doing the same.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Are you out of breath yet?  Only 10 minutes has elapsed.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Linehandler 1 cruises blithely through it, supremely self-assured.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Cheyenne adds color.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Another line handler boat scouts out the set up . . . as a new blue hull arrives from the west, as

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

. .  . does Charles D. McAllister.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Crew on the blue hull–Nord Observer–stows lines as they head for tropical heat, escorted

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

by Catherine Turecamo although

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

at the turn on the Con Hook range they meet Mare Pacific heading in with Joan Turecamo and Margaret  Moran.  At this point . . .

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

14:12 . . .  the mergansers decided to hightail it . . . or at least follow their crests.  And I hadn’t even turned around yet to see the congestion on land behind me.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

All these photos in a very short time by Will Van Dorp.

My thanks to Brian DeForest and Atlantic Salt, whom Genco Knight was arriving to restock.

Here was a post about a dense traffic day as well as a busy day.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,256 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

December 2018
M T W T F S S
« Nov    
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31