You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘Joan Turecamo’ tag.

Let’s start with Marie J. Turecamo (1968).  And then let’s look at others out around this springtime morning:

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Like Joan Turecamo (1980), built near the confluence of the Hudson River and Erie Canal,

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heading out here with James D. Moran (2015);

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Caitlin Ann (1961) doing a recycling run;

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Emerald Coast (1973) leaving the U-Haul;

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North Sea (1982) heading for the Kirby yard;

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Robert E. McAllister (1969) heading out for a ship;

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Quenames (1982) moving a barge alongside;

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Crystal Cutler (2010) getting some maintenance; and

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that brings us back to Marie J. Turecamo and a photo taken only a minute of so before the lead-off photo in this post.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp.

November, port month on tugster, ends here, making this GHP&W 30.  Here’s how the month began.  One thing I learned putting together this post is that Port Richmond and Mariner’s Harbor appear not to share a border, at least according to the wikipedia map.  Between the western edge of Port Richmond and the eastern edge of Mariner’s (the west side of the Bayonne Bridge) is a neighborhood called Elm Park.  I’d never heard of it.  Also, look at the northeast tip of Port Richmond . . . it’s in the water only and includes the Caddell yard.  Furthermore, Port Richmond never seems like much of a port if you see it by road only.  Click here for photos of the land portion of Port Richmond.  Click on the map to make it interactive.

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A google satellite view shows the northernmost margin of land is port-intensive.  Click here for many vintage photos of Port Richmond, pre-Bayonne Bridge, back when Port Richmond was a major ferry/rail link.

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Although the late fall midday sun backlit these shots, let’s cruise the waterside of Port Richmond, starting at its northeastern point, where the Wavertree (1885) project is ongoing.

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Delaware River & Bay Authority’s Delaware is undergoing some major repowering work. 

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Frying Pan . . . light of the night vessel from up at Pier 66 is having some work done.

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In the belly of Frying Pan, where the engine and machinery used to be, a night club sometimes comes to life.    Click here for some renderings of the vessel by the elusive bowsprite.

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Miss Liberty, built 1954, is nearly finished with this dry-docking.  Notice here she is high and dry?  Well, just 45 minutes later, she had been

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splashed and was being towed to a wharf by Caddell’s own L. W. Caddell (1990).

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Continuing to the west, it’s the yards of Reinauer and Moran. From l to r, here, it seems to be Meredith C. Reinauer (2003), Laurie Ann Reinauer (2009), Reinauer Twins (2011), and Dace Reinauer (1968 but JUST repowered). . . and Joan Turecamo with (?) Brendan Turecamo.  The McAllister tug between the Reinauer ATBs . . . I’ll guess is Bruce A. Marjorie B. McAllister.

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This photo, taken a half hour earlier and before Joan Turecamo (1980) tied up, shows Kimberly Turecamo (1980), the very new and beamy  J. R. T. Moran (2015), and Brendan (1975).

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On the west side of the Moran yard, it’s Cable Queen (1952).  Click here for photos of this cable-layer at work through the years.

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And for the last shot of Port Richmond–although this may be straying westward into Elm Park waters, it’s Metropolitan Marine Transportation’s newest Normandy.

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All the photos today by Will Van Dorp.

So as I said at the beginning of this post, so ends the “gunk holes, harbors, ports, and wharves” series.  However, precedent on this blog makes it really easy to do a Port Richmond 2, 3, 4 . . . . etc. post.  also, if any of you feel like contributing a set of photos from a port of gunk hole, no matter how large or obscure, I welcome it.  Besides, there’s always then possibility of doing an “upland” version of any port, focusing on land-based businesses serving the work vessels.

And as for December, let me reprint this idea for a December theme:

How about  antique/classic workboats, functioning or wrecked.  Of course, a definition for that category is impossible.  For example, NewYorkBoater says this:  ‘The definition of an antique boat according to Antique and Classic Boating Society is a boat built between 1919 and 1942.  A classic was built between 1943 and 1975 and the term contemporary, are boats built from 1976 and on.’  Hmm . . . what do you call an old vessel built before 1919 . . . a restoration project?  antediluvian?

If you take another transportation sector–automobiles, you get another definition:  25 years old or more.    And for the great race, here were the rules for this year:  “Vehicle entries must have been manufactured in 1972 or before.”  Next year’s cut-off will likely be 1973.

So my flexible definition is  . . . photo should have been taken in 1999 or before, by you or of you or a family member, and in the case of a wreck, probably identifiable.  Exception . . .  it could be a boat built before  . . . say  . . . 1965.”

Many thanks to all of you who sent along photos, contributed ideas, and commented in November.

Here are the previous posts in this series.  In today’s post, one word appears in every photo.

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That word–Neutrino— seemed unlikely, given its New York harbor context.  Some of you might remember Town Hall and Son of Town Hall, creations of Poppa Neutrino, inhabitants of Pier 25 a mere few decades ago.

It was all before my time here.  But if you have stories and/or photos, please share them.

All photos here by Will Van Dorp.

 

 

Guess the locations here and . . .

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here?  Answers follow.

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This one should be obvious.  What’s the Philly-bound tug?

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It’s Lucky D.

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Here’s Chesapeake Coast, probably North River and then Hudson River bound.

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B. Franklin Reinauer is Sound-bound.

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And some light tugs . . . Elizabeth,

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Joan Turecamo,

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Chesapeake,

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Megan McAllister, 

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. . . Margaret Moran and Pegasus.

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The top two were . . . locations were Chao Phraya River in Bangkok and the Staten Island side of the Narrows, with tug Gulf Dawn outbound.   Click here for some Thai tugs from almost seven years ago.  Thanks much to Ashley Hutto for the first photo.

Here was the first time I used this title, which clearly needs to be used again.

Let me start here at 13:38.  Note from far to near, or black hull to black hull . . . Cartagena, Four Sky with Lee T Moran, Red Hook, and Genco Knight.

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Twin Tube slides through the opening between Bow Kiso and Genco Knight.

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Even the bow of Genco Knight is crowded as their vessel prepares to dock and resupply the salt depot.

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Kimberly Turecamo works the bulk carrier’s stern as Evening Star passes with B. No. 250.

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Add McAllister Girls in the foreground and Ellen McAllister in the distance against the blue hull, which will appear a bit later.

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McCrews heads westbound and Four Sky now seems to be doing the same.

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Are you out of breath yet?  Only 10 minutes has elapsed.

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Linehandler 1 cruises blithely through it, supremely self-assured.

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Cheyenne adds color.

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Another line handler boat scouts out the set up . . . as a new blue hull arrives from the west, as

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. .  . does Charles D. McAllister.

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Crew on the blue hull–Nord Observer–stows lines as they head for tropical heat, escorted

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by Catherine Turecamo although

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at the turn on the Con Hook range they meet Mare Pacific heading in with Joan Turecamo and Margaret  Moran.  At this point . . .

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14:12 . . .  the mergansers decided to hightail it . . . or at least follow their crests.  And I hadn’t even turned around yet to see the congestion on land behind me.

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All these photos in a very short time by Will Van Dorp.

My thanks to Brian DeForest and Atlantic Salt, whom Genco Knight was arriving to restock.

Here was a post about a dense traffic day as well as a busy day.

Here was 8.

Do you recognize these vessels?  At the moment I write this, both are working together to escort in NYK Meteor.

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In the drydock earlier this year . . . Joan Turecamo and the other?

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This one is unmistakeable.  A year ago she was preparing to steam all night inside the sixth boro to ride out the storm.

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Click here for a foto of her in late October last year after Sandy had punished some more than others.

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From the land side, you can see some of the work recently done.

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And here from the dry side of the first shot . . .  it’s Kimberly  Turecamo and Joan.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Guess this tug?  This and alternate fotos here are taken by Seth Tane.  Answer follows.

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Joan Turecamo (1980 and one of the last tugs built at Matton in Cohoes)in the foreground.  Guess the one in the distance?

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Natoma . .  1976.

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Vessel in the distance earlier was Susan Miller, 1981.  I’m guessing the barge is loaded with riprap for shoreline protection somewhere in Raritan Bay.  I wonder about the origin of those rockaceous chunks.

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Craig Foss was launched in June 1945 as LT-648 by Tampa Marine, one of over 700 tugs operated by the US Army at the end of WW II.  For a foto of a Tampa hull, click here.

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Peering over crane barge Delaware Bay, it’s Caitlin Ann, 1961.

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It’s Shaver’s 1981-built Portland.  For a foto of a 1947 ship-assist tug Portland, click here.

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And finally . .  a tug with a tent passing a clock with no hands, it’s Miriam Moran (1979).

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Top foto is Amnav’s Revolution at the Rainier Foss shipyard in 2006.

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Left to right at the Narrows ahead of this front are Maersk Detroit, SSV Corwith Cramer, Oleander, and CMA CGM Utrillo.

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SSV Corwith Cramer is a brigantine.

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Also, racing in ahead of the storm was this unidentified sloop,

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Wooley Bully,

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Hindu, 

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and Joan Turecamo with Nomadic Hjellestad.

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And look at that rain.

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All fotos this morning by Will Van Dorp.

At 0630 today . . .  this vessel was still in Gravesend Bay, flanked by two tugboats.  I recalled it’d been there for about two days.

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As the tide turned, one assist tug switched out and others added.

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Three hours later . . . it was Margaret Moran, Joan Turecamo, and Marion Moran . . . and

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then Gramma Lee T Moran hooked into the bow, totaling over 16,000 hp if needed.  Pretty World looked like a dead ship.

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Towing stern first,

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Gramma Lee T brought her into Upper Bay by noon and then on to GMD Bayonne.  It looks like time to pop the hood on Pretty World.

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All fotos by Will Van Dorp.

 


“Excessive wind”  . . . i.e., a constant 20+ mph describes Wednesday’s weather quite well.  The following fotos all come thanks to Capt. Fred Kosnac, who was on one tug of three accompanying the Weeks crane barge to the right.   Farther up the dock, notice the blue/green hull of a container ship, MOL Destiny.

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Two hours later, notice our perspective relative to MOL Destiny.  The tugs with the crane barge were asked to move to make room for passing traffic . . .  the black hulled container ship.  The next fotos all transpire in a three-minute period as docking tugs struggle to safely get MSC Nerissa to the dock on the opposite side of the channel.

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Count the tugs wrestling the MSC vessel over.  There’s Joan Turecamo, Gramma Lee T Moran, and

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Resolute.    The other two container vessels are Zim Luanda and Ever Respect.  And the Weeks 533, see her here lifting locomotives a few years back and an Airbus 320 –now in a Charlotte museum–before that.

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These are the hidden dramas that routinely happen in the context of moving our goods into and out of the port.

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By now . . . a mere 48 hours later, these behemoths are hundreds of miles from here and from each other, the docking tugs have finished at least a half dozen other docking assists, and the Weeks barge and tugs  . . . at work on other projects.    Again, thanks for these to Capt. Fred Kosnac.

Unrelated:  Does anyone know whether whether any wooden 64′ USCG tugs still exist?

Also unrelated:  I found the incident I recalled reading that involved M/V Cosette, mentioned a few days ago.  Here’s the article.   I still don’t know if she’s scrapped or sunk or still sailing.

Totally related foto from summer 2009, the orange Fred K II.

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