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On a windy day recently in the Beerkanaal section greater Rotterdam harbor, Jan Oosterboer took these photos, passed along by Jan van der Doe.

The small boats here are operated by the KRVE, self-translated as “rowers” but more likely we’d call them linesmen.  The more distant KRVE boat is alongside Smit Cheetah.  The link that follow are mostly for previous instances these boats have appeared on this blog.

Here’s their own site in English.

Fairplay 27

SD Rebel

Multratug 31

In the distance newly-launched LNG carrier Vladimir Rusanov, shuttling between Rotterdam and Russian Kara Sea port of Sabetta.   I had to look up Sabetta, since I’d not heard of it:  average annual temperature is 14 degrees F, -10 C

Above and below, that’s Smit Hudson.

Iskes tug Venus is about three years old. 

 

Above and below FairPlay X,

which has not been on this blog before.  Multratug 5 shows her Japanese origins, 

here with Beagle, new this spring.

Many thanks to Jan and Jan for these photos.  Any errors in text are mine.

 

These photos come via Jan van der Doe and were taken by Jan Oosterboer in the Lekhaven area of Rotterdam.

Lingestroom, a Damen Shoalbuster 3512 design and launched in 2017, measures 114′ x 39′ and is powered by triple screw driven by three Caterpillar C32-TTA SCAC.

Unrelated, notice the stack for the Atlanship SA orange juice tanker on the far side of the building?  I’m not sure which tanker that is.

MTS Indus is 82′ x 24.’    More info here.  Just beyond Indus and against the dock is MTS Vanquish, a 2909 Stantug design from Damen.

Sea Bronco is a SeaContractor tug with two Caterpillar 3508B engines.

En Avant 20 is a twin Schottel 5000 hp tug built in 2006.  I like the slogan on the building on the right side of the photo.

 

Union Princess is queen of the dock here:  221′ loa x 51′ and powered by two Wärtsilä 16v32 LND engines for a total of just over 16,000 hp.

Dian Kingdom measures 107′ x 36.’

 

I hope you enjoyed this look around the dock in Lekhaven, thanks to Jan and Jan.  For the first seven in the series, click here.

 

Again, these photos come via Jan van der Doe from Vianen at the Merwedekanaal, and taken by  Huug Pieterse from Arkel and Leo Schuitemaker from Klundert.  By the way, Klundert became a city in 1357!

Noorderlight dates from 1941.  I’m not sure which small tug she’s towing.

Wiepke, 1946.

Zuiderzee, 1930.

Maartje Anna, 1923.

Finally, for now, Noorman, 1939.

Many thanks to Jan.  I’m working on catching up.  All these photos–today’s and yesterday’s–were taken in the second half of May.

 

These photos come via Jan van der Doe from Vianen at the Merwedekanaal, and taken by  Huug Pieterse from Arkel and Leo Schuitemaker from Klundert.  By the way, Klundert became a city in 1357!

I’m making an attempt at matching these up with some basic info.  So Storm dates from 1909 and David from 1947.

Harmonie is 1919,

Jan, 1917; and

Guardian is 1926.

 

Elizabeth . ..  I don’t know.

I have many, many more photos from Jan to catch up on, and will try to do so.  What always amazes me is how many restored tugboats/yachts there are in the Netherlands.

In the photos below you are looking at Time is Money, a famous parlevinker.  A what??!

Well, have a close look and you’ll know . . .

A parlevinker is basically a floating supermarket, or more like a bodega on the water.  In English it’s a bum boat, but when’s the last time you saw a functioning bum boat;  there might still be one in NY harbor here, but it’s been converted into a loft on water.  It wouldn’t work in the sixth boro, IMHO, because we don’t have a critical mass of people working and living on or in close enough proximity to the water.  Click here for more info on Time is Money and its longtime owner Wim van Vooren.    And if you look up-close at the exhibits on the top deck below the flags, they’re some Hertog Jan, sister beverages of Budweiser, siblings of the InBev family.

And while we’re on the unusual, ws, Walter, a frequent commenter here, told me about a lot of lobsters being released into the sixth boro last week:  “Last Friday, a group of local Buddhists released a lot of live lobster into the North River at 100th Street. It’s been done before.  I don’t know the lobster’s chances of survival, but it’s got to be a lot better than their chances of survival if they ended up on someone’s plate.”  Here’s a Huff Post account.

These photos and many more to come were taken last weekend in the Netherlands by Leo Schuitemaker and forwarded by Jan van der Doe.   Many thanks Jan and Leo.

Here’s a seven minute video clip on Time is Money.  It’s in Dutch, but the interesting images start after one minute.  Some translation:  His family started the  business in 1932, when there were about a hundred such boats working the inland waterways in the Netherlands.  He himself started in 1962.  He would serve 10–35 clients a day.  A few of the “shopping in the waterway on the fly” scenes are great. Here’s a 20-minute one.

Here from Lock E-28A, Bob Stopper’s photo of Canal Corp’s efforts to get the Canal open for season 200!

The rest of these photos come from Jan van der Doe, starting with Sandra Mary, 1962,  in McNally colors and built by Russel-Hipwell at Owen Sound in 1962.

W. N. Twolan, also 1962 built, alongside Menier Consol.

At the end and off the stern of W. N. Twolan, it’s the last side-wheeler ferry to operate on the Great Lakes, PS Trillium, launched in 1910.  To see Trillium after a 1975 refit, click here.

In what I first thought was an unusual military dazzle pattern is actually a 1966 Davie Shipbuilding former cargo vessel that’s been reborn as a floating dry dock.  Click here for Menier Consol transporting pulpwood. 

Last but not least, it’s William Rest, 1961.  Toronto Dry Dock is one of so many places I need to visit.

Many thanks to Bob and Jan for these photos.

More old steel today and all from Jan van der Doe.  I posted a stern view of the vessel below a few days ago . . . here’s more of the story, as much as I understand.  Between 1944 and 1990, it had German, Belgian, and Dutch owners, both governmental and private.  Since 1990, it’s been owned by Americans who keep it in Rotterdam.

The rest of these photos Jan took in Hamilton ON, and some of the boats

might be in greater jeopardy.  Florence M, Tony MacKay, and James A. Hannah have all been on this blog before, and with some of the same company.  One of these days, they may no longer be there, and they may no longer BE.

I gather these are Carrol C 1 and Bonnie B. from that same 2015 post.

Molly M I works for Nadro Marine and was built in 1962.

William is the name and Bermingham is the company here, and she’s almost 80 years old.   Unrelated:  What material is stored in the domes?

Many thanks to Jan for his updates from Rotterdam and Hamilton.

 

If you’ve yet to make your first trip to the Netherlands and you’re interested in tugboats, then Maassluis in one of a handful of must-see places.    Jan van der doe went there recently and sent these.  I was there last year and got some of the same photos, just two months later in the season.  As you can see,  the Dutch have wet and misty winters.  This is the “binnenhaven” or “inner harbor.”  For some great 1945 photos of the same place, click here.

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I’m not repeating details on these boats, because most of them I commented on last year.

trip-2017-130

This boat’s name is tribute to the same person for whom our fair river is named, obviously.

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Here we move counterclockwise around the harbor;  that white building with the pointy tower is the National Tugboat Museum.

trip-2017-150

 

trip-2017-147

I’d translate Krimpen as “shrink,” but I don’t know if that’s the sense here.

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Here we’re back to the location of photo #1 but we look to the right, toward the big river, the Nieuwe Waterweg.  “Waterweg” translates as “waterway.”

trip-2017-131

 

 

trip-2017-146

If I walk in this direction a few blocks and follow this boat looking to my left, I’d be headed past Schiedam and the Mammoet Bollard Building and get to waters edge Rotterdam, about which I’ve done lots of posts.

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All photos thanks to Jan van der Doe.

Here’s a short but motley set of photos.  Can you identify the tug below sporting the Canadian flag?  Answer follows.

opp1

Below it’s Barry Silverton, pushing Fight ALS eastbound on the East River.   Big Allis identifies the location, where Don Jon folks/equipment have recently placed the platforms to the lower right side of the photo.

opp2

And finally, from the Port of Toronto, it’s Mr. Kane, who first appeared on this blog here, although it is not identified except in the comments thanks to Isaac Pennock.

toronto-harbourfront-23-sept-2016-m-r-kane1

So the top photo, it’s Cheyenne, quite possibly the last vessel to traverse the Erie Canal this season.  I’m not sure if they have already reached the Hudson River.  She’s flying the Canadian courtesy flag because she had just exited the Welland Canal at Port Weller at that time.  Here’s a photo taken by fire girl two seasons ago, Cheyenne doing the part of the Canal at the east end of Sylvan Beach.

Thanks much to George Haynes, Jonathan Steinman, and Jan van der Doe for these photos.

Happy Thanksgiving to all.  Thanks much for continuing to read tugster.  If there’s interest in the proposal below, I’ll try to fashion a post from your contributions soon if not tomorrow.

Proposal:  If you are working [today] Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in any other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.

So the difference that makes the “really” is that several folks have contributed these photos.

Starting in Toronto with Jan van der Doe, here’s M. R. Kane, which has appeared here and here previously on this blog.  In the first link, you’ll see Kane towing the hull that would become tall ship Oliver Hazard Perry.

rrt1

Next three photos came from Allan Seymour, who took them as he traversed the Cape Cod Canal recently.  This Independence is rated at 5400 hp.

rrt2

Bohemia and barge wait to pass.

rrt4

And Buckley McAllister shares escort work on the Canal with Independence.

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The rest of these photos I’ve caught recently, all of tugs I’d not previously seen.  Miss Ila came through the sixth boro Saturday,

rrt5

Miss Lizzy I saw Friday, and

rrt6

 

Performance I saw in Massena earlier this month, and

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Robinson Bay.  These last two are operated by DOT’s Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (SLSDC), which is looking to replace these aging tugs.  Robinson Bay (103′ loa and built in Wisconsin in 1957) and Performance (50′ and Indiana, 1997) do maintenance work on the US portions of the Saint Lawrence Seaway.

rrt9

 

Thanks to Jan and Allan for the first photos here.  All the others are by Will Van Dorp.

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