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More old steel today and all from Jan van der Doe.  I posted a stern view of the vessel below a few days ago . . . here’s more of the story, as much as I understand.  Between 1944 and 1990, it had German, Belgian, and Dutch owners, both governmental and private.  Since 1990, it’s been owned by Americans who keep it in Rotterdam.

The rest of these photos Jan took in Hamilton ON, and some of the boats

might be in greater jeopardy.  Florence M, Tony MacKay, and James A. Hannah have all been on this blog before, and with some of the same company.  One of these days, they may no longer be there, and they may no longer BE.

I gather these are Carrol C 1 and Bonnie B. from that same 2015 post.

Molly M I works for Nadro Marine and was built in 1962.

William is the name and Bermingham is the company here, and she’s almost 80 years old.   Unrelated:  What material is stored in the domes?

Many thanks to Jan for his updates from Rotterdam and Hamilton.

 

If you’ve yet to make your first trip to the Netherlands and you’re interested in tugboats, then Maassluis in one of a handful of must-see places.    Jan van der doe went there recently and sent these.  I was there last year and got some of the same photos, just two months later in the season.  As you can see,  the Dutch have wet and misty winters.  This is the “binnenhaven” or “inner harbor.”  For some great 1945 photos of the same place, click here.

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I’m not repeating details on these boats, because most of them I commented on last year.

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This boat’s name is tribute to the same person for whom our fair river is named, obviously.

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Here we move counterclockwise around the harbor;  that white building with the pointy tower is the National Tugboat Museum.

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I’d translate Krimpen as “shrink,” but I don’t know if that’s the sense here.

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Here we’re back to the location of photo #1 but we look to the right, toward the big river, the Nieuwe Waterweg.  “Waterweg” translates as “waterway.”

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If I walk in this direction a few blocks and follow this boat looking to my left, I’d be headed past Schiedam and the Mammoet Bollard Building and get to waters edge Rotterdam, about which I’ve done lots of posts.

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All photos thanks to Jan van der Doe.

Here’s a short but motley set of photos.  Can you identify the tug below sporting the Canadian flag?  Answer follows.

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Below it’s Barry Silverton, pushing Fight ALS eastbound on the East River.   Big Allis identifies the location, where Don Jon folks/equipment have recently placed the platforms to the lower right side of the photo.

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And finally, from the Port of Toronto, it’s Mr. Kane, who first appeared on this blog here, although it is not identified except in the comments thanks to Isaac Pennock.

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So the top photo, it’s Cheyenne, quite possibly the last vessel to traverse the Erie Canal this season.  I’m not sure if they have already reached the Hudson River.  She’s flying the Canadian courtesy flag because she had just exited the Welland Canal at Port Weller at that time.  Here’s a photo taken by fire girl two seasons ago, Cheyenne doing the part of the Canal at the east end of Sylvan Beach.

Thanks much to George Haynes, Jonathan Steinman, and Jan van der Doe for these photos.

Happy Thanksgiving to all.  Thanks much for continuing to read tugster.  If there’s interest in the proposal below, I’ll try to fashion a post from your contributions soon if not tomorrow.

Proposal:  If you are working [today] Thursday and therefore having lunch and/or dinner at work–whether on a vessel or in any other work setting–and you choose to take a photo of the dinner–any aspect of the meal–and send it to me, please do and I’ll try to devise a post with it on Friday this week.  Thanks for the consideration.

So the difference that makes the “really” is that several folks have contributed these photos.

Starting in Toronto with Jan van der Doe, here’s M. R. Kane, which has appeared here and here previously on this blog.  In the first link, you’ll see Kane towing the hull that would become tall ship Oliver Hazard Perry.

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Next three photos came from Allan Seymour, who took them as he traversed the Cape Cod Canal recently.  This Independence is rated at 5400 hp.

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Bohemia and barge wait to pass.

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And Buckley McAllister shares escort work on the Canal with Independence.

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The rest of these photos I’ve caught recently, all of tugs I’d not previously seen.  Miss Ila came through the sixth bork Saturday,

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Miss Lizzy I saw Friday, and

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Performance I saw in Massena earlier this month, and

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Robinson Bay.  These last two are operated by DOT’s Saint Lawrence Seaway Development Corporation (SLSDC), which is looking to replace these aging tugs.  Robinson Bay (103′ loa and built in Wisconsin in 1957) and Performance (50′ and Indiana, 1997) do maintenance work on the US portions of the Saint Lawrence Seaway.

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Thanks to Jan and Allan for the first photos here.  All the others are by Will Van Dorp.

“I have worked on two salvage tugs,” writes Jan.  “The first one, Hercules in 1957-1958, was a seagoing salvage-tug/icebreaker built in 1943 for the German Air Force/Navy to salvage plane wrecks in the Baltic Sea.  After the war the tug sailed for Bugsier and came under the Dutch flag in 1950.  In 1984 [ as Temi IV] it capsized and sank. Salvaged and scrapped.”
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“The second one was Zeepaard [ trans. Seahorse] in 1960-1961.   Zeepaard was built in 1947 and used as tug/salvage tug by Tak’s Berging (W.A van den Tak Bergings Bedrijf N.V.),  a sister company of L. Smit & Co. Internationale Sleepdienst Mij. N.V.  Still in service.  Now as a pusher-tug with the name Liberty.”
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Thanks, Jan.

Let’s start at the sixth boro’s own Kearny Point.  Federal Ship Building & Dry Dock used to be there.  On December 1, 1943, a time when that place was turning out a vessel a week or so, hull #303 was delivered as USS Stern, DE-187.     After eight years as a USN vessel, she was transferred to the Netherlands as F-811, HNLMS Van Zijll, her identity until 1967 when she was returned to the US and scrapped.

John van der Doe, frequent contributor on this blog, sailed on F-811 around the world in 1954–55, as he says “employed with the US Naval Task-force Pacific fleet 4 or 6 (forgot the number) during the Korean war.”

Port Said, 1954, north entrance to the Suez Canal.  The large statue shows Ferdinand de Lesseps.  A few years later, the statue was dynamited as celebration of the nationalization of the Canal.

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Aden, stop for bunkers.

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Hong Kong, awaiting orders.

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Yokosuka, Japan, here and

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here.   That background landscape is still recognizable today.

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Papeete.

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Click here for some more of that era.

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Pacific side of the Panama Canal, now 1955.

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Original “mule” style.  Click here (and scroll) for photos of the mules from 2012.  I wonder what the next generation will be.

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And here’s a photo of the Kearny-built vessel taking on stores in Ponta Delgada, Azores.

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Later, Jan took this photo in then-Leningrad.  I believe that’s St. Isaac’s Cathedral.

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Many thanks to Jan for these photos from long ago and faraway.

The 94′ Red Star tug Ocean Queen, Bushey-built in 1941, towing the barge Bouchard No. 110 with 20,000 barrels of petroleum, was going up the East River on 12 March. The 572′  tanker Four Lakes, (likely not the ESSO tanker shown here) was going south when she rammed the Ocean Queen just below Hell Gate. The captain of Ocean Queen was lost; four other crew were rescued, and the barge did not sink.  Click here to find the “findings of fact and conclusions of law” by Judge Motley, September 1974.  Unrelated, Four Lakes was lost in February 1972 when it exploded during tank cleaning 60 miles off Galveston.

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Click here (and scroll) for a photo of this tug–Lac Manitoba–taken in May go this year.  In June, Lac Manitoba was one of two tugs that capsized in Cornwall, ON, sucked under while working upstream of a spudded barge.

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I also took a photo of Lac Manitoba here seven years ago in Ogdensburg, NY.

Many thanks to Harry Thompson for the top photo and to Jan van der Doe for the bottom one.

Here’s an index for the previous in the series.

I got this photo in July 2003 in Oswego, the 1943 Bushey tug  WYTM-71 Apalachee.  I haven’t seen it since, although it was at one time in Cleveland.  Anyone know if it’s still there?

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Here’s another Great Lakes tug, for now.  This photo of James A. Hannah was taken by Jan van der Doe in Hamilton harbor in late May 2015.  I posted it here then in this larger context.  And here in February 2012, thanks to Isaac Pennock.  Now I knew that James (LT-820, launched July 1945) was a sister to Bloxom (LT-653) and that the Hannah fleet had been sold off in 2009 in a US Marshal’s sale, but I hadn’t known until yesterday that the CEO of the Hannah fleet–Donald C. Hannah–was Daryl C. Hannah’s father!!  That Daryl Hannah!  But it gets even better, there once was a towboat named Daryl C. Hannah!  Anyone know what became of it?  Last I could find, it was on the bank of the Calumet River used as an office.  Updates?

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As you can tell, this photo was taken in the East River.  It was July 2009 that Marjorie B. McAllister escorts Atlantic Superior as it heads for sea.  Any ideas where Atlantic Superior is today?   Actually, I know this one . . . after a long and eventful life, she powered herself over to China this year to be scrapped.

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I haven’t seen Bismarck Sea here in quite a while, but last I knew, she was operating in the Pacific Northwest.

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King Philip . . . went to Ecuador around 2012; Patriot Service is still working in the Gulf of Mexico, I believe.

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And to round out this glance back, here’s a list of WW2 vessels still operating at the time of its compilation.  Many thanks to aka Fairlane for putting it together.

Thanks to Jan van der Doe for the Hannah photo;  all others by Will Van Dorp.

By the way, it was rewatching The Pope of Greenwich Village that got me to wonder about Daryl Hannah.

. . . the Detroit River, an international race.  See my post here from four years ago for this quite eclectic set of boats.

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Sheila Kaye and Josephine,

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J. M. Westcott II,

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R & R,

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Jessie T,

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and more.

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I wonder if there’s ever a chance of getting a higher horsepower class to arrive some year as well . ..  like Ken Boothe Sr., Everlast, GL Ostrander, Samuel de Champlain, Jane Ann IV . . . and their size.

 

All photos by Jan van der Doe, taken the same day as the Mermaid Parade and the last run of Pegasus.

All these photos come compliments of frequent commenter Jan van der Doe.  And all were taken in Hamilton Harbour, the southwest corner of the lake where I learned to swim.

Hamilton is headquarters for McKeil Marine, whose vessels have been posted on this blog herehere and here.

Click here for the specs on Leonard M.

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Click here for info on Tony MacKay.

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Florence M needs TLC and paint.

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Here’s another shot of Tony and Florence.

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From left here, more McKeil Marine vessels:  Carrol C 1, Bonnie B, and James A. Hannah.  This latter (rightmost) tugboat has appeared on tugster before, and in fact is a sibling of Captain Bob (in the Columbia) and Bloxom, the faded red tugboat on the cover of our 30-minute documentary film Graves of Arthur Kill.  If you want to read about the dispersion of the entire Hannah fleet by the U. S. Marshal’s auction, click here.

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Here’s a side view of the same three boats.

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Click here for the specs on Kingfish 1.  

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Believe it or not, this blue-hulled vessel below dates from 1959 and used to be known as Helen M. McAllister.   Here’s her story as told from a different perspective.

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Jerry G. is one year younger.  Click here for more info.

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This looks like two old but active boats,  Lac Manitoba and Vigilant I, both of Nadro Marine.

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And finally, Jan didn’t pass along info on the black hulled vessel to the left. Pacific Standard . . . ex-Irishman (?) is my guess.

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I visited Hamilton twice 50 or more years ago to visit a relative there.  I recall not liking the city.  But what does a kid know?  Jan’s photos in this post and tugboathunter’s here inspire me to consider a return there.

Jan . . . many thanks.

Somewhat related, for a great database of Owen Sound-built boats, click here.

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Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Tale of Two Marlins

Blue Marlin spent 600+ hours loading tugs and barges in NYC Sixth Boro. Click on image for presentation made to NY Ship Lore and Model Club, July 25, 2011.

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