You are currently browsing the tag archive for the ‘James E. Brown’ tag.

Frances heads out to earn some money on a rainy yesterday morning.  I’ve no idea what that red glow behind the Statue is.

Lincoln Sea has worked on both coasts since I’ve been doing this blog, and like Frances, has kept the same name.  Click here to see her in my second ever blog post . . . 2006.

Michael Miller here moves equipment to and from islands in the boro’s archipelago.  I first saw this vessel as Stapleton Service.

Annie G II goes way back on this blog too.  Recently she’s been doing a job over west of the Staten Island Ferry racks, a job she was the perfect size for.   She’s a WGI tug.

Jane A. Bouchard was out along the east side of Staten Island, passing the old US Marine Hospital.  See it here if you scroll way through.

Ellen McAllister was heading out for a call.  I likely first posted a photo of her here.

In that photo earlier, Jane was headed to meet up with Evening Star and her barge.

James E. Brown and Thomas J. Brown tag teamed car float NYNJR 200, the newest and largest car float in the sixth boro.

Ditto, CMT Pike and Helen Laraway meet up on a set of scows.

And to close this out, it’s Austin Reinauer, Boston-bound in the rain.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

All photos in this post come from Paul Strubeck, who has started a blog here called vintagedieseldesign.

Mary H is the right size to serve the fuel storage in Newtown Creek, a renowned location in the sixth boro. Here are previous posts I’ve done there.

The first oil refinery in the US was sited here, and that industry fouled it, given attitudes at that time toward the environment and disposal of chemical waste.

Today a lot of commerce happens there from oil storage to scrap metal processing.

 

 

 

 

The creek has its advocates, these folks and others. At its headwaters lies Bushwick, not for everyone but vibrant in its own way.  Here’s a post I did last fall after a tour on land and on the water of Bushwick.

Again, thanks to Paul for these photos.

 

The Browns tugs do a lot of different jobs, and who knows where James E. was headed this morning a few days ago, but

one of their regular runs is with the car float moving rail cars for the operation now down as the NYNJRR, the last application of what used to be very common across the sixth boro. 

There are no bridge rail crossings of the Hudson south of the Selkirk hurdle, about 140 miles north of Manhattan. So this is how it happens, and I know lots of you reading this know much more about this operation than I do.  For a photo of a train crossing that bridge known as the Alfred H. Smith Memorial Bridge, see the end of this post.

One or several crossings are done this way daily between Greenville NJ  and Brooklyn NY.

 

All photos by Will Van Dorp, who got the photo below of a train headed east across the Alfred H. Smith Bridge a rainy day in October 2016.

 

Thomas J. Brown and Sons Inc. has been a marine towing enterprise in the sixth boro since 1927.  Their boats are busy and always very attractive. More than a decade ago I first used this title.

Thomas J. Brown, the oldest current boat, is a classic.

Joyce D. Brown, the most powerful current boat, is headed past Shooters Island here.  That color . . .  I just love it, especially in winter like this.

The newest boat–James E–arrived from the shipyard just a few years ago and regularly moves the rail cars across the boro.   I wonder if this cross-harbor rail tunnel will ever happen.

A few weeks ago James E. was moving this jackup platform.

Paul Strubeck caught the same job here.

As he did catching Thomas assisting James moving rail cars.

And finally, a real treat from Paul, a photo of Cecilia J. Brown, ex- DPC 42, Skipper (1948), Viatic (1952/54), Dalzellance (1957), Cecilia J. Brown, reefed some years ago, although I know not where.

Thanks to Paul for his photos;  all others by will Van Dorp.

 

I love the morning, and I’ve never gotten a better photo of Tasman Sea.  She’s a product of Main Iron Works, class of 1976.

Kirby Moran heads out on a job.   There’s no angle from which these Washburn & Doughty 6000s look anything but stunning.

Ernest Campbell, from Southern Shipbuilding’s class of 1969, comes by to pick up a barge.

James E. Brown, a recent product of Rodriguez Shipbuilding, leaves the dock and heads to the railroad, rail float that is. Daisy Mae came out of the same yard two years later.

As Robert Burton makes her run with a less than loaded barge, I hope commuters appreciate that this stuff is not traveling by road.

Lucy Reinauer is a powerful local 1973 product;  she came out of Jakobson Shipyard in Oyster Bay.

I’m planning a post on nothing but Brown boats, but I put Thomas J. in here because she’s bathed in that same rich morning light.   She’s a 1962 product of Gladding Hearn and is rated at 1000 hp, same as James E.

Elizabeth McAllister has a dramatic and rich history, which you can read here.  To summarize, in May 1988 as Elizabeth Moran, she was t-boned in the fog in Lower New York Bay.

And finally, two of Brewster Marine‘s workhorses . . .  Helen Parker (2005) and Ava Jude (2013).  In the distance is Neptune, built 1992 and sailing for Dann Ocean since 1996.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

Seeing a tugboat on a mooring in the sixth boro is unusual, in my experience, and I took many shots.  This is my favorite.

Neptune the other morning headed for sea along the sylvan banks of Staten Island.

James E. Brown moves a scow, likely to be filled with scrap metals.

Brian Nicholas travels to a job  . . . that’s New Jersey off her starboard.

JRT Moran crosses the Upper Bay enroute to an assist.

Genesis Eagle travels along Brooklyn’s Owl’s Head.

One almost has the illusion here that Emily Ann is on assist with that tanker.  Almost.

Mister Jim lighters salt

from SBI Phoebe.

Sea Lion heads out of her base to grab  . . . a recycling barge perhaps.

And Atlantic Salvor continues shuttling dredge spoils from somewhere off the bottom of the North River.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

 

By the numbers today, Daisy Mae,  launched in late 2017 and generating 3200 hp.

Joyce D. Brown, built 2002 and 2600 hp.

Matthew Tibbetts, 1969 and 2000.

James E. Brown, 2015 and 1000.

Dean Reinauer, 2013 and 4260.

Andrea, 1999 and 3000.

Elizabeth McAllister, 1967 and 4000.

Ellen McAllister, also 1967 and 4000.

Kimberley Turecamo, 1980 and 3000.

Joan Turecamo, 1980 and 4300.

Joan Moran, 1975 and 4300.

Miss Ila, 1962 and 2400.

All photos by Will Van Dorp; all numbers from tugboat information.

 

Here’s a good view of the props on a z-drive boat.  The 8.5′ props are part of the Schottel SRP 1515 FP drive system.  Note the port-a-potty between the stacks, a dry-dock worker convenience?

The scale of the cranes at Howland Hook belies the fact that Jay Michael and Bosco, passing Shooters Island, are still at least a mile closer to the lens than HH port.

In different light, here’s a Bosco closeup.

James E. Brown before dawn;  the structure like a lighthouse beyond JEB‘s stern is the control tower at Newark Airport, which celebrates its 90th anniversary this coming October.

The Statue salutes Little C.  I’ve often tried for a photo that suggests the Statue’s eyes are fixed on something in the foreground, and I’d say here Little C has helped me make that happen.

Barge John Blanche is returned homeward through Hell Gate by Diane B.

OK . . .  Is it Joan or Doris?

I’ll stop here.  All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Here was a related post, Yano, watched by John Watson and me simultaeously and from different vantage points, each of us unbeknownst to the other.

Before the snow and cold hit this past week, actually Wednesday Jan 4, I was tipped off about an impending BDD dry dock exit in Bayonne.  And when James E. Brown grasps the door–think of it as a plug–that confirms something will be floating out.

To the extreme left,  see the plug, and Capt. Brian A. McAllister positions itself on the stern of USNS Soderman.

Ellen has the starboard stern quarter, and

Eric has a line on the bow.  For a point-by-point comparison of Eric and the Moran 6000s, click here.

 

Note how the ship dwarfs the lighthouse, and

the harbor dwarfs the ship,

almost entirely obscuring Alex standing by.

All photos by Will Van Dorp, whom wonders if anyone’s going to get photos of Millville and 1964 in the anchorage today.  I’m tied up.

. . . a sixth boro set on a day that was predicted to bring rain.  When I first saw the photo below, I thought the McAllister tug was assisting a DonJon unit?

A few seconds later it was clear that Alex was overtaking the slower Paul Andrew.

 

Dr. Milton Waner–named for a plastic surgeon!!— here travels light.  Harley does have this focus on medicine in their recent namings, like Fight ALS and One Cure.  That’s Durham in the distance with the spud barge.

 

Around the same time, Eric McAllister, Thomas D. Witte, and James E. Brown appear, headed for the Kills.

 

Mr Russell comes out of the Kills.  And can you name the Vane tug in the distance?

Philadelphia!

It must be the newest Vane tug in the sixth boro, and I don’t know if she’s even more recent than Capt. Brian A. McAllister. For all I know, this could be her first week in town….  And from a full decade ago, here’s the previous Philadelphia in town, the ITB Philly.

All photos by Will Van Dorp.

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 1,466 other followers

If looking for specific "word" in archives, search here.
Questions, comments, photos? Email Tugster

Graves of Arthur Kill

Click on image below to order your copy of Graves of Arthur Kill, by Gary Kane and Will Van Dorp. 3Fish Productions.

Seth Tane American Painting

Read my Iraq Hostage memoir online.

My Babylonian Captivity

Reflections of an American hostage in Iraq, 20 years later.

Archives

May 2021
M T W T F S S
 12
3456789
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31