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Almost exactly a decade ago I did this post.  Today I decided to add to it and broaden the geographic scope.  Stick with me to see how broadened this gets.

From the Delaware Memorial Bridge to the entrance of Delaware Bay is about 100 miles.  Near the entrance you see big water and big traffic, like a light Ivory Coast above and a working OSG Vision below.  OSG Vision is mated to OSG 350, a huge barge used to lighter crude oil tankers 342,000 barrels at a time.

Forty miles upstream from the Delaware Memorial, there’s the Ben Franklin Bridge, here with Pilot towing La Princesa and assisted by Grace and Valentine Moran.

Some Delaware River boats are rarely seen in the sixth boro like Jack Holland.

Almost 150  miles upstream from the Philly-Camden area is  Hawk’s Nest Highway, the part of the river once paralleled on the nearer side by the D&H Canal.

Of course I paddled the whole way up there. In fact, this stretch of the Delaware has enough current that a 21st century paddler would not choose to go upstream very far, and a 19th century boat-mule canaler would want to keep navigation separate from the river.

Early summer had its share of young  birds,

deer, and trout visible under the canoe.

Some mysterious paddlers shared the waters.

That New York side of the river . . .

if you look close, you can see in places that these are not natural rock formations. Rather, they support the towpath side of the D & H Canal, way up above the river.

Part of Route 97 is also known as Hawk’s Nest Highway.

To digress, the eastern end of the Canal–about a hundred miles to the NE–is in Kingston NY, and a transshipping point was Island Dock, which

has now overgrown.  I wonder if there’s ever been a project to clear the trees and undergrowth and contemplate a recreation of this important site.  Oil is today’s fuel;  coal was definitely king in this other age.

But let’s back to the Delaware.  North of Barryville, there’s this bridge. At least, it’s now a bridge, but when

John Roebling built it, it was an aqueduct for D & H coal boats bringing anthracite out of the Coal Region to the sixth boro.

 

Here’s a preserved portion of the Canal between Hawley and Honesdale PA, just upstream (water has long long) from Lock 31.   Honesdale was once the transhipping point between railroad cars and canal boats and deserves another visit and maybe a whole post, which maybe I’ll getto when the museum there opens again.

Pennsylvania has place names like Oil City, Cokeburg, and Coal Port.  The coal transported on the D & H came from aptly-named Carbondale, another place that deserves more time.  The commodity legacy is seen in these two businesses

and maybe others.

All photos, WVD, at different points over the past 10 years.  If anyone has ideas about high points along the river you’d suggest I visit, please let me know.  Since my jobs for this summer have fallen through, this might be the year to canoe and hike.

Unrelated, if you haven’t yet read this story about an Argentine in Portugal unable to get home because of cancelled flights and choosing to sail across the Atlantic in a 29′ boat to see his father turn 90, here‘s the link.

 

 

 

On this glum April 1 and  the 25th month in a row, the blog looks back 10 years on day 1 of a new month . . .  and sometimes day 2 as well, with a selection of photos from exactly a decade back, 120 months ago.  What’s particularly interesting for me about this look back is the degree of change in the boro, replacement and realignment otherwise going almost unnoted, like movement only visible in slow motion.

Allied Transportation and their tug Socrates were still around; the company got absorbed into Kirby, and the tug was sold and transported to Nigeria almost eight years ago already.  Here she passed the statue on her way to Florida with the barge Sugar Express.

On this Easter morning, Patapsco hurried eastbound in the KVK.  Patapsco has been sold out of Vane and now carries Steven Wayne nameboards.

I recall that same Easter morning;  Ivory Coast appeared to float in the air as she headed into the Kills. She still carries the same name and livery.

A bit later that morning, the 3800-teu Al-Mutanabbi, launched 1998, headed out with her containers;  since then, the ship has been broken up on the south bank of the Yangtze in Jiangyin, upstream from Shanghai. Since then, UASC has merged with Hapag-Lloyd.  And Al-Mutannabi, he was a poet who lived well but died young because of the power of his poetry.

Al-Sabahia was the same class/size container ship;  she too has been broken up in Jiangyin, just two years ago.  Count the number of containers across to understand the dramatic difference in size of some container ships;  also, note the top of the wheelhouse is nearly at the deck level of the ship, compared with here or here. If you count carefully, that’s 20 across, rather than 13.  Laura K Moran, escorting her in, has been reassigned to another port.

A unique flat-fronted tug,  locally-built tug called Houma, 1970, was still around. She’s been scrapped.  Beyond her is an interesting and eclectic cluster of lower Manhattan architecture, with one of my favorites, the former Standard Oil Building, just to the right of the black pyramid.

We’ll pick up on more April 2010 photos tomorrow.  With increasing restrictions on movement around the boro, I might be digging into my archives a lot for a while.  If you want to help by dipping into your own archives for photos and stories, I would greatly appreciate that.  Maybe it’s time for new permutations of truckster, teamster, bikester, autoster, planester, hutster, hikester, storyster,  . . .  let’s help each other out.

All photos taken by and stories researched by . .  . WVD, who wishes you all health.  Hat tip to you performing essential services out there.

 

 

It’s Cornell, westbound under the Bayonne Bridge.  Now that’s a sight not often seen.  Cornell (1949) occupies a niche likely quite unexpected, as documented here.  In this post (scroll), you see Cornell in 1978!  Hear her inimitable whistles (wait for it) here.

Ivory Coast has truly an unusual name, but I’d never call her Côte d’Ivoire.  That’s been her name now for 20 years;  previously she was Crusader for over 30 years.

Nicole Leigh Reinauer is the first (of three? ) Atlantic II class tug.

Her dimensions and design are similar if not identical to Lincoln Sea, but Nicole has CAT engines instead of EMDs.   This class of ATB is the product of Bob Hill, whose boyhood home in Troy NY  gave him a front row seat to an earlier generation of tugs and barges.

Looking very similar to Nicole Leigh Reinauer, it’s the newest ATB in the boro . . .  Bert Reinauer, photo thanks to Lisa Kolibabek.  Bert,  almost two decades newer, has the same dimensions as Nicole Leigh, but with GEs generating 8400 hp, versus CATs at 7200.

Viking has operated out of the sixth boro since 1992.  Before that, she spent 20 years in the fleet of Nolty J. Theriot, whose rise and fall is documented in Woody Falgoux’s excellent book, Rise of the Cajun Mariners.

For various Viking appearances on tugster over the years, click here.  Note her distinctive Bludworth bow.

Discovery Coast spent a lot of time in the sixth boro a few years ago, but these days she’s rarely here.  Here’s her first appearance in this blog, in 2012.

And the newest ship assist tug in the boro is Capt. Brian A. McAllister.  Here’s a Professional Mariner story about the tug.

The photo of Bert Reinauer thanks to Lisa Kolibabek.  All other photos here in the past week by Will Van Dorp.

 

Ivory Coast

Christian Reinauer

Ross Sea

C. Angelo

Scott Turecamo, New Hampshire, and Brendan Turecamo

Curtis and RTC 82

Mary Alice and Nan Lin Wan

Pearl Coast and Cement Transporter 1801

MSC Maureen, Jonathan C. Moran, and Kirby Moran

All photos taken in April 2018 by Will Van Dorp.

 

Enjoy this sampling of boats and the dates associated with their launch starting from Arabian Sea (2007) on Dry Dock No. 7,

Stephen Reinauer (1970) nearby on 4,

Miss Circle Line . . . (1954 as ST 2124 and later Betsy) ,

Alex McAllister (1985),

Joyce D. Brown (2002) headed home after completing the daily chores,

Crystal Coast (1983) and Justin (1981) heading south into the Chesapeake,

JRT Moran (2016) holding onto an argosy,

Ivory Coast (1967) waiting on the next job,

All photos by Will Van Dorp (1952).

Unrelated, for a long interpretation of Moby Dick (1851) and connections between “grammar school literature” like the Odyssea (est. 1000 BCE) and All Quiet on the Western Front (1929) and connections with folk songs, listen to Bob Dylan (1941) making his Nobel Prize acceptance speech (2017)  here . . .  It’s the best 27 minutes of listening you’ll do today, I believe.

 

What’s prompted the reappearance of the past here is that I’ve been sorting my archives.

So let’s start in April 2008, and this vessel will reappear tomorrow.   I miss that orange in the harbor.

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This is November 2009.  Where is McAllister Brothers (built as Dalzelleagle) these days?

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This is what Eagle Service (now Genesis Eagle) looked like in March 2010.

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Here’s a closer up of the vintage Horizon ship.  Is she still in lay up?

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Ivory Coast, headed into the KVK here on a foggy morning, appeared almost to be floating on air above the water’s surface.

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And here, a mysterious swimmer, Edith Thornton (now in Trinidad as Chassidy?), and a Hanjin ship.

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All photos by Will Van Dorp, who wonders who says things stay the same.

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